Limerick

Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer's last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002.
A Judge issued his final warning to an elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O'Sullivan, 78, from Doonass, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O'Donnell told O'Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her farm wasn't depopulated within a fortnight. O'Sullivan's solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not willing to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. Judge O'Donnell released O'Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.



Dog lured to its death by University of Limerick students in drunken game

Limerick Leader, 2/6/2013

 DRUNK UL students lured a dog to its death in a sick game, says a local resident.  see more


Greyhounds shot and dumped in Limerick quarry after poor trials

Limerick Leader, 02/05/2013

THE OWNER of greyhounds that were shot and dumped in a quarry in County Limerick refused to tell gardai who killed the animals, a court has heard.  see more



Woman died from allergic reaction to sex with dog 
The Journal.ie, 08/07/2011 
A man appears in court after allegedly ordering his Alsatian dog to have sex with a woman who died as a result. A MAN HAS appeared before Limerick District Court charged with ordering his Alsatian dog to have sex with a 43-year-old mother of four, who died from an adverse allergic reaction to the intercourse. The Irish Sun reports that Sean McDonnell, 57, is charged with buggery contrary to Section 61 of the Offences against the Person Act of 1861 – and is believed to be the first person in Ireland to be charged under the legislation. The Irish Daily Star adds that McDonnell and the deceased woman had discussed the arrangement on a bestiality internet chat room, and that Gardaí are satisfied that the intercourse was consensual. The Alsatian dog has been kept in quarantine ever since the incident of 7 October, 2008, Patrick O’Connell wrote.

  The woman fell ill at around 7:30pm that evening and was rushed to Mid-Western Regional Hospital where she died at around 8pm. Tests showed she had died of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction similar to that prompted by peanut allergies. The Sun’s Barry Moran said McDonnell could face a life sentence in prison if found guilty.



Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds
The Irish Times, 12/04/2012
The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention
of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”. Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.



Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer’s last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002

A judge issued his final warning to elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O’Sullivan, 78, from Doonaas,, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O’Donnell told O’Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her harm wasn’t depopulated within a fortnight. O’Sullivan’s solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not wiling to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. The court also heard from Mary Bourke, a Department of Agriculture vet, that 23 cattle from the farm had been slaughtered last Thursday and that 17 would be removed next week. The court also heard the department was giving O’Sullivan one last chance to sell the rest of the herd or they would be removed and slaughtered by Christmas under EU regulations. Judge O’Donnell released O’Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.



Heartless and cruel…how can anyone treat dogs like this?

Irish Independent, 21/09/2006

Animal welfare volunteers have described the discovery of two dogs in horrific conditions as an “all-time low” in 20 years of caring for abandoned animals.

  Both dogs are now in the care of Limerick Animal Welfare, and the organisation has appealed for donations to help keep them alive. Spolesperson Niamh Allen said that one of the dogs was in such a bad condition that the organisation was unable to confirm his breed, but believed he might be a poodle.

  The young dog – named Aesop after the writer of c6hildren’s fables about animals – was found wandering on the Cork/Limerick border. He was ravaged by mange, having lost nearly all the hair on his body, and was unable to open his badly infected eyes.

  Ms Allen said it would have taken many painful months of neglect for Aesop to end up in such a state.

  “His face was one of the saddest sights we have ever witnessed. His eyes were full of pain and he had to be the loneliest dog in the world.”

Another dog recently rescued by Limerick Animal Welfare – a lurcher named Lily – was suffering from malnutrition.

  Volunteers believe she was close to death when she was found. She had lost nearly all her hair from mange infection and volunteers believe that she may have given birth to pups recently.

  Ms Allen ha said there was no guarantee that either Lily or Aesop would live and appealed for donations to help look after them.

  It costs approximately €1,000 every day for Limerick Animal Welfare to look after up to 70 dogs and 40 cats that are currently in its care. The rescued animals are boarded in commercial kennels across the midwest region, but the first phase of a long-awaited sanctuary on lands purchased in Kilfinane, Co Limerick, is due to open next month.

  Phase one of the sanctuary is estimated to cost up to €500,000, and Limerick Animal Welfare is seeking donations to meet the shortfall.

