Roscommon

Man gets jail on angle dust charges.
Irish Times, 22/10/1996.
A Beef farmer with 200 acres in Co. Tipperary has been sentenced to six months imprisonment for possessing angle dust and other illegal hormones on dates between September, 1993, and February, 1995. see more


Warning: Graphic content - Athlone SPCA appeals for witnesses after dog's head blown off

Independent.ie (http://www.independent.ie/incoming/warning-graphic-content-athlone-spca-appeals-for-witnesses-after-dogs-head-blown-off-29801946.html), 02/12/2013

Athlone SPCA has appealed for information following the discovery of a dog which was shot in the head in the town.  see more



Athlone SPCA says dogs dumped weekly on motorway

Shannonside FM, 02/12/2013

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Athlone says that animals are being dumped on a daily basis in the area. The group has made an appeal for witnesses after a husky dog was shot 4 times over the weekend. The dead animal was discovered by a passer-by on the road in the popular Glynwood Bog area on Sunday afternoon.

  Chairperson of the SPCA Billy Gallagher says the incident has been handed over to the Gardai but they fear that the animal was dumped after failed attempts to sell the dog. Mr. Gallagher says that while this case is extreme people are dumping animals along the motorway on a weekly basis: Billy Gallagher is appealing for people to contact the Gardai if they have further information.  He’s reminding people that it is an offence to abandon and of course shoot an animal except in some circumstances where farmers are permitted to do so.



Man gets jail on angel dust charges

Irish Times, 22/10/1996

A beef farmer with 200 acres in Co. Tipperary has been sentenced to six months imprisonment for possessing angel dust and other illegal hormones on dates between September, 1993, and February, 1995.

Ronald Armitage, Uskane, Borrisokane, had pleaded guilty to 12 charges of possessing the banned drugs at his Tipperary farm and on a rented farm at Croghan, Co. Roscommon. He was one of the five farmers dealt with at a special sitting of Athlone District Court yesterday, when fines totalling £29,000 were imposed on summonses relating to illegal animal drug abuse. Armitage was fined £12,000 by Judge Mary Fahy. Mr. Declan Holms, a Department of Agriculture inspector, said he carried out the Croghan search, where Armitage had rented land on September 30, 1993. The two summonses arising from this search related to the possession of Clenbuterol, commonly known as Angel Dust. He also took part in a raid at Borrisokane on October 11, 1993, where a substantial quantity of illegal substances in the form of a hormone “cocktail” was among items found in a cemetery adjacent to his farm. There was a cattle crush built in the ruins of a church and, he said, the substances had been thrown out the window of the church into an adjoining cemetery. A raiding team found bottles on the defendant’s farm, on September 30, 1993 which contained a hormone cocktail and also an implant cartridge containing illegal hormones was found. The farm was searched again on the 13th of February 1995 when Clebuterol and illegal hormones were found.



Roscommon AI man fined

Irish Farmers Journal, 04/12/2004

A Roscommon man has been fined €250 and ordered to pay €3,200 in costs and expenses after admitting to Roscommon District court for operating an unlicensed AI business with 300 farmer clients.

Richard Kenny of Mount Talbot, Roscommon also received three separate fines of €250 each for possession of two fertility drugs and carrying out unauthorised trading in bovine semen.

The case arose following a raid on the defendant’s farm by the Department of Agriculture in October, 2002.



ISPCA probes suspicious beheading of dog on railway track

Irish Independent, 08/01/2005

Gardai in Athlone and the ISPCA are investigating an incident in which a dog may have been tied to railway tracks by a group of youths and had its head severed by an oncoming train.

  Local ISPCA inspector Paul McCormack said they were investigating two sinister incidents which may be connected.

  The first was before Christmas when a local butcher overheard two 13-year-old boys discussing taking a stray dog from the town and tying tit to railway tracks to see what would happen.

  The butcher talked the boys out of their plan. A local woman contacted the ISPCA and the stray was picked up.

  On January 1, a rare Pyrenean Mountain Dog owned by a local went missing and was found beheaded on railway tracks. “We don’t know if the events are connected but it seems too much of a coincidence,” said Mr McCormack.

