Shooting

Farmer is fined 50p for killing tots’ pet dog.

Irish Mirror, 29/04/1999

John O’Connell (63) of Ballymore, Cobh killed Belinda, the children’s dog and Harvey a neighbour’s dog as the sisters aged 5 & 6 screamed in horror.   see more


Farmer wins appeal on pups shooting sentence

Irish Examiner, 17/1/2003
A farmer who shot two greyhounds pups owned by his neighbour after they worried his cattle successfully appealed at Waterford Circuit Court yesterday (16/01/03) against the severity of a sentence previously imposed on him at the district court.  see more

Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot.

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003.

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the dog beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car. Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70), pleaded with Oliver Byrne (57) from Aghaloughan, near Carrickmacross, not to shoot the dog, which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car, where it was hiding, and discharged his shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs. Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog. Judge Brennan fined him £100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms’ certificate.



Foolish riflemen shot 18 goats dead

Irish Independent, 27/03/2003
Three members of a gun club who admitted shooting dead nearly 20 goats have been ordered to pay €6,000.  see more


Munster Express, 11/4/2003
John O'Connor weekly column

Ancient law invoked against man who shot at crow I have always felt a little nervous and uncomfortable around guns and I think it is only right and proper that the gardai are vigilant when it comes to granting or revoking firearm licences. That said, I thought a young man from County Offaly was rather harshly treated last week when he appeared in court following a complaint made by a member of the public. Garda J.K. Sheehy told Judge Thomas Fitzpatrick that the 20-year-old defendant, who had no previous convictions, pulled his jeep into a gateway at the side of the road before getting out and shooting into the field at the crow. However the driver of another vehicle objected to what was happening and made a complaint to the gardai. Superintendent Charles Devine told the Court the defendant could have been charged under the Public Order Act but it was deemed more appropriate to prosecute him on the lesser charge of 'discharging a weapon within sixty feet of the centre of a public road'. Defence solicitor Bernadette Owens said her client admitted that he had fired at the crow but, because he was in the recess of a gateway, he did not think he was on the public road. As a consequence of his action, the gun had been confiscated and his firearm licence revoked. The Act under which the defendant was prosecuted is the Summary Jurisdiction Act of 1851 which has a maximum fine of ten shillings so Judge Fitzpatrick felt obliged to call a calculator before imposing a fine of 63 cent to be paid forthwith. The court wasn't told why the man shot at the poor old crow in the first place and whether or not the defendant actually hit the bird with his shot.



Evening Herald, 18/12/2003

A man who shot two wild geese near a north Dublin bird sanctuary by “pure accident” for hunting protected wildlife. Gerard McHale (22) of Springvalley, Summerhill, Co. Meath, was fined at Balbriggan District Court for killing the protected Brent geese, contrary to the Wildlife act in an incident at Rogerstown, Lusk, on January 19th 2003. Defence solicitor, Michael A. Regan, said his client did not know the birds were Brent geese when he shot them. “I have shot with him myself and he’s not a very good shot,” Mr. Regan told the court. “He’s fired 15 times at the one bird circling around and missed it every time. He shot these wild geese by pure accident, it must have been suicide. The geese should be up in court for contributory negligence.”


Hunters kill protected deer and calf.

Evening Herald, 7/1/2004

A deer and its calf were butchered by two English hunters armed with high powered rifles. Simon Everett (43) and Nicholas Pancisi (44) were caught by Kerry gardai. “They had shot the deer, gutted it and then shot its young and removed the hind quarters,” Inspector Michael O’Donovan said. The Red Deer were a protected species in this area “and should not have been shot” said the garda.  Both men pleaded guilty to the charge of hunting a protected species at Kilgarvan, south Kerry, were fined €800 each and their two rifles worth £2,500 each confiscated.



Hunter fined €500 over shotgun blast at rabbit.

Irish Independent, 10/07/2004

A Hunter who blew a hole in a family home while hunting rabbits with a shotgun in a town centre at 3am when intoxicated has been fined €500. Timothy Coakley from Inchigeelagh, who appeared before Cork Circuit Criminal Court yesterday pleaded guilty to a charge of reckless endangerment with a firearm. Coakley admitted that he had been trying to shoot rabbits along the main street of Dunmanway when he accidently blasted the family home on August 7th. Council for the hunter insisted that the incident was a case of ‘drunken bravado’.



