Louth

Evening Herald, 28/03/2003

Beef farmer, Joe Earley, Castle Manor, Drogheda Co.Louth was sentenced to two year’s imprisonment on six charges relating to use of illegal growth hormones and misuse of cattle identity tags. Det Garda Gerry Nohilly of Mullingar said Earley would use the hormones on other people’s cattle and offered a service where he would provide the cattle and the illegal hormones if they wished. Earley also put false identity tags on cattle so he could claim cash from the Department of Agriculture on them.


Cattle ring is smashed.

Sunday World, 5/10/2003

A huge cattle smuggling racket along the border has been smashed. The DOA has discovered that false ear tags are being used for animals being smuggled and offered for sale and that the racketterrs are also using identity cards which don’t belong to animals being sold into the Irish meat chain. A number of farmers and cattle dealers in the border counties of Monaghan, Cavan, Louth and Donegal are being quizzed in connection with the racket.


Cattle trader jailed over illegal tags and growth hormones.

Irish Independent, 28/3/2003

A cattle dealer who put false tags on cattle in order to claim subsidies was jailed for two years yesterday. Dundalk Circuit Criminal Court heard of how Joe Early, Drogheda but originally from Meath had specially adapted vice grips to remove cattle tags and place them on other animals. He was making a profit of around 127e an animal and had been doing this for 2 to 3 years. He used a stolen stamp to certify animals were clear of TB or Brucellosis. He traded between 1500 and 2000 animals but not all would have been tampered with.



Fears of cock-fighting ring after birds found dumped

Irish Examiner, 02/08/2011

ANIMAL welfare groups are concerned there may be a cock-fighting ring operating in the Dundalk area after a number of injured cocks and other fighting birds were found dumped.  see more



Nag Hack Horror
Irish Sun, 28/10/2013

A pony was left with a deep wound after 'a sadistic monster... used back street surgery' in a bid to remove a micro-chip says a leading horse charity. The female grey nag was rescued from the Cooley Mountains in Co. Louth after a member of the public saw she was injured. Elaine Duffy of Holly's Horse Haven charity in Omeath stormed: "It was an inhumane horror where monsters simply mutilated a poor defenceless creature."  A microchip was found on scanning in a different spot on the pony's neck. However, as it is unregistered no owner can be traced.


Cattle trader jailed over illegal tags and growth hormones

Irish Independent, 28/03/2003

A cattle dealer who put false identity tags on cattle in order to claim subsidies was jailed for two years yesterday.  see more



Dogs in cruelty case costing £45,000 to kennel

Irish Independent, 18/11/2000

The kennelling of 26 dogs belonging to a woman convicted of cruelty to the animals, has so far cost more than £45,000, the High Court was told yesterday.

  Donna Sfar, St Bronagh’s Lisdoo, Dundalk, Co Louth successfully challenged part of a Circuit Court order which disqualified her from “owning” a dog for 10 years, whereas the legislation empowers a judge to prohibit a person “keeping” a dog. Ms Sfar was convicted in May, 1999 in Dundalk District Court of cruelty to her 26 dogs. She was fined £300 and disqualified from “owning” a dog for five years. She appealed to the Circuit Court which affirmed the order but increased the disqualification to 10 years. Yesterday, Ms Sfar’s counsel, Feichin McDonagh SC, said that to date the kennelling of the dogs had cost £44,900, of which his clients had paid £19,400, leaving over £25,000 outstanding.

  Quashing the part of the Circuit Court order which disqualified Ms Sfar from “owning” a dog for 10 years, Mr Justice Kearns said that he thought the proceedings could have been brought to court a long time before yesterday. The judge said it appeared that the original mistake disqualifying Ms Sfar from “owning” dogs had been made in the District Court order.



Cruel beyond belief

Top racing dogs left to die

Irish Daily Mirror, 07/02/2008

Sick thugs left this defenceless greyhound to die in agony from open wounds, it has been revealed.

  The terrified animal, who was starving and had bones protruding, had to be put down because she was in such an appalling state.

  A horrified litter warden found the award-winning bitch and another 12 dogs cowering in a shed in their own excrement near Dundalk, Co Louth.

  Louth SPCA inspector Fiona Squibb said: “she was totally malnourished.

  “She was emaciated and her ribs were protruding. She had open gaping sores the size of tennis balls from where she had been lying on the hard floor.

  “Two of them were so bad that you c6ould see the bones through the wounds.

  “The vet said she had terrible muscle wastage from not getting enough to eat.

  “We were able to identify the dogs from the tattoos on their ears and discovered that the bitch was actually an A1 racing dog which had won a number of races at Dundalk stadium.

  “It was very sad to see her end like this.

  “Some of the other dogs also had pressure sores although they were not in as bad a condition as the bitch.

  “The dogs were being kept in a shed in an isolated area and when we went in I thought there was a dead animal as the smell was so bad.

  “The c6onditions that the dogs were being kept were absolutely appalling.

  “There was excrement and urine everywhere and the whole place was soaking wet. It was disgusting. There was a river of effluent running down the middle of what would have been once an old milking shed.

  “The shed was divided into temporary compartments and the dogs had no bedding and were lying on bare concrete floors.” A Bord na gCon steward, Louth County veterinary Officer Garrett Shine and Louth local authority dog wardens and the gardai went to the scene after being alerted about the appalling conditions.

  Animal welfare authorities are set to take legal action against the dog owner.

  Fiona said the Bord na gCon steward was appalled at the condition the dogs were in and told her it was the worst he had ever seen.

She added: “Bord na gCon have now taken the dogs and are looking after them and they will be rehomed.”



