Wexford

Farmer jailed for cruelty

Irish Independent, 8/2/2001

A 72 year old farmer convicted of animal cruelty opted to go to jail rather than pay a ₤5,000 donation to the ISPCA. Farmer Gerard Roche of Johnstown, Co. Wexford had appeared in Court on several occasions on a series of animal cruelty charges between December 1999 and March 2000. Roche had been given a six month suspended sentence by Judge Donnchadh O Buachall on condition that he paid the money. The judge told Roche that as he refused to pay the money he would make an order that he spend six months in jail.


Two brothers charged with animal cruelty

Irish Time, 25/9/2003

Mervyn Walsh, Ballyvadden, Gorey, Co Wexford appeared at Enniscorthy District Court yesterday having failed to appear on six previous occasions in relation to animal cruelty charges after returning from Kenya following the foot and mouth outbreak. Judge Donnchadh Obuachalla handed down the three month suspended prison sentence and ordered that the defendant is not a fit person to be in control of livestock including sheep. His brother William Walsh of the same address who was present in court having also returned from Kenya was fined €1,000 in relation to an animal cruelty charge. Supt Pat Delaney told the court the cruelty offences took place over two years ago after the defendants’ entire herd had been culled by the DOA. The brothers failed to bury a number of cattle carcases that were left lying on the land, he said.



Animal cruelty conviction at Kilcock District Court

Leinster Leader, 12/7/2012

A man who left injured animals in a field in west Kildare has been convicted for animal cruelty at Kilcock District Court.  Gerry Connors (73), Esmonde Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford, was keeping six horses in a rented field at Derryvarogue, Donadea. After Gardai were alerted to the conditions in which the animals were being kept, one of them, a Clydesdale horse, had to be put down after the Kildare Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (KSPCA) was called in.

The offence took place on 24 January 2011 and Judge Desmond Zaidan banned Mr. Connors from keeping horses again.  Garda Sean Tierney said in evidence that he got a call from the KSPCA and met Mary Lawlor and Stewart Keane at the field.  The Grey Abbey veterinary service was also called and one horse, a big white animal, which was in foal at the time, was put down. The other five animals were taken to the pound and were alright.  Garda Tierney said Mr. Connors was unhappy the horse had been put down. It was said to be worth €12,000.  The wound on the injured horse were “foul smelling” and “gangrenous” and there was swelling “the size of a football”.  Garda Tierney said the vet put the horse down on “humane grounds”.

David Powderly, solicitor for Mr. Connors, said his client was in the horse business all his life and felt the animals were being looked after. He paid someone in the area to feed them and they were fed properly.  The Court heard that Mr. Connors had also been in ill health and had eight children.  He had no pension from the State, said Mr. Powderly.

Judge Zaidan questioned this and Mr. Powerly said Mr. Connors operated outside of the system all his life and was involved in scrap buying. The Judge said he should be entitled to his pension. The Court heard that the owner of the field had to pay €200 to get the horse removed and the KSPCA had to pay €200 to the vet.  Judge Zaidan said the horse was in a “despicable” condition. He imposed a €1000 fine with €400 costs.



Farmer convicted of animal cruelty chooses jail instead of fine

Irish Examiner, 08/02/2001

A 72-year-old Wexford farmer, convicted of several serious cases of animal cruelty, opted to go to jail for six months rather than pay a £5,000 donation to the Wexford Branch of the ISPCA.

“You gave me the option of paying or going to jail. I’m going to jail,” defiant farmer Gerard Roche, Johnstown, Duncormack, Co. Wexford, told Judge Donnachadh O Buachalla at Wexford District Court.

The judge told the defendant that he was imposing a six-month suspended sentence on him on condition that he paid the money over and asked him if he needed more time to get the cash together”. The defendant replied to the judge: “I don’t need any more time, I’m quite determined that I’m not paying.”

Roche who represented himself in court was asked by Judge O Buachalla if he needed a solicitor.

“I don’t need one,” replied Roche.

Judge O Buachalla told the defendant that in that event he would make an order that he complete six months imprisonment. Roche was then taken to Wexford Garda Station before being transferred to Mountjoy.

Roche had appeared in court on several occasions in respect of a series of animal cruelty cases which occurred between December, 1999, and March, 2000. In November, the court heard that while Roche had sold his herd for £80,000, much of the money had been spent on paying farm debts.

The remainder of the money was said to be needed to improve Roche’s appalling living conditions. The judge, however, noted that the defendant still had 200 acres of land, a portion of which, he could sell to make the donation.



