Donegal

Cattle ring is smashed.

Sunday World, 5/10/2003

A huge cattle smuggling racket along the border has been smashed. The DOA has discovered that false ear tags are being used for animals being smuggled and offered for sale and that the racketterrs are also using identity cards which don’t belong to animals being sold into the Irish meat chain. A number of farmers and cattle dealers in the border counties of Monaghan, Cavan, Louth and Donegal are being quizzed in connection with the racket.



Young puppy kicked to death by Donegal kids

IrishDigest.com (http://www.irishdigest.com/young-puppy-kicked-to-death-by-donegal-kids/ ), 8/1/2011

THREE children, one as young as five, laughed and cheered as they kicked a puppy to death in a Letterkenny ousing estate, the Irish Independent newspaper reports in a shocking and terrible story this morning, which first came to light yesterday on a local radio station.  see more



Activists campaign after donkey dies

Irish Times, January 04/01/2012

Animal lovers have started a campaign to erect a statue in memory of a donkey starved to death in Co Donegal. It was found starving and wasting away in a bed of mud in sheds beside Fanad Lighthouse last Friday.

  Members of the Donegal Donkey Sanctuary rescued the terrified animal but it died a short time later at the sanctuary in Raphoe.  The group also wants to gather as many signatures as possible calling for effective measures to stop this kind of cruelty once and for all.  The petition will be taken by donkey and cart and delivered to Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney at Leinster House.



Young puppy kicked to death by Donegal kids

IrishDigest.com, 08/01/2013

THREE children, one as young as five, laughed and cheered as they kicked a puppy to death in a Letterkenny housing estate, the Irish Independent newspaper reports in a shocking and terrible story this morning, which first came to light yesterday on a local radio station.  see more



Man who drowned kitten ‘a nasty piece of goods’

Irish Independent, 15/03/2006

A 26-year-old man repeatedly and violently threw a three-month-old kitten on the ground before drowning it in a lake, a court heard yesterday.

  Brendan Sweeney, Crickamore, Dungloe, County Donegal had shown himself to be “a nasty piece of goods” according to Judge John O’Donnell who fined him €400 at Dubgloe District Court for cruelty to an animal.

  The defendant blamed his actions on the trauma he was suffering after just breaking up with his girlfriend.

  Garda Gerald Dalton received a complaint on June 20, 2005, from the owner of the kitten in Loughanure village who had been told by students in the house next door that her kitten had been killed the previous day.

  He called to the house and spoke to a sister of the defendant who confirmed that her brother had killed the kitten. She told the garda he had “lost his head” and grabbed the kitten, throwing it on the ground a number of times with force, and then threw it into Loughanure Lake.

  Some weeks later, garda Dalton questioned Brendan Sweeney about the incident. He said he had broken up with the mother of his child, who he was about to marry.

  He had gone to his sister’s house where students staying there were playing with a kitten.

  Sweeney said he picked up the kitten and carried it to the lake, it fell out of his hands a couple of times before he threw it into the lake.

  Speaking afterwards, ISPCA area inspector, Kevin McGinley said he was happy with the conviction but disappointed with the leniency of the fine.



Bodies of mutilated dogs found in river

Irish Times, 01/08/2008

Animal welfare workers were stunned by the extent of cruelty behind the deaths of two unwanted greyhounds. The badly mutilated bodies were recovered this week from a tributary of the river Foyle near St Johnston, Co Donegal.

  Experts reckoned they were about three years old when dumped with weights in the water. They had probably ended their racing lives either through injury or for some other reason and their owner was no longer prepared to give them a home. The ears, where racing greyhounds carry identification marks, were cut off one of the dogs, a male.

  There was part of a rope around the neck of the other, a female, indicating a weight had been attached before she was dropped in the river, probab8ly from a bridge over the Suille river near the Northern Ireland Border. The female’s head had been almost entirely eaten by rats.

  The bodies were spotted floating on Wednesday morning by a loc6al farmer near St Johnston.

