Kildare

Raid netted biggest ever seizure of animal drugs.
Irish Independent, 30/04/1997.

A 62-year-old Kildare man has been sentenced to eight months in jail and fined a total of £22,000 for importing and selling "Angel Dust" and other illegal substances. Newbridge District Court heard the raid which led to yesterday's prosecution netted the biggest seizure of prohibited substances in the history of the State.  see more


Judge orders cock fight duo to pay fines.

Irish Independent, 25/03/1998

Two men were ordered to pay ₤200 each to the ISPCA when they admitted attending a cockfight.  see more

Guilty of neglecting animal

Kildare Nationalist, 19/05/2000

A farmer who cruelly ill-treated a cow was told to pay £120 to the vet who carried out an examination on behalf of the gardaí, Athy District Court heard last week.  see more


Raid netted biggest ever seizure of animal drugs

Irish Independent, 30/04/1997

A 62-year-old Kildare man has been sentenced to eight months in jail and fined a total of £22,000 for importing and selling “Angel Dust” and other illegal substances. Newbridge District Court heard the raid which led to yesterday’s prosecution netted the biggest seizure of prohibited substances in the history of the State. Former businessman, Diarmuid O’keeffe, of Cutbush, The Curragh, pleaded guilty to a total of 22 charges involving the illegal import, sale and possession of Clenbuterol (Angel Dust), antibiotics and hormones in two separate locations in Kildare and Newbridge on a number of dates in September 1991. Senior Department of Agriculture officials told the court that the substances seized were used to increase the value of cattle but posed serious risks to human health. The raid netted 771 litres of Clenbuterol and 26 kilos of the same drug in powder form. There were also 500 bottles of hormone cocktails and 6,500 doses of hormone pellets. The quantity seized was enough to dose 20,000 animals. That figure didn’t include other substances found in the mixing plant. The value of the substances, which were the subject of the charges, was £230,000 on the black market. The value of the other substances seized, but not the subject of the charges, was £196,000.



Cruelty case farmer is getting treatment

Sunday World, 14/11/1999

A farmer who starved more than 200 animals to death earlier this year is receiving treatment from a psychologist, a court heard this week.

A district court in Kilcock, Co Kildare was told this week that Donal Fitzpatrick, Baltracey, Donadea, Naas, who is facing 59 charges of cruelty to animals, was not in a position to proceed with the case.

Solicitor Eddie Timmons told Judge John Brophy that he had just been assigned to the case and needed time to be properly briefed.

He added that his client was now receiving treatment from a [some mistake in the original article]. The court also heard that Fitzpatrick’s previous solicitor Donal Houlihan had not been contacted by Fitzpatrick since the last court sitting in October, and now wished to ‘come off record.’

Remarking that 199 sheep had died on Fitzpatrick’s lands, Judge Brophy said that it would be necessary for the psychologist, Dr Curry to attend in court to give sworn evidence in relation to the defendant.

Sgt Tom Neville, prosecuting, told the judge that as the garda involved in the case, Sgt Nolan from Carbury, would not be available for the December sitting, he had no objection to a longer adjournment.

Judge Brophy adjourned the hearing to January 25 next.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

SAVAGE: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart tow blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.

And they spend five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brocklagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.  Five men were found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.

Offence

A jury in Naas district court found another man not guilty.  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondakin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all male jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.

  The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other by the neck,” Garda Steve Kinneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of € 12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Five men found guilty of ill-treating animals by attending dog fight

Irish Independent, 14/07/2005

Five men have been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight, in the first case of its kind in the state.  see more



History made as dog fight swoop lands handler in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.

  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in the history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Dreegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.



Man jailed for organising cruel and bloody dogfight

Irish Independent, 29/07/2005

A 35-year-old man has been jailed for 18 months for cruelty to animals during a dogfight in the first case of its kind in the State.

  Another four men were given suspended sentences and fined at Naas circuit court yesterday after being found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals in 2003.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, was jailed for 18 months by Judge Pat McCartan yesterday. It also emerged that he had previously been convicted and fined €6,475 for cruelty to six pitbull terriers found in neglect at his home.

  Yesterday’s sentencing was welcomed by the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) who said that the practice "is not acceptable in this day and age."