Two fined for killing badgers

New Ross Standard, 06/12/1990

Two farmers and a publican were charged at a special court in New Ross on Thursday with unlawfully killing a badger and two cubs at Courthoyle on 15th April.

see more


Twisted teens in farm slaughter

Animals burned alive in latest sickening attack on a quiet rural town

Sunday World, 07/04/2002

Callous youths set fire to a barn containing live sheep and lambs in the latest of crimes that has placed a quiet rural town under permanent siege, according to locals.  see more



Man who hung dog is ‘lunatic’

Sunday World, 26/03//2002

A man has appeared before Gorey District Court for hanging his labrador dog.

  James Boland (47) of Ballinatray Lower, Courtown Harbour, also faces public order offences and criminal damage charges arising from incidents last December.  Superintendent Pat Flynn told Judge Donnchadh O’Buachalla that Boland causes no problems when he’s not drinking but is “like lunatic” when he is. The defendant’s solicitor, David Terrant, said he spoke to a vet who said the killing of the dog was not as cruel as it might appear, and that the dog would have died within 30 seconds.

Superintendent Flynn disagreed, stating there were more humane ways of killing the animal. The judge adjourned the case until November 27, saying it was a very serious.



Pheasant shooter handed €130 fine

Bray People, 19/01/2007

A man who shot a pheasant in his front garden, was fined €130 for killing a protected wild bird out of season by Judge Donnchadh O Buachalla at Wexford District Court.

  Colm Davis of Courtclough Upper, Blackwater admitted the offence which happened at his home on May 3 last year.

  A garda witness told the court that the defendant was upstairs at home when he saw a pheasant in his front garden.  He had a firearm and took out the gun and shot the bird.  He was unaware of the fact that it was outside of the shooting season and the pheasant was a protected wild bird.

  The defendant told the court that he apologised sincerely and said he didn’t know he was doing wrong.

The garda told the court that the defendant had two firearms licences and both of them were revoked following the incident.



Unwanted Greyhounds shot for 10 Euro.

Irish Sun, 21/05/2009  

An Irish greyhound executioner called Larry Earle has been exposed in the Irish Sun ... Earle of Camolin, County Wexford admitted killing greyhounds with a captive bolt gun for 10 euros a time. He said ‘a bolt gun that’s it, end of story them they’re sent to the rendering plant. He refused to say how many greyhounds he kills a year.



Young peregrine falcon shot down on one of its first flights

Breaking News.ie, 13/08/2014

A young peregrine falcon has been shot down in Co Wexford.

  The bird - which was on one of its first flights - was shot with a shotgun at Ballynastraw near Enniscorthy. It had to be put down as a result of its injuries.

  An X-ray has confirmed the falcon was shot with shotgun pellets in its wing and leg. An identification ring placed on the bird’s leg in June of this year showed that it was a young bird on one of its first flights.

  The Parks and Wildlife Service is appealing for the public's help as the bird is a protected species, and shooting them is a criminal offence.

  Dominic Berridge from the Service said: "There seems to have been an increase in the deliberate killing of peregrines in recent years with several unexplained nest failures in the south-east. The finding of this bird is not an isolated incident.

  "There have been attempts to poison and shoot birds at a number of nests…If people see anything suspicious like a tethered pigeons or a trap, NPWS staff should be called."

  The Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Heather Humphreys TD, added: "It is intolerable for protected birds of prey to be persecuted, poisoned or shot.

"Not only is this activity illegal and barbaric, it also harms our reputation as a country that values its wildlife. I would urge anyone to report such incidents to the National Parks and Wildlife Service in my Department."



Appeal after peregrine falcon illegally shot in Co WexfordProtected bird of prey had to be euthanised by parks service due to severity of injuries

Irish Times, 13/08/2014

The National Parks and Wildlife Service is has appealed for information after a young peregrine falcon was illegally shot in Co Wexford.

  The native bird of prey had to be euthanised by the parks service after it was found shot at Ballynastraw near Enniscorthy due to the severity of its injuries.

  X-rays showed that the bird was hit with shotgun pellets in its wings and leg, the Department of Arts and Heritage said in a statement. Vets said the injuries were so bad that rehabilitation was unlikely.

  The falcon was young and on one of its first flights, according to an identification ring on its leg.

  The parks service has raised concern about an increase in the deliberate killings of peregrines in recent years. It said there were several unexplained nest failures in the south-east.

  “The finding of this bird is not an isolated incident. There have been attempts to poison and shoot birds at a number of nests and if people see anything suspicious like a tethered pigeons or a trap, NPWS staff should be called,”Dominic Berridge of the Wexford Wildfowl Reserve at the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NWPS) said.

  It was “intolerable” for birds of prey and other wildlife “to be persecuted, poisoned or shot,”Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys said in a statement.

  “Not only is this activity illegal and barbaric, it also harms our reputation as a country that values its wildlife,” she said. She urged the public to report incidents to the NPWS.

  Peregrine falcons are a protected species and receive high legal protection under law . The killing of them is a criminal offence.

Anyone with information which could assist the investigation is asked to contact Mr Berridge at 076-1002660