Fermanagh

Irish horse breeder in import ban

Sunday People, 24/4/2001

A Top Irish horse breeder and Grand National training legend has been left raging after being accused of illegally exporting bulls’ semen. Billy Rock who launched the career of top jockey Tony McCoy, faces charges of bringing the fluid into the Republic without a license. Rock and two other men will be fighting the charges in court but Billy has been suspended from the sperm import trade until the matter is settled. His business activities at his Co. Antrim farm are breeding horses and importing bulls’ semen for artificial insemination. The two other men charged are Robert Cameron from Mansfield Road, Mauchline, Ayrshire and James Ernest Campbell from ‘Lawnfield’, Tempo, Co. Fermanagh. A court hearing in regard to the allegations of three years ago has been suspended a number of times due to unavailability of witness due to the foot and mouth outbreak but it is finally due to go ahead in June.



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-25323551), 10/12/2013

Cock-fighting is a practice that has been illegal for almost 200 years.

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting. The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations. There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing. At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels. A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed. Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.

Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border. At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh. On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring. These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.  Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.



Judge adjourns case where cattle left to ‘die and starve’  

Times, 28/04/2009

John Maguire, Clonee House, Ederney, Co. Fermanagh faced a number of charges in relation to failing to record the movements of his cattle on the holdings, having wrong tag numbers in breach of Bovine TB and Brucellosis in Cattle Orders, failing to collect the carcasses of six cattle which died in some manner other than by having been slaughtered.  

  The offences are alleged to have happened on dates in October 2006, and February and June 2007.  

  Having view photographic evidence of rotting carcasses, Judge McLaughlin expressed the view that animals were left to “die and basically starve”.

  The case was adjourned until May 6th.



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC, 10/12/2013

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting.

  The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations.

  There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing.

  At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels.

  A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed.

  Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.


Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border.

  At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh.

  On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring.

  These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.

  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.

Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.



Animal cruelty case farmer hit with lifetime ban

Farmers Weekly, 26/02/2014

A Northern Ireland livestock farmer has been banned from keeping livestock for life after his father died and the farm fell into disrepair.

  William Beacom of Middle Farm, Trasna Road, Maguiresbridge, was handed the lifetime ban and a four-month prison sentence suspended for three years after being found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering and failing to properly care for animals on his farm.

  Mr Beacom, 30, was also found guilty of failing to prevent animals from accessing the carcass of a farmed animal.

  Enniskillen Magistrates Court heard that government officials discovered more than 20 decaying cattle, sheep, pig and poultry carcasses, while starving cattle were found in direct contact with dead animals.

  Dard veterinary staff who visited the farm every day between 21 March 2013 and 20 April 2013 also found a build-up of dung in cattle sheds and three cows and calves being kept in a silage pit without water.

  In another instance a cow was found dead underneath a drinking container.

  Dard staff said they were shocked at the conditions and the “above normal” mortality rate at the farm.

  Despite repeated visits from officials, the court heard Mr Beacom was unable to meet his livestock’s basic requirements of providing food, water and dry bedding.

  Defence barrister Craig Patton said conditions on the farm had deteriorated following the death of Mr Beacom’s father, which had left him unable to access the single farm payment.

  Poor silage, his mother’s health problems and the suicide of his grain supplier had all affected Mr Beacom’s mental state and left him unable to find money to sustain the farm.

  While he knew what was happening was not right, Mr Beacom was £20,000 in debt and had no idea what to do, said Mr Patton.

  His mental health had been so badly affected that a local psychiatrist was concerned he was going to take his own life, he added.

  Since facing prosecution, Mr Beacom had sold the farm’s livestock and hoped to rebuild his credibility in the farming world by undertaking farm management courses, the court was told.

  Sentencing Mr Beacom, district judge Nigel Broderick said while the death of his father, his mother’s illness and cashflow problems were contributing factors, they did not excuse Mr Beacom’s actions.

  Recognising Mr Beacom’s financial situation and mental health concerns, the judge decided not to impose a fine, but said the crimes were serious enough to warrant a custodial sentence.

  Mr Beacom, who has decided to appeal the ruling, was told he could apply to have the lifetime ban revoked after two years.