  The trial had heard that a team of gardai and inspectors from the ISPCA had raided a Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody clinch in a corrugated steel pen. The two pitbull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. Such was the ferocity of the fight between the dogs that a ladder was needed to separate them.

  Yesterday, Judge McCartan said it was a “mean and nasty offence where the animals were used for a purpose never designed”. The five men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals.

  All had pleaded not guilty to the charges. It is the first time that such a case has been heard in the State.

  Each of the men faced a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years imprisonment. Judge McCartan said he was “fairly certain” that but for the intervention of the Gardai, one or both of the dogs would have died in tht fight.

  There was also significant organisation in putting together the event by building the ring that was found and putting down a carpet so the dogs would have a better grip, he said.

  While Jordan now faces jail, Richard Somerville from Navan Road, Cabra, Dublin was ordered to pay €3,000 to the ISPCA and his sentence would be suspended.

Karl Breen of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin, Dublin received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the ISCPCA, while Thomas Codd of Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght had to pay €500 to have his none-month sentence suspended.

  David Deegan of Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght received an 18-month sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the animal welfare body.



Three accused of Badger baiting at Kinnegad

Meath Chronicle, 08/03/1997

Three Kildare defendants summonsed with a number of alleged offences, including assisting in the baiting of a badger and a fox, had their cases adjourned to 11th April next at Trim Court next week.

  Peter Maher, Grangeclare, Knockcor, Carbury, is summonsed with wilfully interfering with and for destroying the breeding place of a protected wild animal, at Colehill, Kinnegad, on 25th February last; entering on the lands of Laurence Finn for the purposes of hunting wild birds or animals without the permission of the owner; causing, procuring or assisting in the baiting of a badger and a fox; carrying a spade and shovel capable of being used for the hunting of a wild bird or animal, on the lands of Laurence Finn without his permission; giving a false name and address contrary to section 69 of the Wildlife Act, 1976, and failing to give a correct name and address on a demand made pursuant to section 72 of the Wildlife Act, 1976.

  John Casey, Coolcarrigan, and Patrick Mulligan, Knockcor, Carbury, were summonsed also, with the first four charges.



Men admit to interfering with badger set

Examiner, 26/04/1997

Three men who admitted interfering with the set of a badger were described as blackguards by a Judge yesterday.

  Judge John Brophy also threatened to remand them in custody for a week when they appeared before Trim District Court. One of the men, Peter Maher, Grangeclare, Robenstown, was remanded in custody for a week.

  The court heard he had given a false name and address to a wildlife ranger.

  Maher along with John Casey (32), Coolcarrigan and Patrick Mulligan Jnr (28, Knockmore, Carbury was charged with entering lands without the owner’s permission on February 25, 1996 at Colehill, Kinnegad. The three also admitted interfering/destroying the breeding place of a protected wild animal and carrying a spade and shovel capable of being used for the hunting of a wild bird or animal.

  Solicitor Cora Higgins said the men had been given permission to hunt on lands belonging to a particular person and were doing that when a fox moved across onto other land. Judge Brophy said that there was no fox and if any part of a badger had been found in the set Ms Higgins clients would be going to jail for 3 months.

  He said they had dug 1.3 metres deep into the set.

  “The badger is a protected animal, this is a well known set in the area and they deliberately had two dogs and another dog in the boot. If a badger catches you he won’t let go, it is his only defence, it is disgusting,” said the Judge. The Judge added that if the Wilidlife Act permitted it, the defendants would be going to jail.

  A photograph of Maher had to be circulated to garda stations to get him identified and the other defendants allowed him to give false information to the ranger, they went along with the charade, Judge Brophy added.

  He remanded Maher in custody for a week to appear again in Trim Court next Friday.

  He imposed fines on the other defendants and in relation to Casey disqualified him from driving for 12 months using his car in connection with the offence.


Five-year gun licence ban for badger hunters

Examiner, 30/01/1998

Two Co. Kildare men were banned from holding firearm licences for five years and fined £40 each when they failed to have District Court convictions over a badger hunting incident, overturned at Trim Circuit Court yesterday.

  Evidence had been given at an earlier hearing by wildlife ranger, john Moore, of seeing John Casey, Coolcarrigan, and Peter Maher, Grangeclare, Robertstown, approach a badger set in a field near Kinnegad, on January 25, 1996.

