Monaghan

Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot.

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the dog beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car. Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70), pleaded with Oliver Byrne (57) from Aghaloughan, near Carrickmacross, not to shoot the dog, which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car, where it was hiding, and discharged his shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs. Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog. Judge Brennan fined him £100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms’ certificate.


Farmer sent to jail over foot-and-mouth breach

Irish Independent, 20/06/2003

William Cranston of Skerrymore, Drumacrib Co.Monaghan was sentenced to three months imprisonment and fined a total of €7,200 with €2,250 at Castleblayney District Court (19/05/03) after he pleaded guilty to six breaches of regulations during the 2000/2001 foot-and-mouth outbreak. He faced 16 charges brought by the Minister for Agriculture for contravening regulations introduced by the department relating to the movement of livestock between October 24, 2000 and May 5, 2001. Mr.Cranston also faced a number of charges related to breaches of the Bovine TB Order and the Diseases of Animals act on various dates.  Following a guilty plea by Mr.Cranston the judge, Flann Brennan, struck out 10 of the charges, all of which arose as a result of the discovery by department officials of livestock from the North on the accused’s farm in the Republic.


Cattle ring is smashed.

Sunday World, 05/10/2003

A huge cattle smuggling racket along the border has been smashed. The DOA has discovered that false ear tags are being used for animals being smuggled and offered for sale and that the racketterrs are also using identity cards which don’t belong to animals being sold into the Irish meat chain. A number of farmers and cattle dealers in the border counties of Monaghan, Cavan, Louth and Donegal are being quizzed in connection with the racket.



Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the injured animal dead beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car.

Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court (28/01/03) that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70) pleaded with Oliver Byrne (37) from Aghaloughan near Carrickmacross not to shoot the dog which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car where it was hiding and discharged the shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs.

Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog.

Judge Brenann fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate.



Irish Examiner, 29/01/2003

A farmer who chased a dog he had already wounded with a gunshot into a neighbour’s yard and then shot it dead in front of an elderly woman, a court heard yesterday. Judge Flann Brennan was told pensioner Katheleen Marron, aged 70, who was sitting in a car under which the dog was hiding, pleaded with Oliver Byrne, aged 57, from Aghloughan near Carrickmacross Co. Monaghan, not to shoot it.

However, he dragged the animal out and shot it in the head. Byrne pleaded guilty through defence lawyer Brendan Lareny at Carrickmacross Disttict Court to a charge of recklessly discharging a firearm at the farmyard killing the dog. The accused solicitor said his client’s livestock were being harassed by dogs and this led him to taking such “drastic action” with his legally held shotgun on the occasion. He since regretted taking such a course of action.

Judge Brennan fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate in the future.



Farmers fined for livestock and record-keeping offences

Irish Independent, 14/06/2005

Fines totalling €10,500 were imposed on two Co Monaghan farmers who pleaded guilty to breaching EY regulations relating to the movement of livestock and failing to keep herd records.

  At Carrickmacross District Court, Judge Flann Brennan also ordered the men to pay expenses totalling €2,950.

  Aidan McCooey, Derrycreevy, Castleblayney, was fined a total of €6,000 when he was convicted on eight charges brought by the Department of Agriculture and Food.

  He also received a suspended sentence of four months imprisonment, and was ordered to enter into a €1,000 bond to be of good behaviour for four years.

  The other accused, Patsy McCooey, Drumalish, Castleblaney, was fined a total of €4,500.

  Each of the accused were also ordered to pay €1,475 expenses.

  Brendan Daly, an official at the Department of Agriculture, gave evidence of investigating the breaches.

  The court heard the charges were adjourned on a number of occasions. They related to breaches of EU regulations governing the movement of livestock over a period between May 2002 and August 2003 and failure to keep records, required under the EU and the Department’s Bovine regulations.

  Similar charges against a third farmer, William Crabston, Skerrymore, Drumacrib, Co Monaghan were adjourned to a further hearing.



Farmer raided for angel dust fined £5,000

Irish Independent, 30/05/1997

A farmer convicted of possessing the illegal growth promoter Clembuterol – commonly known as angel dust – was fined a total of £5,000 yesterday.

  Eamon Heagney (32) of Tully House, Eyrecourt, Co Galway, was also convicted by Judge Mary Fahy of possessing a hormone implant gun, sheep sponges and other prohibited substances at Eyrecourt on October 23 1991.

  Athlone court heard Heagney was joint owner of a farm of 2,000 sheep and 100 cattle and ran a fattening operation with his brother Con.

  A team of Department of Agriculture veterinary officers who searched the farm on foot af [sic] a warrant discovered a box of Clembuterol hidden in a shed wall recess.

  The hormone implant gun and other items were found in other sheds.

  Defending barrister Brendan Grehan said a large sheep fattening operation was going on at the farm. Heagney had developed a lucrative contract with a Spanish importer for supply of meat involving a huge capital investment but the entire contract was wiped out as a result of “what happened.”

  Paying tribute to the media’s role in highlighting “cases of this nature,” the judge fined Heagney £1,000 on each of five summonses.

  A number of similar summonses against Con Heagney of the same address were adjourned to July 28 for a hearing date.



Cattle fraud is broken up

News of the World, 26/03/2006

A cattle-smuggling scam that put the public at risk has been stamped out.

  Last week in a special court in Carrickmacross, Co Monaghan, a farmer who admitted moving livestock without having the animals stock without having the animals properly tested was fined €4,500 and ordered to pay €5,300 costs.

  The prosecution of William Cranston of Skerrymore, Drumacrib, Co Monaghan, was the last in a series of cases that arose from a countrywide crack down on rogue cattle dealers.

  A Department of Agriculture vet, Brian Flaherty said yesterday that racketeering in the livestock industry puts everyone at risk.

One of the most serious aspects is that brucellosis can be transferred from livestock to humans, he added.



Farmers hang dead dog on gate

Evening Herald, 20/04/2006

This is the brutal sight which greeted motorists as they passed through a busy farming community plagued by dog attacks.

  Furious with the ongoing problem of sheep killings, farmers in Monaghan tied a dead Labrador dog to a gate alongside slain sheep.

  The horrific display was organised by frustrated farmers, furious at the latest killings of their flocks.

  However, it was met with shock from animal welfare groups, who described the protest as “gruesome”.

  Tina Boyle, an inspector with the ISPCA in Cavan, said she did not believe putting dead animals on public display was the correct way to tackle the problem.

  The Irish Farmers Association also expressed shock at the manner in which the dead dog had been put on public display.

  A spokesman admitted: “I think there would be unease about that.”

  Henry Byrnes, the IFA’s national sheep committee chairman, said: “Every flock owner has the right to defend his sheep but we would not condone putting dead animals on display.”

The dog was shot by a farmer who intercepted a pack of hounds as they targeted his sheep.