Shot 4O birds in cruel attack

The Nationalist, 21/8/1999

A horrible act of animal cruelty was carried out in a farmyard in Bagenalstown last week. Approximately 40 pigeons were slaughtered. The perpetrators walked into a person’s farmyard and shot the birds for no apparent reason. These pigeons had nested and bred in the farmyard for many years and were almost tame. After the slaughter took place the carcasses of the birds were left on the ground. This is not only a case of cruelty to animals, because the perpetrators of this act trespassed on private land and could have endangered human life. It was evident that a shotgun was involved. The gardai are following a definite line of inquiry and are confident that the people who carried out this act will be brought to justice.



Greyhounds shot and dumped in Limerick quarry after poor trials

Limerick Leader, 02/05/2013

THE OWNER of greyhounds that were shot and dumped in a quarry in County Limerick refused to tell gardai who killed the animals, a court has heard.  see more



Investigation begins after injured buzzard found
Breaking News.ie,10/12/2012
An investigation is underway after a young buzzard was shot in Co Meath.  The bird of prey was found alive in the Rossnaree area, but was unable to fly having been hit by a number of shot pellets.  The bird had to be put down."Buzzards are protected birds of prey. The National Parks and Wildlife service is asking anyone with detail about the shooting to contact the conservation ranger in Navan, Co Meath or Gardaí.Annette Lynch, conservation manager with the NPWS, said that it is an offence to shoot these birds.  "When the wildlife act was introduced in 1976 it made it an offence to shoot or poison any of these birds of prey," she said.  "It made a good comeback, and they are actually going further and further south.  "When I started in the job in 1999, I'd pull over when I see a buzzard, whereas I suppose I do see them more regularly now, which is great, but that's because they've been protected."


Silencer on a deer hunter's weapon
Wicklow People newspaper,13/06/2012
 
A MAN WHO had a silencer on a gun while out illegally hunting deer had his case adjourned until July at last Tuesday's sitting of Baltinglass District Court.  Paddy Cullen, 9 Harbour View, Wexford was charged with an offence under the Wildlife Act on December 29, 2010 and again on January 26, 2011.  He pleaded guilty to the charges and the court heard on December 29, 2010 John Kelly who had leased the deer shooting rights for a wooded area met Cullen carrying a gun 500 meters inside the wood.  He challenged Cullen who said he had permission from a farmer to shoot.
  On January 26, 2011 in a different area Andrew Ryan who had leased the deer shooting rights for that area met Cullen with a rifle and a silencer 200 meters inside the wood.  Mr. Ryan told Cullen he had no permission to be there and asked him to leave.
  Cullen told Judge David Kennedy he didn't realise he had no permission to be on the lands shooting.  'I don't accept that for a second,' said Judge Kennedy.  He adjourned the case until July 3 to allow gardai time to check if Cullen had permission to use a silencer on his rifle.


Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds
The Irish Times, 12/04/2012
The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention
of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”. Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.



Warning: Graphic content - Athlone SPCA appeals for witnesses after dog's head blown off

Independent.ie, 02/12/2013

Athlone SPCA has appealed for information following the discovery of a dog which was shot in the head in the town.  see more 



Athlone SPCA says dogs dumped weekly on motorway

Shannonside FM, 02/12/2013

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Athlone says that animals are being dumped on a daily basis in the area. The group has made an appeal for witnesses after a husky dog was shot 4 times over the weekend. The dead animal was discovered by a passer-by on the road in the popular Glynwood Bog area on Sunday afternoon.

  Chairperson of the SPCA Billy Gallagher says the incident has been handed over to the Gardai but they fear that the animal was dumped after failed attempts to sell the dog. Mr. Gallagher says that while this case is extreme people are dumping animals along the motorway on a weekly basis: Billy Gallagher is appealing for people to contact the Gardai if they have further information.  He’s reminding people that it is an offence to abandon and of course shoot an animal except in some circumstances where farmers are permitted to do so.



Publican fired shots at hounds on his land

Irish Examiner, 07/01/2012

A PUBLICAN at breaking point took the law into his own hands when foxhounds from a harriers club strayed onto his land in Co Cork and he fired at the dogs. Detective Garda Pat Condon said the club was not hunting on the land but that their pack of over 30 hounds strayed on to it. Fifteen of the dogs were injured, while four others were never found and it was assumed they were shot and died. Michael O’Connell, aged 51, of Ardnaleac, Ballingully, Co Cork, pleaded guilty at Cork District Court yesterday to charges of cruelty to animals by wounding of dogs by shooting with an air rifle loaded with .22 calibre lead pellets. He also pleaded guilty to a related charge of unlawfully and maliciously wounding dogs. 