  Anyone wishing to make a donation can do so online at www.limerickanimalwelfare.com or at the organisation’s charity shop at 12b Upper Cecil St, Limerick.



Puppy found in pool of blood after brutal hammer attack

Irish Independent, 25/01/2005

Thugs have left an eight-week-old puppy unable to see after smashing her head open with a hammer.

  The vicious attack on the tiny terrier Dana Scully – named after ‘The X-files’ character – took place last week in the Moyross area of Limerick city.

  The little pup was found lying in a pool of blood at a hedge near the sprawling estate by locals.

  “She had blood pouting from her head. We believe she was hit with a hammer. The injuries to her head were very severe and it looked as if she was about to die,” said Marion Fitzgibbon of Limerick Animal Welfare.

The pup underwent surgery to drain fluid from her head at a local veterinary clinic. Veterinary nurse Ciara Walsh, who worked on the puppy, said: “The top of her head was smashed open. This is one of the worst cases of animal abuse I have ever come across.”

  The pup is now in a stable condition, but not yet out of the woods.

  “She cannot see a thing in front of her at all. The swelling still has not gone down so we will have to wait and see,” she said.

The savage attack is the latest in a series carried out in on pets in the city.

  Last month, a greyhound was rescued in the Southill area as young thugs were about to impale it with nails.




Cruel Farmer Wants Votes

Irish News of the World, 22/03/2009

A famer, sentenced to four months in jail for “utterly awful” cruelty to animals, is running for a county council seat.  Tyre dealer Richard Smith’s crimes were so extreme, the LSPCA asked he be given a lifetime ban from herding animals.  But Smith, 48, has now announced he will contest the Adare electoral area of Limerick in June’s local vote.

  In January, Smith, who owns Richie Tyres in Kilmallock Road, Limerick, was convicted of cruelty at his farm at Lemonfield, Crecora.  He admitted two counts of cruelty cows and not tending his herd on March 15 last year.

  The jail sentence is currently under appeal but Smith is not denying the seriousness of what happened.


Ashamed

He said: “It was a very dark period in my life and it is something I will be ashamed of for the rest of my life. I stand by my guilty plea and there is no question of me not holding my hands up to what happened.”

   Limerick District Court heard that one badly-injured cow had its back legs tied to a tractor and was dragged through a field and left to die.  Other animals were starving and rotting carcases were left lying in sheds and in the farm yard.

  Judge Tom O’Donnell, who handled the case, said deplorable pain and suffering had been inflicted on Smith’s herd.  He described the offences as “utterly awful” and said the pictures of he ill-treated animals were among the most upsetting he had ever come across.

  If elected as an Independent councillor Smith says he will mount a campaign for the introduction of a compulsory retirement age of 65 for politicians. He also wants bin collections to be taken over by the local authority.

  Mr Smith said: “I believe in public service for the people. My family has a long connection with politics and it is something I always wanted to do. I believe I can give something back to society without costing a fortune.


Valuable

“I am a people person and I believe that I have a valuable contribution to make to the process. I believe I can bring an open voice to the table and conviction on matters that I would be fairly passionate about. At the end of the day, I am a bread and butter person and things like maintaining roads and encouraging businesses within the Adare electoral area would be important to me.”



llegal fireworks used to kill pets

Animals strapped to deadly bangers

The Star, 06/10/2004

Illegal fireworks and bangers are being strapped to puppies and kittens before being ignited and set off in a number of Limerick c6ity estates it was claimed today.  Young animals have been killed or seriously maimed by “gangs of youths who take perverse pleasure” from tying the fireworks to pups and kittens, a gardai source told the Star.

  The source added that it’s a growing problem across a number of Limerick city suburbs.

  “It has happened in the past in a number of suburbs including Ballinacurra Weston, Saint Mary’s Park, Moyross and Southill.

  “Gangs of youths and teenagers are the culprits. It is a terrible thing to hear about,” said the source.


Week

One Weston resident claimed residents and pet owners on the city’s southside are “terrified” about fireworks in the weeks before Halloween.

  “They see this as a perverse form of pleasure. They tie the fireworks or bangers to the bac6ks of puppies and kittens before setting them off.

