Tipperary

Man gets jail on angel dust charges.
Irish Times, 22/10/1996.
A Beef farmer with 200 acres in Co. Tipperary has been sentenced to six months imprisonment for possessing angel dust and other illegal hormones on dates between September, 1993, and February, 1995. see more

Two hunters fined £500 each for badger baiting.

Irish Examiner, 25/05/2001.
Two men, found guilty of badger baiting in April, were fined £1,000 in Roscrea District Court yesterday. Donnacha Doyle, 19, of Benamore, Roscrea, and Keith Murray, 21, of Golden Grove, Roscrea, who pleaded not guilty last month to hunting without permission, entering land to hunt, carrying a spade and firearm capable of hunting, hunting a protected animal, a badger, and interfering with a sett – were ordered to pay £500 each to separate animal charities. Two children accompanied the two men on the hunting exposition.


Ordered not to keep animals

Tipperary Star, 27/03/2004

A dog housed in ‘horrific conditions’ was said by Judge O’Neill at Thurles District court to have been ‘literally skin and bone’. The judge made his comment after looking at photographic evidence of the dog found on the premises of Francis Maguire at 43 Butler Avenue, Thurles. Maguire was prosecuted that he did ill-treat the dog and her litter of pups. A witness said the dog was malnourished and thin with her stomach in a sunken state. The judge imposed a fine of €150 and ordered the defendant not have custody of an animal again.



Dog’s leg amputated DIY style – ‘horrific cruelty’
Tipperary Star, 03/05/2007

A springer spaniel dog that was found wandering in a garden in Cashel last weekend with one of its front legs amputated "DIY style" is to be operated on today (Thursday) in an attempt to relieve its suffering.  see more



Worst case of animal cruelty seen in Ireland

Irish Sun, 9/10/2007

(Fergus O' Shea)

A father and son have pleaded guilty to the worst case of animal cruelty ever seen in Ireland. A cop found starving horses with no grass or fodder next to the carcasses of four dead animals at a site rented by Simon O' Dwyer and his son, also called Simon.  Three horses had to be put down while the remaining 25 were taken into care by the Irish Horse Welfare Trust, a judge at Carrick-on-Suir District Court , Co. Tipperary heard.  Just a month later, 51 cattle and one live horse were found in shocking conditions along with the carcasses of four cattle and one horse at the O' Dwyer' Mullinbeg farm.  An investigation by Garda Sgt Stephen O' Sullivan resulted in the seizure of the cattle. Judge Terence Flynn called the animal cruelty the worst he had ever seen in his time working on the bench.  O' Dwyer Snr, 61 and 21-year-old O' Dwyer, Jnr of Knocktoper, Co. Kilkenny were given four-months suspended jail sentences. They were also fined €3,000 each and ordered to pay €38,000 to the Irish Horse Welfare Trust as a contribution to nursing their animals plus €2,000 for carcass disposal and €540 vet fees. 

A Trust spokesman said: "We are looking for kind and experienced homes for the horses."



Poisoners use pigeons as live bait to kill buzzards

Irish Examiner, 27/08/2011

BIRDWATCH Ireland has expressed horror after poisoners used three live pigeons tied to the ground to kill a pair of young buzzards.  see more

Found with dead hare, cages and netting

Tipperary Star (http://www.tipperarystar.ie/news/local/found-with-dead-hare-cages-and-netting-1-2279821), 27/9/2010  

A man who was caught with nets, a dead hare, and other equipment relating to illegal hunting, was fined a total of €600 and ordered to pay €500 in costs by Judge Terence Finn at a sitting of Cashel District Court.  see more


Farmer pays the price - £21,000 fine for using angel dust

Irish Independent, 02/02/1999

A judge warned yesterday of the “most serious nature” of using illegal animal growth promoting substances when he fined a Co Tipperary beef farmer a total of £21,000.  see more



Two hunters fined £500 each for badger baiting

Irish Examiner, 25/05/2001

Two men, found guilty of badger baiting in April, were fined £1,000 in Roscrea District Court yesterday.

  Donnach Doyle, 19, of Benamore, Roscrea, and Keith Murray, 21, of Golden Grove, Roscrea, who pleaded not guilty last month to hunting without permission, entering land to hunt, carrying a spade and firearm capable of hunting, hunting a protected animal, a badger, and interfering with a sett – were ordered to pay £500 each to separate animal charities.