  The dog’s instinct would have been to run so it was unlikely it would have come near the train unless held there, he said. The area where the dog was found was fenced off, so it would have had to walk over a mile along tracks.

  Mick McDonnell, the dog’s owner, said he was devastated. He had thought that his dog strayed and was killed accidentally by a train, but now he believes otherwise. His two-year-old dog, Snorri, was a fixture on a Viking Tour boat he runs, taking tourists on trips of Lough Ree each year.

  A spokesman for the gardai in Athlone said they were investigating the incident. Mr Cormack appealed for anyone with information to come forward.



Farm couple face animal drugs charges

Irish Independent, 07/02/2002

A bottle containing an illegal cattle growth promoter was found in a famer’s wardrobe, a court heard yesterday.

  Department of Agriculture veterinary inspectors also discovered two bottles of illegal antibiotics stored in the farmer’s kitchen fridge at Ballindollaghan, Lissalway, Castlerea, Co Roscommon.

  James Brady (36) and his wife Mary are before Ballyhaunis District Court on summonses alleging they had possessions of animal remedies without a licence on July 25, 2000, contrary to the 1993 Animal Remedies Act. Both defendants deny the charges.

The bottles taken from the fridge were found to contain an antibiotic, oxytetracycline. The bottle taken from the wardrobe contained oestradiol benzoate and nortestosterone deconate, the court heard. The case continues today


ISPCA dog pounds ‘barbaric and cruel’

Sunday Tribune, 13/10/1996

The ISPCA has been accused of cruelty to animals at some of its dog pounds throughout the country.  The allegations have been made by an animal welfare group.  The Irish Trust For The Protection And Care for Animals (ITPCA), which has condemned the ISPCA’s policy of putting down dogs using a bolt gun.

  The ISPCA says that conditions and practices at dog pounds in Sligo, Kerry Ennis and Roscommon amount to cruelty to the animals there.  Following visits to the pounds two weeks ago, which they filmed, the Trust called on the ISPCA to “monitor animal shelters in rural areas or withdraw from the dog warden service.”

  The ISPCA told The Sunday Tribune that it was aware that conditions at some pounds “were not up to scratch.  We are currently trying to persuade local authorities to upgrade standards.”

  The Trust claims that chloroform and bolt guns are used regularly in the Kerry pound.  “These have no place in animal welfare,” said Robert Doyle, a director.  “It is a barbaric, outdated and cruel practice.”  He criticised the lack of veterinary input into the killing of animals.  The shootings were usually carried out by dog wardens “who should not be the arbitrator between the life and death of an animal,” he said.  The ISPCA acknowledged that bolt guns were used but denied it was a cruel way to kill animals.

  Doyle’s film of the Ennis pound showed dogs of all ages in an enclosed room with no outdoor area and, apparently, no natural light.  One of the dogs was continually scratching and seemed to have an eye lesion.  There were also faeces littering the room and many of the dogs appeared bloated suggesting, said Doyle, that they had worms.

  In Kerry,  Doyle said the pound was situated “next to a slaughter house where pigs are killed on a daily basis.  We would consider this to be inappropriate and causes stress to the dogs,” he added.

  Mr Doyle said he had called the gardai to the Roscommon pound when he noticed a dog tied in a kennel “and in danger of strangulation.”  The dog was standing in water but “the rope around its neck was too short and did not allow the animal to lie down without getting wet.  The inside of the building was almost dark and a greyhound appeared to me to be in need of veterinary treatment.”

  The Trust has called for the closure of the dog pounds in Roscommon and Sligo, where it claims conditions for animals are also poor.  It also wants an end to the use of bolt guns which it described as a “form of cutprice dog control.  That euthanasia is necessary at all is distressing.  To have animals shot in the head – a shot that has no guarantee of success – by an organisation that is supposed to prevent cruelty is beyond belief.”

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Ciaran O’Donovan rejected these claims, arguing that “new keneels are to be built in Sligo which will create a lot of extra space for the animals.  I am aware of the problems in Roscommon but the local authority there has included money in its estimates for a new pound so that problem should be sorted soon as well.”