  Defence solicitor Frank Buttimer said O’Connell had complained numerous times about dogs coming on to his lands prior to the incident on February 22, 2009, and that he reached breaking point when he saw the foxhounds that day. Mr Buttimer described it as a most beautiful location in terms of flora and fauna and that the defendant was trying to let it develop as a safe habitat for badgers and other wildlife. The rural lands overlook the EMC property in the Ovens area. 

  “He had problems with the ingress of dogs and the amount of destruction they caused. It was probably at breaking point. The charges are confined to wounding and causing damage to animals. Other serious stuff is not levelled against him. His purpose was not to injure the dogs but to protect the habitat,” said Mr Buttime.

  Judge Leo Malone said he would dismiss the charges under the Probation Act on payment of €2,000 to Marymount Hospice and the vet’s expenses for appearing in court yesterday for what was listed as a trial before O’Connell’s plea of guilty. The judge complimented Waterfall Harrier Club for indicating it would pay its own veterinary costs and forego witness expenses.



Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the injured animal dead beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car.

Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court (28/01/03) that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70) pleaded with Oliver Byrne (37) from Aghaloughan near Carrickmacross not to shoot the dog which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car where it was hiding and discharged the shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs.

Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog.

Judge Brenann fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate.



Irish Examiner, 29/01/2003

A farmer who chased a dog he had already wounded with a gunshot into a neighbour’s yard and then shot it dead in front of an elderly woman, a court heard yesterday. Judge Flann Brennan was told pensioner Katheleen Marron, aged 70, who was sitting in a car under which the dog was hiding, pleaded with Oliver Byrne, aged 57, from Aghloughan near Carrickmacross Co. Monaghan, not to shoot it.

However, he dragged the animal out and shot it in the head. Byrne pleaded guilty through defence lawyer Brendan Lareny at Carrickmacross Disttict Court to a charge of recklessly discharging a firearm at the farmyard killing the dog. The accused solicitor said his client’s livestock were being harassed by dogs and this led him to taking such “drastic action” with his legally held shotgun on the occasion. He since regretted taking such a course of action.

Judge Brennan fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate in the future.



Farmer wins appeal on pups shooting sentence

Irish Examiner, 17/01/2003

a farmer who shot two greyhounds pups owned by his neighbour after 3)they worried his cattle successfully appealed at Waterford Circuit Court yesterday (16/03/2001) against the severity of a sentence previously imposed on him at the district court.

Nicholas Kenneally, Smartcastle, Kilmacow Co. Kilkenny has received a three-month suspended sentence and was fined €700 for cruelty, ill-treating the 15-week-old pups on July 6, 2001. Bernard Fox said he had more than 20 greyhounds and that there was “bad blood” between the two families. One of the pups died and the other had to be put down later. Veterinary surgeon George Kinsella said the pups were in a state of complete collapse after the incident with up to 20 pellets under their skin.

Mr. Kenneally said he saw 25 to 30 of his cattle excited and running with three dogs chasing them and swinging from their tails. The cattle ran through wire fences and gate and the farmer said he had no alternative but to get the gun and fire at the dogs. He said for the last 10 years he had endured continuous problems with dogs following his cattle and some sheep had been killed.

Judge Michael O’Shea said yesterday that it would have been impossible for the pups to worry the cattle so as to give reasonable apprehension that injury would be caused to the animals. Discharging the gun was, he said, reckless and unreasonable behaviour.

The judge said however that he would withdraw the suspended prison sentence and reduce the fine by €100 to €600. He said there was no evidence that Mr. Kenneally was a risk with a gun and he was satisfied that he remained a suitable person to hold a licensed firearm. The judge directed that the weapon be returned to the farmer.



Farmer is fined for the reckless use of shotgun

Irish Examiner, 16/01/1998

A Galway man who blasted in a neighbour’s front door with a shotgun while attempting to shoot a god he believed was worrying his sheep was fined and had his gun confiscated at Athernry Court this week.

  Indeed, the dog did not even belong to the owners of the house in which the door was blasted with the shotgun and local Gardai said it was amazing that nobody was injured in the midnight shooting.

  Dermot Monaghan, Ivy Mount, Knochaunglass, Athenry, was convicted at the local court this week of reckless discharge of a firearm after he had tracked down a dog he had shot to a neighbour’s door and fired at it.

  The Court was not informed as to how the dog fared or if it survived the ordeal but the blast did considerable damage to the door the dog was standing outside and the defendant was ordered to pay £400 compensation to the owner of the damaged house.

  Giving evidence Garda Sgt Michael Corry said that at approximately 3.30 am on September 21 last he responded to a call and arrived at the home of James Ruane at Knockaunglass, Athenry.