  The defendants were seen carrying spades and sticks.

  After hearing that one of the part had already given the ranger a false name, Judge Pat McCartan told them: “Badger-baiting was to be the entertainment that day. You knew exactly what you were about, it’s a pity the penalties I can impose are so meagre, as I’m tempted to send both of you to jail.

  “What particularly disturbs me is that badgers are a much maligned and beautiful animal, who will fight to the death to protect their homes.

  “Both of you were aware of this and were armed with spades and sticks because of it.

  “No Irishman, and certainly no countryman, should be involved in such a thing. I hope you are both suitably ashamed of your actions.

  “The message can go out loud and clear to all gun club members, that this type of incident won’t be tolerated. One of you is secretary of your local gun club and perhaps when they see you both lost your gun licence for five years, they’ll get the hint.”

Donations totalling £1,400 were paid by the men to various animal charities.



Security chief fined £500 for dog cruelty

Irish Independent, 03/10/1997

An award winning dog owner was fined £500 and banned from using the animals for commercial security after a court heard how he kept a Cerman Shepherd in a filthy burnt-out building without proper food or water.

  Security firm owner Paul Bracken, of Avondale, Leixlip, Co Kildare, was convicted of cruelly treating a 13-year-old bitch named Cresta. A further charge of cruelly ill-treating a five-year-old make called Prince was dismissed.

  Dublin District Court heard the animals were found guarding the burnt-out nightclub section of the Embankment pub in Tallaght on October 16 last by DSPCA inspector Robert Kenny.

  The DSPCA claimed Cresta was grossly undernourished, sleeping on urine and faeces soaked carpet and Prince was slightly undernourished and kept in a diesel soaked boilerhouse.

  Judge Desmond Hogan said he accepted the prosecution evidence.

  Mr Bracken told the court the dogs were fed every day by himself or one of the security guards he employed on the premises. He said the dogs were there to keel “the lads company”.

  “I have had German Shepherds all my life and I am madly in love with them. I have showed them and trained them,” he said.

Judge Hogan said he accepted Embankment manager Mark Fay’s evidence that there had not been proper feeding.

  He ordered that Cresta, who has since regainedfull health, should remain in a foster home and that Prince should stay with Mr Bracken providing he was only used as a family pet.



Man who watched Co Kildare cock-fight fined £300

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched a cock-fight in a Co Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs.

  The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, which was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured.

  Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse.

  Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10.45 a.m. on July 6th, 1997.  Giving evidence yesterday, Garda Fahy said Dunne’s Nissan Primera car had been found parked near the location of the cock-fight at Grangemageny. Two bags with one cockerel inside each were discovered at the rear of the car, he said.

  Hugh Behan, who was convicted in February in relation to the same incident, said he had met and spoken with Dunne in the market at Athy. Dunne said there was “an exhibition” of birds taking place on that Sunday morning, and he agreed to go with him.

  After the Garda had arrived at the field, Behan said he had to be helped over a gate. But he insisted that he saw no cock-fighting take place and denied that Dunne had any cockerels in his car.

  Dunne told the court that he sat in a ditch after the Garda arrived at the field, and that he stayed there for four hours. He admitted being present at the incident, but denied cruelty charges.

  Judge Mary Martin fined Dunne £200 and ordered him to pay £100 towards veterinary expenses.  The case was adjourned to June 9th, to allow the fine to be paid.

  After the hearing the Irish Counc6il Against Bloodsports expressed deep disappointment at the fine and said laughter from the public gallery during the case suggested that the cock-fighting incident had not been taken seriously.

  “It was treated like a joke and trivialised. It is a sad day for those who campaign against cruelty to animals,” said a spokeswoman, Ms Aideen Yourell.



Stud farmer jailed for animal cruelty

Irish Times, 06/2007

A stud farmer has been sent to prison for animal cruelty after an ISPCA inspector found a horse in his care to have injuries, including pus oozing from his head and a foul smell coming from a wound 15cm long and 3cm deep across his nose.

  Eamon Salmon of Fort barrington Athy, Co Kildare, was convicted and sentenced to three months imprisonment over the incident on September 1st, 2006, when ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes, accompanied by gardai, inspected a premise at Ballylehane Lower, Ballylinan, and found a yearling in what he described as “considerable distress.”