  Conditions at most pounds were excellent, he said.  “It would be nice to hear the Trust praise those as well as criticising the minority of pounds where conditions are poor.”



Tiny puppy is forced to run solo

Dog saved after siblings cruelly die

The Star, 26/11/2004

Abused puppy Solo must grow up without his little brothers and sisters after they all died when cruelly abandoned in a bog.

  The adorable four-week-old is the only survivor of 10 puppies thrown inside two tied plastic bags and left to die in a peat bog in Crossmalina, Co Mayo.

  The spaniels were found by a passerby two weeks ago, who then contacted Briarfields Animal Sanctuary in Lisacul, Co Roscommon.

  The sanctuary is the home of Edward and Patricia Preston, who have been looking after stray and injured dogs for nine years.

  “It’s the kind of things we deal with every week,” Edward told the Star.

The Prestons have between 40 and 50 dogs at any one time, and they post pictures of them on the Internet in the hole that someone will give them a home.

  Last year, a three-legged dog named Lucky was given a new home in Sweden and even appeared on television.

  “Lucky was found in a ditch by a lady walking her own dog,” said Mr Preston.

  “The lady knew she had just been hit by a car. We went along to see what happened, and when we got there we found she had a crushed leg, which had to be amputated.


Vet

“We took care of her for two years until she was seen by a vet in Sweden. Subsequently, she appeared on a Swedish Rescue Television,” he said.

Mr Preston said they constantly find it difficult to fund their sanctuary, and donations are very much needed.

Donation cheques or postal orders can be sent to Briarfields Animal Sanctuary, in Lisacul, Co Roscommon.



Man fined for horse cruelty

Irish Daily Star, 17/10/2007

A farmer who neglected an old horse on his land was convicted yesterday. Donal Seeley (34) of Ballymurray Co. Roscommon pleaded guilty at Roscommon District Court to animal cruelty.

    The court heard ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes found the animal in excruciating pain on land at Ballyleague, Lanesborough, in November 2006 and it was so sick it had to be put down.

 Solicitor Kevin Kilrain said Seeley was simply busy and did not visit the land in question that often. He said the horse was old and worn and was worth nothing.  

  Judge Jeffrey Brown said that was no excuse. The judge imposed a find of €1,000 and ordered Seely to pay costs of €690. After the case ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes said it was one of the worst cases he'd ever seen.



Dogs left for days without food and water in ISPCA run shelter

The charity say they have suspended two staff members in the Roscommon shelter.

Jounal.ie, 10/08/2014

THE ISPCA HAS suspended two staff members after 10 dogs at a Roscommon dog shelter were left without food and water for a number of days.

  The dogs were left abandoned for at least the August bank holiday weekend and were found after members of the public contacted gardaí expressing concern for the animals’ welfare.

  The shelter is run by the ISPCA and is part funded by Roscommon County Council with the animal welfare charity saying that they are treating the incident “extremely seriously”.

  Gardaí and a council employee entered the shelter last Monday after they were alerted by a member of the public that it was left unattended.

  The concerned person is understood to have initially noticed that the shelter was closed the week previously.

  The ten dogs which are believed to include huskies, labradors and collies were then removed from the shelter and nine were taken to a veterinary clinic in Cloverhill.

  All of the dogs are now understood to be healthy and are ready to be re-homed. Five are currently in the ISPCA dog shelter in Longford.

  One of the dogs was deemed to be aggressive and was assessed by an animal behaviour specialist but is now suitable for re-homing.

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly told TheJournal.ie that the dogs were not in a bad condition when they were were found but that it is “completely unacceptable” that they were left alone:

  The dogs were actually in good condition but they were slightly dehydrated and they were hungry. There is absolutely no truth the story that’s being reported that one of them was found with a wire around its neck.

  “They were however left without food and water which is completely unacceptable,” he said.

  Kelly added that they are “investigating the sequence of events” that led to the dogs being left left unattended and expected to complete the investigation in the coming days.