  Keith Murray, an apprentice fitter, was further charged with failing to allow the authorised person to use a shotgun on March 5, 2000, at Kilmartin, Borris-in-Ossory.

  Two children accompanied the two men on the hunting exposition.

  District Judge Mary Martin ordered Mr. Doyle to pay £500 to Badger Watch Ireland and Mr. Murray to pay £500 to the local ISPCA.

  Imposing penalties, Judge Martin adjourned matters in relation to conviction until July 26.

  The case arose following an investigation by conservation ranger James Green. On March 5, 2000, he went to Kilmartin, Borris-in-Ossory, acting on confidential information he received concerning the taking of badgers from the area.

  At about 2.30pm on the day in question, Mr Greene came across a Land Rover, attached to which was a dog box containing two terriers. While he checked the dogs and the tyres on the Land Rover for debris and clay, he heard dogs barking. He moved towards the source of the noise and saw four people walking away from a badger’s sett. One of them was carrying a spade and other was carrying a shotgun.

  Mr Greene said the badger’s sett had been dug up, but stones prevented any entry.

  However, at the sitting of the April court, defence solicitor Paddy Cadell put it to Mr Greene that the Kilmartin area was a very popular area for hunting rabbits.

  Donnacha Doyle told the court they had been out rabbit hunting. Doyle said a dog with them disappeared down a hole and when it did not return after 20 minutes Keith Murray got a stick from the ditch and rooted in the hole.

  A 14-year-old witness who accompanied the defendants told the court, in April, that the group had been hunting rabbits and that they had never been out badger-baiting. The second young witness said they had been hunting rabbits with the men.

  After yesterday’s case, Badger Watch Ireland and the Association of Hunt Saboteurs called on the Government to set up a wildlife crime unit to tackle illegal blood sports. Both groups said the establishment of the unit would represent a major step forward in the fight to end illegal wildlife crime.



110 dogs rescued in farm seizure

The star, 23/01/2004

Gardai and ISPCA inspectors removed 110 Dachshund dogs from a puppy farm yesterday because of poor conditions.

  Twenty-one of the dogs were found in dark and cold conditions in boxes in an old North Tipperary cottage, while 17 puppies were found in cases in an old van.

  Seventy-two other dogs were kept in an open yard in pens.

  The discovery came after the ISPCA received a number of complaints about the North Tipperary puppy farm on their national telephone contact line.


Farm

ISPCA inspectors visited the farm on Wednesday afternoon and discovered that animals there were being kept in inadequate conditions.

  Yesterday, four ISPCA inspectors – accompanied by gardai – visited the farm and discovered the 100 dogs living in cramped conditions without access to fresh bedding, water or food.

  The owner of the farm agreed to let the ISPCA remove the animals from the premises.

  Mr Mark Beazley, the ISPCA inspector leading the investigation, said the dogs were of a pedigree breed.

  The pedigree Dachshunds – more commonly known as sausage dogs – can see for €200 per pup.

  On average the ISPCA raid one to two puppy farms each month throughout the country.

  These farms can house between 10 and 500 animals

  “Puppy farming is not illegal, but certain conditions need to be adhered to.

  “A farm can become illegal if the living conditions are not up to standard,” said Mr Beazley.

  “In a puppy farm we would want well ventilated areas with access for the dogs to heat, shelter, food and bedding.”



Ordered not to keep animals

Tipperary Star, 27/03/2004

A dog housed in what was described as “horrific conditions” was said by Judge O’Neil, in a case at Thurles District Court, to have been “literally skin and bone.”

  Judge O’Neil made his comment after looking at photographic evidence of the condition of the dog found on the property of Francis Maguire, 43 Butler Avenue, Thurles. Maguire was prosecuted that he did cruelly ill-treat the dog and her litter of pups.

  Hannah Fitzgerald, Tipperary Friends of Animals Society, said she went to 44 Butler Avenue having received a report from a concerned member of the public.   She observed the dog run away and her litter of pups were being kept in “bad conditions.” Gardai who accompanied witness later located the dog near Stakelums premises.

  Witness said the dog was “malnourished and thin, with her stomach in a sunken state.” Witness said the animal was underweight and had to be put on a special diet. The dog had been housed in “horrific conditions.” Ms Fitzgerald submitted a photograph of the dog in its condition at that time.