  “They often stick the fireworks into the ground before lighting them to see will the animals shoot into the air. They kill or seriously injure the pups or kittens involved,” reported the Weston woman.

A Garda spokesman for Henry Street Crime Prevention Office reports that fireworks are in circulation around the city.

  “Fireworks are still illegal in this country and have been sourced illegally by criminal gangs and are very dangerous as there is no proper standard or quality control.

  “I want to appeal to parents in particular to be alert for children having fireworks in their possession. Elderly neighbours are often a target for young thugs who for some reason find it amusing to terrorise an older person by throwing fireworks in their door or letterbox,” said the spokesman.

Niamh Allen of Limerick Animal Welfare said: “There are animals being killed or maimed mysteriously at this time of year – it is very sad.

“The fireworks and bangers drive dogs and pets crazy. It is very important to keep pets indoors in the evenings.”



Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

I  nspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

  “It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

  The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

  “The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”



Mutilated coursing dogs found dumped on Limerick beach.

Irish Independent, 04/06/2009

Three mutilated greyhounds, believed to have been coursing dogs, were found dumped at a popular bathing spot in Limerick. The Limerick Leader has reported that the animals had their ears cut off so that the owners could not be identified. This is just the latest act of appalling barbarity against Irish greyhounds.


Greyhounds on Viagra.

Limerick Post, 11/12/2004

A SPOKESPERSON from Greyhound Action Ireland has claimed that "drugs like Viagra are constantly being sold at dog racing tracks in Ireland and greyhounds are suffering horrifically from the hell of withdrawal symptoms”. Some dogs are even given cocaine to boost their performances, she claims. Limerick is regarded as being one of the Meccas for greyhound racing and training in the country, with races three days a week at the greyhound racing track at the Markets Field. Prize money can range from 200 euro to over 35,000 euro in sweep stakes and the sport attracts a huge interest in the city. Talking to the Limerick Post, Bernie Wright said that "this drug is sold by pushers who have obtained it on prescription from MDs” and the practice is allowed to continue because "there is very little testing”. "Viagra, which is given to quicken the heart-rate of the dogs, is a major racket at Irish dog racing tracks. Dogs are suffering horrifically and routinely at the hands of trainers and owners. They should not be subjected to the hell of withdrawal symptoms from drugs such as EPO, a steroid that shows no traces or Largactyl, a sedative also used at dog tracks to slow dogs down. We in Greyhound Action appeal to anyone who has further information on drugs being used to contact us immediately. They can remain anonymous,” said Ms Wright. She also said that "cocaine is also given to dogs to improve their performance”. Ms Wright then referred to a recent article which appeared in a national newspaper, recounting how a greyhound trainer who tried to inject his dog with drugs, accidentally injected himself.



Wild heifer shot dead at Kilmallock mart

Independent.ie, 13/08/2014

A LIMERICK mart was forced to shoot a heifer that became completely unmanageable during its weekly sale at Kilmallock last week.

  Mart manager, PJ Buckley made the decision to shoot the Limousin heifer in the interests of public health and safety.

  Over 1,000 animals were going under the hammer at Kilmallock on the day and over 200 buyers were present at the time of the incident which happened just after lunchtime at Monday's sale last week.

  The last time such drastic action was required at Kilmallock was over 12 years ago, according to mart spokesman, Denis Buckley.

  The heifer, which was one of a draft sent to the mart by a local farmer, became unruly in her pen and broke out into the coral area which adjoins the mart.

  Several attempts by mart staff to coax the unruly animal back into her pen were unsuccessful and soon it became obvious that drastic action would have to be considered.

  "The animal could have crossed an area which was used by staff and people attending the mart and as you know humans and animals do not match in this type of situation," explained Mr Kirby.

  "There have been too many farm accidents this year and the mart was not going to be responsible for another agri-related accident. It all became a question of being safe rather than sorry," he added.

When it became obvious that the animal could not be restrained the mart called in a competent local rifleman, and he dispatched the heifer into a ditch adjoining the pens with a single shot.

  Buyers and sellers attending the mart were unaware of what was going on outside and business at the weekly sale was unaffected by the incident.