  He saw that the front door of his house was shattered and Mr Ruane handed him five pellets he had found inside. On investigation a large number of pellet marks were found.

  He went to tell the Court that the defendant had visited the Ruane household the previous evening to complain about dogs worrying his sheep. At about midnight on the night of the incident the defendant shot and wounded a dog which he believed was worrying his sheep.

  He tracked the wounded animal and discharged shots at it.

  Emmet Fitzgerald solicitor (defending) said his client was recognised as an up-standing member of the community but he had been having ongoing problems with dogs worrying his sheep and he had lost some sheep because of this in the past. He said this did not excuse his recklessness with a firearm but explained why he felt he had to take action to protect his flock.

  Judge Al O’Dea imposed a fine of £500 for the reckless discharge of a firearm and ordered the confiscation of the shotgun and ammunition. He also fined Mr. Monaghan £350 for causing damage to property and ordered to pay £400 in compensation for the damage caused. He was allowed two months to pay or two months in jail in default.

  When the defence solicitor asked for a review on the gun confiscation order the Judge said it would be better to leave that matter in the hands of the Garda sergeant.



Foolish riflemen shot 18 goats dead

Irish Independent, 27/03/2003

Three members of a gun club who admitted shooting dead nearly 20 goats have been ordered to pay €c6,000. John Collins, Diarmid O’Neill and Aidan Shannon with addressed in Drimoleague Co. Cork pleaded guilty to two counts of criminal damages over the shooting of 18 goats last April. The men initially entered a not guilty plea at Skibbereen District Court earlier this month, claiming they had been asked to kill the goats by a local farmer.

  They told the court Padraig Collins asked them to kill the animals because they were causing damage to land and crops near Drimoleague. Dunmanway District Court heard yesterday the defendants shot the goats with a rifle in the forest on April 6 last year. Ten days later a local man found a wounded goat in the forest and contac6ted the gardai. The animal had to be put down. A garda was launched and the men were arrested.

  Judge James O’Connor was shown pictures of the dead animals, which belonged to Kenneth Coombes and Jerry Collins.

  Judge O’Connor described the defendants as “foolish”. The men’s solicitor, Gerard Corcoran, said his clients believed they were eliminating a pest problem.   Judge O’Connor ordered the men to pay a total of €6,000 to the ISPCA, the Court Poor Box, the owners and the Garda Benevolent Fund. Sentencing was

Adjourned until March 24, 2004.



Trio changes pleas, admit shooting dead 20 goats

Irish Independent, 12/03/2003

Three men changed their pleas yesterday and admitted shooting dead more than 20 goats.

  John Collins, Aidan Shannon and Diarmuid O’Neill, with addresses in Drimoleague, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to criminal damage there on April 6, 2000.

  The men, members of a gun club, initially pleaded not guilty at Skibbereen district court, saying they were asked to kill the goats by a local farmer, but changed pleas yesterday evening.

  One goat survived the shooting but had to be put down by a vet and a Garda investigation was launched.

  The men agreed to pay €16,000 compensation to owners Gerard Collins and Kenneth Coombes.  Judge James O’Connor adjourned the case until March 26 at Dunmanway district court and remanded all three of the defendants on continuing bail.



Three admit goat herd massacre

The Star, 12/03/2003

Three gun club members pleaded guilty yesterday to charge over the massacre of a herd of goats.

  Skibbereen District Court in west Cork was told 28 goats were shot by a group of men on April 6, 2001.  Three of the group, Aidan Shannon (25) of Donovan Road, Drimoleague, John Collins from nearby West End and another man – all members of Island Valley Gun Club – pleaded guilty yesterday to causing criminal damage.  Judge O’Connor heard that the goats were shot in a wooded area at Lietra with .22 magnum rifles after the animals were blamed for crop damage estimated at €800.

  Shannon told Gardai the goats had been behind the ear.  They had been piled in a heap after the hour-long massacre.

  “As far as we were concerned they were all dead,” he said.

The court was told most of the goats were shot once, but some had to be shot twice.  Local resident and artist Ann Dex called Gardai after an injured goat was seen roaming woodland 11 days after the culling.


Distressed

She told the court she saw a goat “in a distressed state with a hole in its head and in its jaw.”  A vet later put down the wounded animal.

  Investigators later found three more dead goats in the area – including a young animal that had died of starvation and two others which were badly decomposed.


Compensation

After their plea, Gardai gave an assurance that they would not revoke the accused men’s gun licenses.  Judge James O’Connor said the men were “very foolish to have destroyed the animals.”

  “Some of this party were members of a gun club and were asked to do a job they believed was justified,” he said.