  In reply to Mr Brian Hughes, solicitor for defendant, witness said the bitch was feeding the pups.

  Mr Hughes – If the bitch’s health was not good shape she would not have been able to feed the pups.

  Witness – Yes, she was feeding the pups at that time, but, she was getting to the stage where she would not be able to do so.

  Witness agreed with Mr Hughes that the state of the dog was not due to violence having been inflicted on the animal.

  Mr Hughes said that his client had never been in trouble of this nature in the past. He had experienced some problems in his life, alcohol-related problems.   His client accepted that the dog was undernourished.

  Judge O’Neil submitted that the pups were in good health and the mother was feeding them.

  Judge – Notwithstanding her own condition the (dog) did look after the pups.

Judge O’Neil said he would have to convict defendant on the basis of the evidence before him. However, he would be as lenient as possible taking into account what Mr Hughes had stated about defendant.

  The Judge imposed a fined of €150 and ordered that defendant should hot have custody of or keep animals in the future.



Racecourse in Ireland cleared over five horse deaths in a day

Horsetalk.co.nz, 25/06/2014 

A racecourse in Ireland has been cleared over the deaths of five horses in a day during a meeting on June 13.

  Ireland’s Turf Club has concluded its investigation and found that the track at Clonmel Racecourse, in Tipperary, was not responsible for the deaths, noting that no trainer of jockey had blamed the track condition for the fatalities.

  The day of steeplechasing claimed the lives of Ballintotty Boy, Milan Elite, Oscar Pearl, Lisgreen Lad and Areyouforreal.

  The Turf Club, in announcing the findings of its inquiry, said it took into account events leading up to the race meeting and during the fixture.

  It said that in the lead-up to the fixture, the clerk of the course had carried out his pre-race day inspection at Clonmel on the morning of Wednesday, June 11. He then issued a message saying the ground was yielding following 11 millimetres of rain since Monday.

  The track foreman contacted the Turf Club press officer the next morning and a message was issued shortly after 8am saying that the ground was now good to yielding, with a forecast of warm and generally dry weather for that day and for Friday.

  A further ground update was issued at 8am on the morning of the meeting saying that the ground was now good following a dry and warm day on Thursday.

  The clerk of the course walked the course with the racetrack foreman at lunchtime on Friday and found the ground to be good, with a good covering of grass. The ground was officially given as good at that point, but was subsequently changed to good to firm after the fifth race.

  The investigation concluded that there had been no need to water the ground in the lead-up to the meeting.

  While there was no doubting the fact that the ground dried considerably on the day, no complaints were received by either the clerk of the course or the stewards from owners, trainers and riders regarding the condition of the ground.

  There were, the inquiry noted, three withdrawals due to the change in ground and in all cases the stewards allowed the withdrawals without penalty.

  No trainer or jockey attributed the fatalities to the state of the ground, the inquiry noted.



Sicko Stubs Out Ciggies On Dog

News of the World, 29/07/2007

These are the horrific pictures taken after a dog was found covered in CIGARETTE burns inflicted by an evil sadist.  The covering, 14-month-old greyhound – given the name Aaron by the owners of animal welfare group PAWS – was found last week with 27 burns all over its face and body.  It was taken to the rescue kennel in Mullinnahone, Co Tipperary, after being spotted wandering nearyby.  And shelter owners Gina and Tom Molloy said the sickening cruelty has left the poor pup scarred for life.


Cruelty

Tom, 43, said: “The person responsible still hasn’t been caught – what kind of person would inflict such cruelty on an animal? We’ll keep him with us for a few months until he’s well enough to be placed with a responsible owner who will give him the love he needs.”

  Sadly, the horrific cruelty inflicted on Aaron is just one of hundreds of cases seen by the kennel each year.

  Tome said: “Unfortunately, this kind of abuse is not unusual. We are seeing an increasing number of cases each week. We’re full to bursting point at the moment – we’re even having to keep dogs in our own house. We get €25,000 a year Government funding, but rely on the generosity of the public to meet the €400,000 running costs.”

Donations to PAS can be made to AIP in NAAS, Co Kildare. Account 07680026, sort code 933236.