  All local authorities are required to provide services for the care of dogs and Roscommon County Council pays the ISPCA a yearly fee to run the shelter and to employ a dog warden



ISPCA worker is fired after leaving dogs without food

The ISPCA has confirmed that a member of staff has been dismissed after 10 dogs were left without food or water over a bank holiday weekend.

Irish Independent, 06/11/2014

The staff member was dismissed for gross misconduct, chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly said.

  The action followed an investigation by the society into the incident at Roscommon Dog Pound over two days of the August Bank Holiday period. The ISPCA has held the contract for managing the pound for Roscommon County Council for the last 27 years.

  A preliminary investigation was carried out after a member of the public alerted gardai to the situation at the pound in Rockfield, Donamon, on Monday August 4. Gardai and vets removed the 10 dogs from the shelter.

  The pound's members of staff were initially suspended by the ISPCA pending a full investigation into allegations that the animals had been left without food or water for 48 hours.

  Yesterday Dr Kelly confirmed that the incident had been fully investigated and one staff member had been dismissed. He also revealed that, as a result of the incident, the county council had accepted the society's offer to terminate its long-standing contract.

  "We took full responsibility for the incident that occurred over the bank holiday weekend in August and we took decisive action and we carried out a full investigation. As a result of that investigation a member of staff was dismissed for gross misconduct.

  "It was part of a review of services generally, but really the incident in August drove us to offer to terminate the contract and Roscommon gracefully accepted our decision", he said.

Dr Kelly explained that he felt the best thing to do after the incident at the Roscommon facility was for the charity to withdraw from its involvement there.

  He stressed that the decision to terminate the contract was driven by the ISPCA and it would not be bidding for the new one.

  Roscommon County Council is now re-advertising the contract for the operation of the county dog pound. Tenders are currently being invited for the operation of the service and a site visit to view the facilities at Rockfield will be held on November 11.

  Tenders have to be returned to the council by November 20.



Puppies in Roscommon mutilated for “cosmetic reasons”

Shannon Side, 08/04/2014

The ISPCA is to take action against a dog owner in Roscommon after an Inspector called to a property in the county last week and found puppies whose tails had been docked.

  The litter of puppies was discovered after a call made to the charity’s National Animal Cruelty Helpline.

The docking of puppies tails, and the removal of dew claws by lay-person is outlawed under the new Animal Health and Welfare Act and carries significant fines.

  The ISPCA says the mutilation of young pups for no good reason will no longer be tolerated, and we need to get away from the attitude that some breeds don’t look right with long tails.

  Speaking on the Let’s Talk programme this afternoon, Dr Andrew Kelly, who is the new Chief Executive of the ISPCA says they are determined to enforce the new welfare act for animals, and will be taking action where they see it is necessary.



Seven puppies found dumped in bog

Athlone Advertiser. 01/08/2014

The ASPCA have reported that seven puppies have been found dumped in a bog in the same location a number of puppies were found a year ago.

  The Athlone Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals were called to a bog road at Derrycahill, Ballyforan, Co Roscommon at around 9.30pm on Wednesday evening, after two cyclists reported hearing whimpering at a place where people frequently dump household rubbish.

  Knowing that abandoned pups would not survive the night, members of the ASPCA were on the scene as quickly as possible.

  “We got our wellingtons and flashlights out and drove as quick as we could as it was getting dark on a wet evening. After carefully searching through overgrown briars and broken glass we started finding pups one by one. We had got five into the safety of a warm blanket and were ready to go, when we heard more crying in the distance and finally found two more huddled up together in the dark with our flashlights,” explained Billy Gallagher of ASPCA.

  The ASPCA is asking that if any member of the public from this area knows of anyone who had one or two recently pregnant collie-type dogs to call them at (087 ) 9925052 or send a private message via their Facebook page - Athlone SPCA.

  “All information will be handled completely confidentially. This is the second year that pups were dumped in this exact same location,” said Billy.

“Abandoning animals is not only cruel but it is a criminal offence. When these pups are old enough we will try and get good homes for them. Please contact us if you can give one of these pups a forever home.”