  “They didn’t give a damn – it was shoot, shoot, shoot, end of story.”

He adjourned the case so the men could pay €1,600 compensation to farmers Kenneth Coombes and Jerry Collins.



Animal gang with guns

We conclude that they acted either from stupidity, laziness, or a perversion they enjoyed as ‘sport’

Irish Examiner, 24/03/2001

see more


Sheep farmer accused of shooting neighbour’s dog

Irish Independent, 09/02/2005

A farmer appeared in court yesterday charged with shooting his neighbour’s pet dog.

  Sean O’Shea, with an address at East Hill House, Glasson, Athlone, Co Westmeath, was charged with discharging a firearm near a public road. The farmer had claimed he had shot the dog because the animal was worrying his sheep.  And in a separate incident, the farmer was also charged with allowing a dead heifer lie on his land.

  David Henshaw told the court that on February 26 last year, he let his red setter dog out at about 1.30pm. However, at about 3.30pm that evening he got a call from a neighbour to say that his dog was dying on her front lawn.

  Mr Henshaw came home and found the dog dying and with a hole under his chin. He confronted a neighbour, Mr O’Shea, because he knew he had shot dogs in the past.

  Mr O’Shea claimed he had shot the dog from a shed on his land. However, the court heard evidence that the dog had died on a neighbour’s front lawn.  Noreen O’Rourke told the court that she had come home from work at about 3pm and 15 minutes later she heard her children screaming after they got off their school bus. She saw the dog dying in her front garden.

  Mr Henshaw took pictures of the scene, including a blood trail, which was several hundred feet away from where Mr O’Shea said he shot the dog. The case was adjourned for a week.



Shot birds horror for stunned golfers

The Sun, 11/02/2005

Glofers set for a round at a posh club got a shock when dead and dying birds rained down on the course. Marcus O’Brien, from Libmerick, said he and his pals heard a series of shots as they arrived to tee off at Dromoland Castle Golf Club.

  He said: We were forced to watch the horrendous slaughter of some of the most beautiful wildlife. “We were captive on the tee for 20 minutes, while dead and partly dismemberd birds rained down.”

  Marcus claims gun dogs then ran in and “finished off” the dying birds at the five-star Co Clare resort.

  The fairways were left littered with mutilated birds and used cartridges. Marcus said: “Our game of golf was ruined and I have been left with terrible images. We’d just gone for quiet round.”

  Dromoland Castle refused to comment. But it is understood management have contacted some players who were on the course at the weekend and apologised for any distress they suffered.

  Organised shooting – along with golf, tennis, fishing, and boating – is among the activities offered by the resort.



Pheasant shooter handed €130 fine

Bray People, 19/01/2007

A man who shot a pheasant in his front garden, was fined €130 for killing a protected wild bird out of season by Judge Donnchadh O Buachalla at Wexford District Court.

  Colm Davis of Courtclough Upper, Blackwater admitted the offence which happened at his home on May 3 last year.

  A garda witness told the court that the defendant was upstairs at home when he saw a pheasant in his front garden.  He had a firearm and took out the gun and shot the bird.  He was unaware of the fact that it was outside of the shooting season and the pheasant was a protected wild bird.

  The defendant told the court that he apologised sincerely and said he didn’t know he was doing wrong.

  The garda told the court that the defendant had two firearms licences and both of them were revoked following the incident.



Farmers hang dead dog on gate

Evening Herald, 20/04/2006

This is the brutal sight which greeted motorists as they passed through a busy farming community plagued by dog attacks.

  Furious with the ongoing problem of sheep killings, farmers in Monaghan tied a dead Labrador dog to a gate alongside slain sheep.

  The horrific display was organised by frustrated farmers, furious at the latest killings of their flocks.

  However, it was met with shock from animal welfare groups, who described the protest as “gruesome”.

  Tina Boyle, an inspector with the ISPCA in Cavan, said she did not believe putting dead animals on public display was the correct way to tackle the problem.

  The Irish Farmers Association also expressed shock at the manner in which the dead dog had been put on public display.

  A spokesman admitted: “I think there would be unease about that.”

  Henry Byrnes, the IFA’s national sheep committee chairman, said: “Every flock owner has the right to defend his sheep but we would not condone putting dead animals on display.”

The dog was shot by a farmer who intercepted a pack of hounds as they targeted his sheep.



Sheep farmers shot dogs dead

Irish Examiner,  20/02/2015

Sheep farmers shot dead hunting dogs after lambs were slaughtered. The dogs, including beagles and cross-breeds, had been on a supervised hunt in Co Clare.