Irish Times, 10/01/2010

A greyhound control steward in Dundalk stadium has resigned following allegations that he allowed a “ringer” to win a race last June. Declan Haughey left his position at the end of last year after an internal investigation found irregularities in a race in which Mays Hurryonboy, a novice, won in a near course-record time of 28.4 seconds, 13 lengths clear of second place. As the two-year-old dog’s time was more than two seconds faster than in a trial three weeks earlier, it raised instant suspicions among spectators and bookmakers. Greyhound sources said a two-second improvement in three weeks was almost unprecedented. The case is the latest in a series of alleged cheating incidents and disputes to beset the Irish Greyhound Board (IGB), which will get almost €12m in state funding this year.



Financial problems leads to animal cruelty

Advertiser.ie, 25/02/2011

Five animals, including a calf, died and were scavenged on a Mullingar farm when their 25-year-old owner’s financial pressures became too much for him.

  Marc Finnegan of Readypenny, Dundalk, County Louth, was given a six month suspended sentence for leaving a carcass unburied on rented land at Joristown, Mullingar last year.

  Animal cruelty charges were taken into consideration at Mullingar District Court, with Judge Eamon O’Brien describing photographs of the scene as horrific and appalling.

  The court heard Finnegan, who had been farming for six years with his father, had borrowed heavily at the height of the boom to develop his herd and an agricultural contracting business.

  When clients didn’t pay him, he spiralled into “dire financial circumstances”, solicitor Chynel Phelan explained, and this led him to stop making rational decisions.

  Garda Enda Brown described a large number of underfed, malnourished animals when he visited the 180 acre farm on January 18 last.

  A heifer and cow had to be put down by Department of Agriculture veterinary inspector Jonathan Cooney, including a limousin cow which had been left in a ditch for a number of days with no food or water.

  Carcasses, some of which were extensively scavenged, had been left for days with one partially under plastic and one submerged in a small stream.

  A limousine calf left unburied for more than a week had been scavenged to the point where there was nothing left to remove, the inspector said.

  He became aware of the farm when its owners complained that Finnegan had overstayed his lease there.

  At the time Finnegan had up to 106 animals there, which in good condition would have been worth up to €90,000, the inspector said.

  He had reduced his total herd from 300 to less than 50 and the inspector said it was the department’s objective that Finnegan end his involvement in farming.

  Ms Phelan said her client’s local vet described him as an honest and genuine farmer who overstretched himself by putting so much effort into building up his herd.

  Finnegan suffers with anxiety, she said and knowledge of what he had done did not sit easily with him.

  It happened at a time when weather was particularly bad and roads between the farm and his home almost 80 miles away were often impassable. 

  He is utterly embarrassed and ashamed and very remorseful, she said and pointed out that Finnegan faces further summonses relating to the death of some of the animals which were later removed from the farm.

  Judge O’Brien expressed his surprise that Finnegan had no herdsman locally to mind the animals for him and suspended the six month sentence for two years.



Dog used as fighting bait left savaged

Drogheda Independent, 05/01/2011

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn was believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of the worst cases the organisation had seen this year.

  They reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck. The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals. Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher had been named Lucky as he was lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

DAR were also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there were many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.



ANIMAL USED AS BAIT FOR DOG FIGHTING

Drogheda Independent, 02/06/2010

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn is believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal last week, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of hte worst cases the organisation has seen this year.

  They have reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene last Wednesday, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck.

  The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals.

  Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher has been named Lucky as he is lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

  Drogheda Animal Rescue is urgently seeking donations to help pay for Lucky's veterinarian care and his long road to recovery.

  DAR are also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there are have been many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.

  For further information or to make a donation contact Drogheda Animal Rescue on 9832418 or visit their website at www.dar.ie.


Tortured dog Pippa seeking a new home

Drogheda Independent, 20/05/2005

DROGHEDA’s Animal Rescue Centre (ARC) is hoping for a happy ending to a tale of terrible animal cruelty.

  They are looking for a new home for Pippa, a springer spaniel who was subjected to systematic torture, burned by hot oil deliberately poured on her head.

  ‘It’s a horrible case, one of the worst we have seen in some time,’ said Lisa Martinez of the Drogheda Animal Rescue Centre. ‘We got a call from a distressed woman who was so appalled by the condition of the dog, she took it straight away to the Garda Station and wouldn't leave until something was sorted out.’

Pippa was picked up wandering around the town at the end of March with horrific injuries. When the ARC volunteers got to the Garda station they found a sorry sight.

  ‘Pippa was lice ridden, to such an extent that they could be seen crawling around her fur. She was just skin and bone with her ribs sticking out and large sores on her backside from spending extensive time sitting on a concrete floor. Worst of all were the large open wounds on her head,’ said Lisa.

At first the ARC thought Pippa had been used for dog fighting but a vet’s report revealed

the truth.

  ‘She said the wounds were burns, most likely caused by deliberately pouring a hot liquid such as oil on her head.’

Pippa’s condition was immediately reported to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals who are investigating the case.

  Despite her ill treatment Pippa is very friendly and affectionate. At the moment she is being ‘fostered’ by ARC volunteer Paula Loughlin who is nursing the animal back to health at her home in Mornington.

  ‘We are looking for a new home for Pippa, who is almost fully recovered,’ said Lisa. Before she goes to new owners Pippa will be neutered and fully vaccinated.

They found a new home this month for another badly mistreated dog. Jewel is an English Pointer who was found, half starved with much of her fur missing and bloody sores covering her body, in Julianstown last December.

  A family in Scotland who keep pointers heard about Jewel’s sorry tale. When they saw the dramatic before and after photos of her, they were determined to give her a home, said Lisa. Jewel went to Scotland two weeks ago.

  If you are interested in providing Pippa with the good home she deserves and needs, please contact Drogheda Animal Rescue Centre at 041-9832418.