New raids on puppy farms free animals in distress

A dog’s life…but is was never meant to be like this, full of cruelty and neglect

Irish Independent, 07/02/2004

An animal welfare group’s war against people running puppy farms continued in Laois and Offaly yesterday as 73 dogs, many in distress, were found during a two-day raid.  ISPCA officers, gardai and veterinary inspectors found 58 of the dogs at one particular location in Laois.  The dogs included newborn puppies, terriers, German Shepherds, collies, Labradors and Poms. Many were malnourished, mange-ridden and ulcerated.

  Ireland is the chief puppy farm location in Europe, and has no regulations governing the industry. Irish dogs are regularly sent to the UK or to the US.

  ISPCA officials hope the latest swoop in a nationwide clampdown on unregulated puppy farms will spur punters not to buy dogs from such dealers. On average each month the ISPCA raids one or two puppy farms which can house 10 to 500 animals.

  The ISPCA wants punishment for those who keep dogs in such conditions to be dealt with by the courts. Alastair Keen, ISPCA operations director, said many of the dogs were held in small cages with no real shelter or bedding.

  “We now want to see more consistency when these cases are brought to court and want (these) people to be banned from keeping dogs for life. Fines and even jail terms will not suffice,” he said.

Those involved in one raid waded through up to 12 inches of mud, fac6es and urine to locate the puppies. All the dogs are being catalogued and transported to the Ulster SPCA, as all the ISPCA’s facilities are full.  Officials are hoping all the dogs found in Co Laois will survive.

  Last week, gardai and animal cruelty inspectors removed 110 Dachshunds from a farm in north Co Tipperary where they were kept in freezing conditions without running water.  Twenty-one of the dogs were found in dark and cold conditions in boxes in an old cottage, while 17 puppies were found in cages in an old van used specifically for storage of animals.  Seventy-two other dogs were kept in an open yard in pens – some of which were made from old wooden pallets and rope. Brendan Hughes, another ISPCA inspector, said Ireland was infamous for being the “puppy farm capital” of Europe, and was home to cruel and barbaric breeders who sold the young dogs for massive profits.

  “It can be very, very lucrative when you realise that these people spend virtually no money on premises and they spend little or no money on veterinary care,” he told RTE radio.

He said a Cavalier Kind Charles Spaniel could sell for €300 to €350, and puppy farms were selling up to 700 dogs per year in the UK and the US.

  Mr Hughes said the ISPCA depended on tip-offs from the public. “Without those people contacting us directly we would never know about these things because most of these puppy farms are in out-of-the-way places,” he said.

  “They are very secretive because the conditions are so bad and people don’t want anybody to know what kind of conditions they are keeping these animals in.”



Ex garda ‘took hurl to pet dog’

He was one of a number of people arrested by internal affairs detectives probing the leaking of sensitive police information to the IRA.

  The High Court awarded him the money over the affair but the Supreme Court has now ruled he was not entitled the compo.  Now it can also be revealed that he has appeared in court accused of cruelty and battering a neighbour’s pet with a hurley.

  Walsh denied beating and killing the 10-year-old sheep-dog owned by his elderly neighbours, Philip and Kathleen Doyle, on October 11 last year.  But he subsequently agreed a pay to undisclosed charity donation to the SPCA to avoid conviction.

  Nenagh District Court heard Walsh had intervened in a row between his sheep-dog and the dog owned by the Doyles.


Evidence

In evidence, Mr Doyle said his dog Rex was lying outside his gate when Mr Walsh’s pet ran up and attacked him.  He said Walsh followed up behind and proceed to strike his dog with a hurley “with all his force” on three of four occasions.

  Mr Doyle said the retired garda then walked into a nearby school with his dog and shouted to him that he was sorry that his dog had died of a “heart attack”.  Mrs Doyle said she had been “dumbfounded” by Mr Walsh’s actions.

  The court heard both dogs had a history of fighting, and according to Walsh, had been involved in “thousands of skirmishes” since the Doyles moved to the estate a number of years previously.

  Walsh told the court that the dog had been removed by the SPCA to University College Dublin for a post-mortem examination, but the cause of death turned out to be inconclusive.

  His solicitor, Michael Collins, speculated the dog could have died of “shock” as a result of the fight.

  Walsh told the court he was “deeply upset” by the charge levelled against him and said he had been and animal lover all his life.  He agreed to pay an undisclosed sum of money to the Roscrea branch of the SPCA.  The proposal was accepted by the Doyles and no conviction was recorded against Mr Walsh in respect of the charge.