 But eight dogs broke away from the pack and attacked sheep on two separate farms in Broadford.

 The county’s dog warden Frankie Coote said yesterday the dogs killed two sheep and injured several more.

But more would possibly have been slaughtered, only for the alertness of farmers. He said the farmers, who notifiied the authorities, were acting within their rights. The lambing season is currently at its peak.

 Mr Coote said: “More than likely a deer brought them through the land and once they came on the young lambs, that was it.

 “Even supervised, if they come on a deer, it can bring them anywhere. That’s what we believe happened. There are a lot of deer in that area.”

Mr Coote said the owner of the dogs had been identified. “The owner was with the dogs when they lost the pack. This is unusual for hunting dogs to do but all dogs will do it,” he explained.

 “There were two farms. One was alerted and he went to his farm. Four of the dogs were shot while attacking the sheep.

 “Then they went up to check the neighbour’s farm and there were four more dogs up there, attacking sheep.”

The dog warden said the attacks has long-term consequences for farmers. “All of those sheep were ready to lamb. You don’t know now whether they’ll have dead lambs or other problems.”

 The incidents have been reported to gardaí.

 “It’s completely legal to shoot dogs once livestock has been attacked, once the landowner notifies the dog warden or the gardaí immediately. They contacted me and I went down and removed the carcasses. I’m now in the process of meeting the owner.”

 Mr Coote said he had never previously came across such a large number of dogs being shot together.

 “This is the most, although I’ve seen dogs shot that did a lot more damage. The reason there wasn’t more damage was the farmers had been alerted and came on them. Otherwise the dogs would have slaughtered what was there. There is no winners in this,” he reflected.



Sheep farmers shot dogs dead

Irish Examiner, 20/02/ 2015

Sheep farmers shot dead hunting dogs after lambs were slaughtered. The dogs, including beagles and cross-breeds, had been on a supervised hunt in Co Clare.

  But eight dogs broke away from the pack and attacked sheep on two separate farms in Broadford.

  The county’s dog warden Frankie Coote said yesterday the dogs killed two sheep and injured several more.

  But more would possibly have been slaughtered, only for the alertness of farmers. He said the farmers, who notifiied the authorities, were acting within their rights. The lambing season is currently at its peak.

  Mr Coote said: “More than likely a deer brought them through the land and once they came on the young lambs, that was it.

  “Even supervised, if they come on a deer, it can bring them anywhere. That’s what we believe happened. There are a lot of deer in that area.

  Mr Coote said the owner of the dogs had been identified. “The owner was with the dogs when they lost the pack. This is unusual for hunting dogs to do but all dogs will do it,” he explained.

  “There were two farms. One was alerted and he went to his farm. Four of the dogs were shot while attacking the sheep.

  “Then they went up to check the neighbour’s farm and there were four more dogs up there, attacking sheep.”

The dog warden said the attacks has long-term consequences for farmers. “All of those sheep were ready to lamb. You don’t know now whether they’ll have dead lambs or other problems.”

  The incidents have been reported to gardaí.

  “It’s completely legal to shoot dogs once livestock has been attacked, once the landowner notifies the dog warden or the gardaí immediately. They contacted me and I went down and removed the carcasses. I’m now in the process of meeting the owner.”

  Mr Coote said he had never previously came across such a large number of dogs being shot together.

  “This is the most, although I’ve seen dogs shot that did a lot more damage. The reason there wasn’t more damage was the farmers had been alerted and came on them. Otherwise the dogs would have slaughtered what was there. There is no winners in this,” he reflected.



Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

I  nspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

  “It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

  The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

  “The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

  IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”



Unwanted Greyhounds shot for 10 Euro.

Irish Sun, 21/05/2009  

An Irish greyhound executioner called Larry Earle has been exposed in the Irish Sun ... Earle of Camolin, County Wexford admitted killing greyhounds with a captive bolt gun for 10 euros a time. He said ‘a bolt gun that’s it, end of story them they’re sent to the rendering plant. He refused to say how many greyhounds he kills a year.


Wild heifer shot dead at Kilmallock mart

Independent.ie, 13/08/2014

A LIMERICK mart was forced to shoot a heifer that became completely unmanageable during its weekly sale at Kilmallock last week.

  Mart manager, PJ Buckley made the decision to shoot the Limousin heifer in the interests of public health and safety.

  Over 1,000 animals were going under the hammer at Kilmallock on the day and over 200 buyers were present at the time of the incident which happened just after lunchtime at Monday's sale last week.

  The last time such drastic action was required at Kilmallock was over 12 years ago, according to mart spokesman, Denis Buckley.