  Mr Hughes told the court that the wound had been caused by a head collar and it was suggested in court that the collar appeared to be too tight and that there was flesh growing over the collar.

  “I was concerned for the welfare of the horse. He would not allow me to put a hand on him. It would obviously have been extremely sore to touch. He was tossing his head up and down. There was a lot pus and ooze coming through the head collar and a foul smell coming from the wound. There was not a doubt in my mind that the horse needed attention.”

Judge Eamonn O’Brien was told that it took the ISPCA inspector and gardai a number of hours to take the animal into their care, owing to the level of terror experienced by the horse.

  The horse was traced back to the ownership of Salmon as it was found on his land with other animals belonging to him.  Salmon was later visited by two ISPCA inspectors and evidence was given in court that during the meeting, he admitted ownership of the horse.  He was asked to surrender the animal to the ISPCA and signed an acceptance from doing so.

  After this was done, Mr Hughes said that the defendant “became extremely annoyed” and said: “’I know that’s all you wanted to do all along – get me into court. You can’t prove the yearling belongs to me. He has no chip’.” (He was referring to the micro-chips which allow animal ownership to be traced).

The defendant told the court that the horse was not his and that he had “sold it on”.

  When the judge asked who the owner was and whether that person could be brought to court, he replied: “No, he is six months dead.”

  Garda Inspector Jerry Coonan put it to Salmon that this was his horse but that it was a horse “of limited ability or a reject” and that it was being kept on these lands, away from his stud farm, so that people coming to the farm could not see it.

The judge described photographs of the horse submitted to the court as “appalling”.



11 to be tried for animal cruelty

Irish Times, 20/04/2005

The trial of 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare will begin at Naas Circuit Court in July.  The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare. The men have all been charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act, 1911.

  Yesterday Judge Patrick McCartan said the case was of priority and it should be the first heard in the next court session which begins on July 5th.

  “it’s the type of case, if left lingering in the list, it will never get out of the traps,” he said.

He immediately said he had not intended the use of such wards as a rumble of suppressed laughter spread around the court.  The Judge was informed the case would take approximately a week and would require a jury.

  Seven counsel are representing the men, some of whom requested further disclosure of specific documents.

  Judge McCartan was informed there would be 17 witnesses involved in the trial.  He suggested that all parties return to court in mid-June to ensure that all issues of disclosure had been revolved before the trial proceeded.

  The defendants are on bail on their own bond of €500 and are expected to plead not guilty to the charges.

The accused are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.



Garda saw men flee dog fight

Evening Herald, 08/07/2005

A garda described how he came across a dog fight in progress when he raided a Kildare farm.  When gardai burst in, several men fled the scene.  Gardai and members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) had taken part in the raid on the buildings on private lands, Sgt Con O’Sullivan said.  When the door of the building at Brockagh in Robertstown was opened on the morning of October 31, 2003 three or four men had ran away towards open fields, he explained.

  The raid had come about after information that the dog figh1t was going on.  Three or four vehicles were parked outside the farm buildings, Sgt O’Sullivan told Naas Circuit Court.  The raid happened at 11am on a bank holiday Friday where gardai found two distressed dogs in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial, which is estimated to take another four days, will hear evidence from a number of gardai from Newbridge and Robertstown stations as well as members of the ISPCA.

  The nine accused men are: Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.

  One of the charges, under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, is that the men cruelly ill-treated two animals while the other stated they assisted in the fighting of animals.

After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two other accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.



Two men found not guilty in illegal dog fighting case

Irish Independent, 08/07/2005

Two men charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight in Co Kildare have been found not guilty because of an absence of evidence.  John Moody of Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue, and Anthony Burke of Corstwon, Oldcastle, Co Meath, were releas,07ed on the direction of Judge Patrick McCartan at Naas circuit court yesterday.  The two were on trial along with nine others. The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.  All of the men pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting.

  After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two of the accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.

  Earlier Sgt Con O’Sullivan of Newbridge Garda Station said that when he entered a farm building at Brockagh he found two dogs fighting each other in a specially constructed ring.  When the door of the building was opened, three or four men ran away.