Collie cuties DUMPED – along the same road where pups of the same breed were rescued by the Athlone SPCA last year

Evoke.ie, 31/07/2014

An animal welfare group was yesterday on the trail of an owner who abandoned seven pups along a bog road in the West.

  The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said it was the second year in a row that pups of the same breed were found in exactly the same spot.

  ‘We’ve got a very good lead about a dog owner not too far from where we found the pups and we’ll be visiting that person over the next day or so,’ said Billy Gallagher of the Athlone SPCA.

  A couple on a late-evening cycle along the bog road at Derrycahill, Ballyforan, Co. Roscommon alerted Billy after hearing whimpering from a location often used to illegally dump refuse.

  After searching the scene, Mr Gallagher discovered the pups. ‘They’d just been left there by the owner… Last year in exactly the same spot we found two pups of the same cross-breed – a Collie-cross – and one was already dead. I’d be pretty sure it’s the same person involved,’ he said.

  Now the Athlone SPCA plans to visit the person identified to them and ask about the abandoned pups.



Dogs left for days without food and water in ISPCA run shelter

The charity say they have suspended two staff members in the Roscommon shelter.

Journal.ie, 10/08/2014

THE ISPCA HAS suspended two staff members after 10 dogs at a Roscommon dog shelter were left without food and water for a number of days.

  The dogs were left abandoned for at least the August bank holiday weekend and were found after members of the public contacted gardaí expressing concern for the animals’ welfare.

  The shelter is run by the ISPCA and is part funded by Roscommon County Council with the animal welfare charity saying that they are treating the incident “extremely seriously”.

  Gardaí and a council employee entered the shelter last Monday after they were alerted by a member of the public that it was left unattended.

  The concerned person is understood to have initially noticed that the shelter was closed the week previously.

  The ten dogs which are believed to include huskies, labradors and collies were then removed from the shelter and nine were taken to a veterinary clinic in Cloverhill.

  All of the dogs are now understood to be healthy and are ready to be re-homed. Five are currently in the ISPCA dog shelter in Longford.

  One of the dogs was deemed to be aggressive and was assessed by an animal behaviour specialist but is now suitable for re-homing.

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly told TheJournal.ie that the dogs were not in a bad condition when they were were found but that it is “completely unacceptable” that they were left alone:

  The dogs were actually in good condition but they were slightly dehydrated and they were hungry. There is absolutely no truth the story that’s being reported that one of them was found with a wire around its neck.

  “They were however left without food and water which is completely unacceptable,” he said.

Kelly added that they are “investigating the sequence of events” that led to the dogs being left left unattended and expected to complete the investigation in the coming days.

  All local authorities are required to provide services for the care of dogs and Roscommon County Council pays the ISPCA a yearly fee to run the shelter and to employ a dog warden.



The puppy was found at a popular dog-walking spot with four shotgun shells on its body.

The Journal.ie, 02/12/2013

AN ANIMAL WELFARE group says that it will make a report to gardaí after a puppy was found shot dead in Athlone.

  Billy Gallagher of Athlone SPCA says that he received a call yesterday about the discovery of the husky puppy at the entrance of Glynwood Bog, a popular dog walking spot for families.

  The dog was found with four shotgun cartridges on his body.

  Gallagher says that the society has made contact with the dog’s owner, but that they had abandoned the dog, not shot it.

  “We’re going to pass all of that information off to gardaí.

  “It’s a very popular area for people to bring their dogs for walks. Someone was walking their dog and spotted this and called us.”

Although the picture posted on the society’s Facebook page shows only one side of the dog, Gallagher says the other side would be “too distressing”.

  “I only showed the one side because when I lifted up the dog, half its head was gone. I couldn’t put that up because it would be too distressing to people.

  “I didn’t want to turn the dog over and show what happened.”

Gallagher says that cases like this are the extreme, but they deal with “one or two” cases of dumping, in some instances on motorways, a week.

  Anyone in need of assistance with animals in the area can contact ASPCA on 087 9925052.