ISPCA inspector Kevin McGinley removed the carcases from the river. He was still shocked when he spoke yesterday about the discovery. “It was mind-blowing that such wanton cruelty exists. It just reminds us of the need for people to have a change of attitude towards animal welfare.”

  Mr McGinley said it was not possible to say if the dogs were dead or alive when dumped, because of the decomposition.

  “This is as bad as it gets. People who are capable of doing something like this to animals could be just as capable of human abuse and that worries me.”



Asian man rebuked for dog cruelty

Irish Independent, 10/10/2006

An Asian student whose pet dog had to have a hind leg amputated as a result of “appalling cruelty” has been sharply rebuked by a district court judge.

  Judge Tom Fizpatrick ordered Marco Law of Assaroe View, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, to pay up more than €2,500 when he appeared before him at Ballyshannon District Court.

  “The dog was in extreme pain. A rope had obviously been tied tightly around the leg which was grossly swollen and there was a very strong smell of decaying flesh,” he said.

Law, who studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway, admitted cruelty to the dog, a cross-bred collie called King, on November 30 last year.



DEAD DOGS FOUND AT HOME OF DONEGAL MAN IN ANIMAL CRUELTY CASE

Roscommon Herald, 19/02/2014

A Donegal man has been banned from keeping dogs for 10 years after pleading guilty to seven counts of cruelty to the animals.

  George Cavanagh, of Carrowhugh, Greencastle, Co. Donegal was convicted at Donegal District Court.

  Eighteen dogs were found living in poor conditions at his property and ISPCA inspectors also found the decomposing and unburied carcasses of three other dogs.

The 77-year-old, who refused to give up his dogs voluntarily, was also fined €500.



Bodies of mutilated dogs found in River.

Irish Times, 01/08/2008

Animal welfare workers were stunned by the extent of cruelty behind the deaths of two unwanted greyhounds.The badly mutilated bodies were recovered from the river Foyle near st Johnston Co .Donegal.They were about 3 years old when dumped with weights in the water.The ears were cut off one of the dogs.There was a rope around the neck of the female indicating a weight had been attached before she was dropped in the river.The bodies were found floating by a local farmer.



Donegal woman fined after abandoning dog without food or water

Breaking News.ie, 21/09/2015

A woman from Co Donegal has been banned from keeping animals for four years, after she abandoned a dog with no food or water.

  Natalie Mc Granaghan was also fined €200 at Letterkenny District Court earlier today.

  ISPCA inspectors called to a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co Donegal after reports that a terrier dog was abandoned there.

  Ms Mc Granaghan was traced to her mother's home and initially claimed that the dog had been sold before admitting it hadn't.

  The dog, called Megan, was in a very poor state when found but has since made a full recovery and has been re-homed.

  ISPCA inspector Kevin McGinley said: "The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed.

  "This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan.

  "We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts."



A DONEGAL MAN has been banned from keeping dogs for ten years after he pled guilty to a number of counts of animal cruelty yesterday.

  77-year-old George Cavanagh, with an address at Carrowhugh, Greencastle, Co. Donegal pled guilty to seven counts of cruelty at Carndonagh District Court.

  At that time, ISPCA Officer Kevin McGinley and Gardai inspected Mr. Cavanagh’s home place and an out-farm where they found 18 dogs living in poor conditions.

  Some were tied on short tethers and others confined in sheds and a stationary jeep with inadequate ventilation.

  Many were deprived access to water and suitable shelter and bedding.

  As well as the living conditions of the dogs, the gardaí and inspectors discovered the decomposing and unburied carcasses of three other dogs.

  The court heard how Inspector McGinley had tried to persuade Mr Cavanagh to voluntarily surrender the majority of the dogs to the care of the ISPCA, but that he refused to cooperate.

  Judge Paul Kelly banned Mr. Cavanagh from keeping dogs for ten years and fined him a total of €500. He also ordered that Mr. Cavanagh pay costs of €400 to a vet that accompanied the Gardai and ISPCA on an inspection.