  During the raid, by members of the gardai and the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, two distressed dogs were found in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial of the other nine men is estimated to take another four days and will continue on Tuesday.



Rescued: Savaged animals found in a pen during raid on farmhouse

Evening Herald, 07/07/2005

Cash found in raid on ‘dog fight’

Two dogs who were pitted against each other to the death were saved by gardai after officers swooped on a farmhouse in the middle of an illegal dog fight, it is alleged.  The savaged animals were found in a pen in the farm house at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, a court heard.  The raid, which also involved members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA), came on foot of confidential information received by the gardai.

  Eleven men were charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight at Naas Circuit Court.

  The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare. All pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting in the court.

  Counsel for the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) said some of the men on the farm were found with money on them when officers arrived at the scene.  He also said a number of other men may got away after they ran when the raid started.

The 11 accused men are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham, all in Dublin.



Charges against two dropped in illegal dogfight case in Kildare

Irish Times, 08/07/2005

The case against two of the 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare was dropped yesterday.

  Judge Patrick McCartan told the jury he would be directing a not-guilty verdict in relation to Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath, and John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue. He sad there was not enough evidence to connect them to the alleged dog fight.

  Most of the day was taken up with legal argument in the absence of the jury.

  The remaining defendants face charges on two counts of animal cruelty. They are Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, River Road, Allenwood, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham. The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st 2003, in a shed at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare.

  The court was earlier told that when gardai arrived at the shed that morning shortly after 11am, several men ran from the building and were followed by the officers. On entering the shed, the gardai noticed that there were two dogs in a galvanised ring fighting each other. There were also several men in the shed.

The case has been adjourned until July 12th.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

Savage: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart two blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.  And they spent five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brockagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.

  Five men were found guilty of cruelty ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.


Offence

A jury in Naas circuit court found the five men guilty and another man not guilty.

  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

  Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all make jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other day by the neck,” Garda Steve Kenneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Man faces dog fight charge

Irish Independent, 18/02/2005

A Dublin man charged in connection with an illegal dog fight at Robertstown, Co Kildare has been sent forward for trial to Naas Circuit Criminal Court on April 19.

Karl Breen, of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin was remanded in custody with consent to bail on his own bond of €300 and an independent surety of €600.



Dogfight case is adjourned

Irish Times, 18/11/2004

The case against 12 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight was adjourned until December 16th at Naas District Court yesterday.  The defence requested the adjournment because it said it needed more time to consider the matter.  The alleged offec6es are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.



History made as dog fight swoop lands handle in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in thbe8 history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunary Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Deegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.



Man who watched Co. Kildare cock-fight fined £300.

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched cock-fight in a Co. Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs. The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, whic6h was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured. Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co. Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse. Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10:45am on July 6th, 1997.



Cruelty to greyhounds

Irish Examiner, 24/10/2009

Thomas Daly with an address at Ballyhagen, Carbury, Co. Kildare was convicted of cruelty to two greyhounds at Kildare District Court.  

  The court here that ISPCA chief inspector Conor Dowling found a greyhound bitch living in a filthy cattle trailer and a greyhound dog in a small mucky pen with no shelter or bedding.

  Judge Desmond Zaidan gave Daly a three-month custodial sentence on each count to run concurrently. The accused was fined €1, 1150 on each count and ordered to pay expense of



Leinster Leader, 28/10/2009

Twenty-year-old Thomas Daly, of Ticknevin, Carbury, pleaded guilty before the court to two charges of starving two greyhounds.



The men were stopped by gardaí on the N4 shortly after the shooting.

The Journal.ie, 17/12/2013

FIVE MEN HAVE been released without charge after a horse was shot dead in Kildare yesterday afternoon.

  The men were stopped in their van by gardaí on the N4 close to the Celbridge interchange and were arrested for questioning.  A  gun was also recovered.

  The horse was shot dead in a field outside Kilcock, on the Clane road.

  Mary Lawlor from the Kildare and West Wicklow Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, told TheJournal.ie that: It’s horrific what’s happening out there at the moment. I think the cruelty element to horses is definitely getting worse.

  The Irish Independent reports that the shooting is part of an ongoing feud between two gangs in the district and that this is the second horse to be shot over the feud.

A file is being prepared for the DPP.