  Similar Limousin heifers currently command an average price of €1,100 and the mart management subsequently came to an agreement with the vendor farmer on compensation for the shot heifer.

  The remaining animals in the farmer's draft were successfully sold later at the mart.

"This is a very rare incident. The animal was not kicking 
or bawling but became completely unmanageable," said Mr Kirby.



Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds

Irish Times, 12/04/2014

The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”.

Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.



Man on sex with alsatian charge sent forward for trial

Irish Independent, 14/07/2011

A 57-year-old man appeared in court in Limerick today on one count of buggery with a German Shepherd dog connected with the suspicious death of a woman.S

  Sean McDonnell, of Churchill Meadows, Raheen, Limerick was sent forward for trial at the Circuit Court in relation to the incident.

  Mother-of-four Carol Hickey (43) died on October 7 2008 when she became unwell at a house in Patrickswell.

  McDonnell is charged with buggery of the animal at 26 Laurel Park, Patrickswell, Co Limerick on October 7 2008.

  A garda investigation following Mrs Hickey’s death resulted in the arrest and charging of the accused man.

  He was today served with the Book of Evidence in the case at Limerick District Court and sent forward for trial at the next sitting of the Circuit Court later this year.

Mrs Hickey was from Galbally, Co Limerick where she was the secretary of the local community association.



Bus driver avoids prison in bestiality case

Limerick Post, 19/12/2012

A BUS driver has been given a three-year suspended sentence in a buggery case described by Circuit Court Judge Carroll Moran as “socially repugnant – even in these tolerant times”.

  Sean McDonnell (58) of Churchill Meadows, Raheen, was convicted of the charge of buggery with an Alsatian on October 7, 2008 after a woman was “found in an unresponsive state” after she had sex with a dog owned by Mr McDonnell. The mother of three was pronounced dead in hospital later that night.

  Limerick Circuit Court heard that the father of three had posted messages regarding bestiality on the internet through which he encountered the woman. A laptop computer owned by Mr McDonnell was found to have accessed a bestiality website with over 1.5million hits in a five month period. This, Judge Carroll Moran said, was a “shocking” aggravating factor in the case.

  When the woman became unresponsive during the sexual activity, Mr McDonnell called the emergency services. Dr Aine Moran pronounced the woman dead at the Mid Western Regional hospital but a post-mortem carried out by Dr Maria Cassidy was unable to determine an exact cause of death.

  Mr McDonnell voluntarily went to Roxboro Garda Station in April, 2009 and his home was searched and a German Shepherd was found. Three computers and technical analysis of mobile phone contacts also formed part of the State’s case and the court was told that Mr McDonnell’s admissions were helpful to the prosecution. Analysis carried out by animal genetic scientists showed that fluids and semen matched the DNA of Mr McDonnell’s dog.

  Defending counsel Isobel Kennedy SC, said that the woman “sought out the activity” and since her death, Mr McDonnell was in the “unenviable position of having to plead guilty as the principal offender”. Judge Moran said the guilty party, who is a separated father, had been employed as a bus driver but lost his job because of the adverse publicity and moved to England where he sought counselling from The Priory Clinic.  However, due to financial difficulties, he was unable to avail of their treatment and was now embarking upon “long-term counselling” from an independent provider.

  The court previously heard that Mr McDonnell’s name was added to the register of sex offenders’ and any person on the register is disqualified from having a haulage licence for a vehicle which carries more than nine people. This, the judge said, along with the “enormous adverse publicity”, was severe punishment for the accused.

  During the sentencing hearing last week, Judge Carroll Moran said that even in these “tolerant times”, acts of bestiality were considered “socially repugnant”.   The defendant could have received anything up to life imprisonment but Judge Moran said it was a “very tragic case in which a woman died” and the outcome of the events  could not have been foreseen.

Amid emotional scenes, he was sentenced to three years in prison, suspended for a period of three years. His name was added to the sex offenders’ register for a period of five years. The court is to be provided with quarterly updates on his continuing counselling for the period of the suspended sentence.




Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

  Inspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

“It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

“The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers

will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which   the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”