Walsh (63), of Oaklawn Drive, Nenagh, Co Tipperary, was awarded €175,000 by the High Court in May 2003 after it ruled he and a separated mother-of-four, Kay   Bedford, were wrongfully arrested and detained 14 years ago on suspicion of being members of the IRA.  However, the State subsequently appealed the award and the Supreme Court yesterday overturned the judgement which rule in favour of Walsh.



Dog-killer accused to make charity donation

Irish Independent, 20/07/2005

A retired garda accused of beating a dog to death with a hurley agreed to pay compensation to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals yesterday.

  Anslem Walsh denied killing the 10-year-old dog owned by his elderly neighbours, Phillip and Kathleen Doyle.

  Mr Doyle said his dog, Rex, was lying outside his gate on October 11 last year when Mr Walsh’s pet ran up and attacked him. He said Mr Walsh followed up behind and proceeded to strike his dog with a hurley “with all his force” on three of four occasions.

  Mr Walsh, of Oaklawn Drive, Nenagh, told the court he was “deeply upset” by the charge. He apologised for the incident and said his only intention was to separate the dogs.

  He agreed to pay an undisclosed sum of money to the Roscrea branch of the SPCA. The proposal was accepted by the Doyle and no conviction was recorded.



Worst case of animal cruelty seen in Ireland

Irish Sun, 09/10/2007

A father and son have pleaded guilty to the worst case of animal cruelty ever seen in Ireland. A cop found starving horses with no grass or fodder next to the carcasses of four dead animals at a site rented by Simon O' Dwyer and his son, also called Simon.  

  Three horses had to be put down while the remaining 25 were taken into care by the Irish Horse Welfare Trust, a judge at Carrick-on-Suir District Court , Co. Tipperary heard.  

  Just a month later, 51 cattle and one live horse were found in shocking conditions along with the carcasses of four cattle and one horse at the O' Dwyer' Mullinbeg farm.  

 An investigation by Garda Sgt Stephen O' Sullivan resulted in the seizure of the cattle. Judge Terence Flynn called the animal cruelty the worse he had ever seen in his time working on the bench.  

  O' Dwyer Snr, 61 and 21-year-old O' Dwyer, Jnr of Knocktoper, Co. Kilkenny were given four-months suspended jail sentences. They were also fined €3,000 each and ordered to pay €38,000 to the Irish Horse Welfare Trust as a contribution to nursing their animals plus €2,000 for carcass disposal and €540 vet fees.  

  A Trust spokesman said: "We are looking for kind and experienced homes for the horses."



Growth in dog fighting rings sparks appeal for crackdown.

Irish Independent, 05/05/2009

Tamer dogs such as greyhounds are often used as "bait" during the training phase of a fighting-dog's career, giving the animal a taste for blood and some practice in fighting. Two abandoned, severely-injured greyhounds, found in the last week in the Clonmel area are thought to have been used as training material for fighting dogs. Gardai and the Tipperary SPCA are currently investigating the discoveries. "One dog was quite literally torn open," said Mark Hickey of the TSPCA. "It was still alive when we found it but had to be put down by the vet because the injury was so bad. It [the tear] started below the rib cage, and continued down into the dog's side and into the groin." Another greyhound/whippet, aged about five, found around the same time had up to 80 puncture wounds -- consistent with being repeatedly attacked by a fighting dog. "He was also brought to the vet but died of shock," said Hickey. The first dog, thought to have been between two and three years old, was originally a racing greyhound as it had an official tattoo, and the SPCA have asked Bord na gCon for help in tracing its owners.



€6,000 bill for cramping dogs.

Irish Independent, 03/09/2006

A man who transported greyhounds from Ireland to England to race them has been ordered to pay £4,000 (€6,000) towards the cost of his prosecution after he appeared before an English court accused of carrying them in cramped cages. Bernard Martin McBride of Ardmayle Cashel, Co Tipperary, pleaded guilty when he appeared before magistrates in Bristol yesterday, to a transit offence in relation to 10 greyhounds. The court heard how the police pulled over a white Mercedes van in August last year and found it contained rows and rows of caged dogs, with further rows behind them. Animal welfare inspector Glyn Roberts, who was called to assist, found the dogs in small, stacked cages, some of which were just 32.28 inches high. One black and white greyhound had been transported in a collapsible travel cage which was lower in height than the peak of the dog's back bone - let alone his head carriage, she said.