  The heifer, which was one of a draft sent to the mart by a local farmer, became unruly in her pen and broke out into the coral area which adjoins the mart.

  Several attempts by mart staff to coax the unruly animal back into her pen were unsuccessful and soon it became obvious that drastic action would have to be considered.

  "The animal could have crossed an area which was used by staff and people attending the mart and as you know humans and animals do not match in this type of situation," explained Mr Kirby.

  "There have been too many farm accidents this year and the mart was not going to be responsible for another agri-related accident. It all became a question of being safe rather than sorry," he added.

When it became obvious that the animal could not be restrained the mart called in a competent local rifleman, and he dispatched the heifer into a ditch adjoining the pens with a single shot.

  Buyers and sellers attending the mart were unaware of what was going on outside and business at the weekly sale was unaffected by the incident.

  Similar Limousin heifers currently command an average price of €1,100 and the mart management subsequently came to an agreement with the vendor farmer on compensation for the shot heifer.

  The remaining animals in the farmer's draft were successfully sold later at the mart.

  "This is a very rare incident. The animal was not kicking 
or bawling but became completely unmanageable," said Mr Kirby.



Young peregrine falcon shot down on one of its first flights

Breaking News.ie, 13/08/2014

A young peregrine falcon has been shot down in Co Wexford.

  The bird - which was on one of its first flights - was shot with a shotgun at Ballynastraw near Enniscorthy. It had to be put down as a result of its injuries.

  An X-ray has confirmed the falcon was shot with shotgun pellets in its wing and leg. An identification ring placed on the bird’s leg in June of this year showed that it was a young bird on one of its first flights.

  The Parks and Wildlife Service is appealing for the public's help as the bird is a protected species, and shooting them is a criminal offence.

  Dominic Berridge from the Service said: "There seems to have been an increase in the deliberate killing of peregrines in recent years with several unexplained nest failures in the south-east. The finding of this bird is not an isolated incident.

  "There have been attempts to poison and shoot birds at a number of nests…If people see anything suspicious like a tethered pigeons or a trap, NPWS staff should be called."

  The Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Heather Humphreys TD, added: "It is intolerable for protected birds of prey to be persecuted, poisoned or shot.

"Not only is this activity illegal and barbaric, it also harms our reputation as a country that values its wildlife. I would urge anyone to report such incidents to the National Parks and Wildlife Service in my Department."



Appeal after peregrine falcon illegally shot in Co WexfordProtected bird of prey had to be euthanised by parks service due to severity of injuries

Irish Times, 13/08/2014

The National Parks and Wildlife Service is has appealed for information after a young peregrine falcon was illegally shot in Co Wexford.

  The native bird of prey had to be euthanised by the parks service after it was found shot at Ballynastraw near Enniscorthy due to the severity of its injuries.

  X-rays showed that the bird was hit with shotgun pellets in its wings and leg, the Department of Arts and Heritage said in a statement. Vets said the injuries were so bad that rehabilitation was unlikely.

  The falcon was young and on one of its first flights, according to an identification ring on its leg.

  The parks service has raised concern about an increase in the deliberate killings of peregrines in recent years. It said there were several unexplained nest failures in the south-east.

  “The finding of this bird is not an isolated incident. There have been attempts to poison and shoot birds at a number of nests and if people see anything suspicious like a tethered pigeons or a trap, NPWS staff should be called,”Dominic Berridge of the Wexford Wildfowl Reserve at the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NWPS) said.

  It was “intolerable” for birds of prey and other wildlife “to be persecuted, poisoned or shot,”Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys said in a statement.

  “Not only is this activity illegal and barbaric, it also harms our reputation as a country that values its wildlife,” she said. She urged the public to report incidents to the NPWS.

  Peregrine falcons are a protected species and receive high legal protection under law . The killing of them is a criminal offence.

  Anyone with information which could assist the investigation is asked to contact Mr Berridge at 076-1002660



Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds

Irish Times, 12/04/2014

The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”.

  Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.



Gardai seize deer's head as Operation Bambi hits poachers

Irish Independent, 22/04/2014

This is the deer's head that has been seized as part of an investigation into poaching code-named Operation Bambi.

  The discovery was made by Tallaght gardai when five officers entered a house last Friday week after they obtained a warrant under the Wildlife Act.

  It is understood that the head belonged to a deer that was poached using two lurchers and a spotlight in the Dublin Mountains.

  Sources have revealed that gardai were alerted to the situation after an image of the deer's head was placed on Facebook.

  Operation Bambi, being conducted by gardai and the National Parks and Wildlife Service, is co-ordinated by Insp Martin Walker who is based at Carlow garda station.

  It is understood that the Facebook image of the deer's head was sent to Insp Walker who was passed on the information to colleagues in Tallaght who then conducted a search of the house.

  Commenting on the seizure, Damien Hogan, the secretary of the Wild Deer Association of Ireland said: "The Wild Deer Association of Ireland welcomes this development and would like to thank all involved."

  "There has been a significant increase in the number of successful prosecutions and detections in recent months, and we would encourage our members and supporters to continue to report suspected incidents of deer poaching."

The Herald revealed last December that a gang that gardai targeted was responsible for poaching up to 200 deer after boasts about their exploits were posted on Facebook.

  The deer hunters has been operating without licences in counties Wicklow, Carlow and Kilkenny and were under investigation by gardai since the start of the season last September.

  Senior sources said that one suspect used Facebook to boast he has killed 15 deer in one night, and that gardai would not catch him.

  The poachers operated with the help of a high-powered lamp and an electronic device imitating the call of a stag during the rut, or mating season, in October.

  This attracted stags to come out of their cover in heavily forested areas and become easy targets for the poachers.

  Co Wicklow is reckoned to have the highest concentration of Sika deer in Europe after it was introduced from its native Japan by Lord Powerscourt in 1859, at his estate near Glencree.

  Sika and red deer are closely related, and as a result of inter-breeding, all of the deer now in Wicklow are hybrids.

  It is estimated that about 12,000 of the 32,000 deer shot under licence last year were killed in Wicklow, while hundreds more fell victim to poachers.

  It is understood that venison from poached Irish deer is being exported.

  Intelligence available in the Operation Bambi team indicates that some of those involved are supplying poached deer directly to British dealers who collect carcasses at pre-arranged locations using refrigerated lorries.

  It is believed some of those involved are supplying poached deer directly to British dealers.




Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

  Inspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

“It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

“The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers

will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which   the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”



Cork man fined for forging son's name

Irish Examiner, 25/04/2013

A Cork man has been fined €800 after pleading guilty to charges in connection with the shooting of greyhounds last year.

  In what was the first case of its type in the country, John Corkery pleaded guilty to forging his son's name as the registered owner of a greyhound.

  The 53-year old from Love Lane, Charleville, also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of a transfer of ownership in relation to a greyhound.

  The dogs were two of four found shot in the head in a disused quarry in Co Limerick in April last year.

  Mr Corkery told Gardaí he handed over the two dogs to a third party to dispose of after they showed no promise in chasing hares.



Men released after being questioned over horse shot dead in Kildare
The men were stopped by gardaí on the N4 shortly after the shooting.

The Journal.ie, 17/12/2013

FIVE MEN HAVE been released without charge after a horse was shot dead in Kildare yesterday afternoon.

  The men were stopped in their van by gardaí on the N4 close to the Celbridge interchange and were arrested for questioning.  A  gun was also recovered.

  The horse was shot dead in a field outside Kilcock, on the Clane road.

  Mary Lawlor from the Kildare and West Wicklow Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, told TheJournal.ie that: It’s horrific what’s happening out there at the moment. I think the cruelty element to horses is definitely getting worse.

  The Irish Independent reports that the shooting is part of an ongoing feud between two gangs in the district and that this is the second horse to be shot over the feud.

  A file is being prepared for the DPP.



Animal charity to report to gardaí after puppy found shot in Athlone
The puppy was found at a popular dog-walking spot with four shotgun shells on its body.

The Journal.ie, 02/12/2013

AN ANIMAL WELFARE group says that it will make a report to gardaí after a puppy was found shot dead in Athlone.

  Billy Gallagher of Athlone SPCA says that he received a call yesterday about the discovery of the husky puppy at the entrance of Glynwood Bog, a popular dog walking spot for families.

  The dog was found with four shotgun cartridges on his body.

  Gallagher says that the society has made contact with the dog’s owner, but that they had abandoned the dog, not shot it.

  “We’re going to pass all of that information off to gardaí.

  “It’s a very popular area for people to bring their dogs for walks. Someone was walking their dog and spotted this and called us.”

Although the picture posted on the society’s Facebook page shows only one side of the dog, Gallagher says the other side would be “too distressing”.

  “I only showed the one side because when I lifted up the dog, half its head was gone. I couldn’t put that up because it would be too distressing to people.

  “I didn’t want to turn the dog over and show what happened.”

Gallagher says that cases like this are the extreme, but they deal with “one or two” cases of dumping, in some instances on motorways, a week.

  Anyone in need of assistance with animals in the area can contact ASPCA on 087 9925052.