  The vet, Stuart Johnston, requested that his fee be paid to the ISPCA.

  Speaking after the ruling, ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley said

“This case has taken a long time to be finalized and I am pleased that the conclusion was successful. The ban will prevent a similar situation arising again for the foreseeable future”.



An ISPCA inspector and gardaí found two emaciated boxer dogs at the woman’s house a year ago.

The Journal.ie, 06/02/2014

A DONEGAL WOMAN has been convicted of animal cruelty and told that she cannot keep dogs for two years.

The ISPCA said that the Donegal woman was convicted of animal cruelty at Letterkenny District Court today.

  ISPCA Inspector McGinley said of the dogs that were found by him at the woman’s property:

  These dogs were as emaciated as any I have seen in my 14 years with the ISPCA. It is important that those responsible for such severe cruelty are held accountable to send out the message that it will not be tolerated.

  The Donegal woman submitted a guilty plea through her solicitor Frank Dorrian, said the ISPCA.

  They said that the case is related to a call made by ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley and Gardaí to the woman’s address on 15 January 2013, when two emaciated boxer dogs were discovered.

  The ISPCA said that the dogs were two-year-old brothers and were named Oscar and Elmo by rescuers. The canines were surrendered into the care of the ISPCA and taken for veterinary treatment.


Banned

The ISPCA said that Judge Paul Kelly banned Gallagher from keeping dogs for two years.

  He also adjourned the matter until 9 June for final sentencing.

  It was noted in court that the ISPCA had incurred costs of €652.26.

  When Oscar and Elmo were rescued, the vets who examined them gave them a body score of just one out of five.

  The duo went on to make a full recovery at the ISPCA’s National Animal Centre and were later rehomed.



The first successful prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act took place when a Donegal woman pleaded guilty to abandoning her dog with no food or water.

  Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals inspector Kevin McGinley responded to a call on March 12, 2014 following reports that a dog had been abandoned in a rented property in Letterkenny, Co. Donegal.

  McGinley visited the property, and although he could hear a dog inside the house he could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him.

  McGinley became increasingly concerned when there was no response to the note. He returned to the property on March 14 and contacted the Gardai (police) for assistance.

  Small female terrier dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog feces and urine. The dog’s owner Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she claimed initially that the dog called Megan had been sold. She later admitted she hadn’t, but claimed she had fed the dog two days earlier.

  A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, but she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pleaded guilty through her solicitor Kieran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until July 16 and costs of €405 were awarded.

  Judge Paul Kelly said, “Looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenseless animal.”

  Inspector Kevin McGinley said, “The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we were pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been re-homed.

“This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenseless dog like Megan.”



Donegal woman becomes first to be prosecuted under Animal Health and Welfare Act

Breaking News.ie, 20/04/2015

A Donegal woman has become the first person to be successfully prosecuted under the Animal Health and Welfare Act, as she pleaded guilty to abandoning a dog with no food or water.

  A small female terrier dog was found in a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, by ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley on March 14, 2014.

  He had responded to a call two days earlier following reports that a dog had been abandoned there, he could hear a dog inside the house but could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him.

  Inspector McGinley returned on March 14 and contacted the Gardaí and Local Authority for assistance.

  The dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog faeces and urine.

  The dog’s owner, Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she initially said that the dog called Megan had been sold.

  She later admitted she had not sold the dog, but claimed she had fed it two days earlier. A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, however she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pleaded guilty through her solicitor Ciaran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until July 16, 2015, and costs of €405 have been awarded.

  Judge Paul Kelly said: "Looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenceless animal."

  Inspector McGinley said: "The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed.

  "This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan. We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts."

Dr Andrew Kelly, CEO of the ISPCA, said all animal owners have a responsibility to provide for their animals' needs.

  He said: "This is the first conviction under the Animal Health and Welfare Act which came into force in March 2014.

"The ISPCA hopes that this case will send out a message that animal neglect is not acceptable and we will do all we can to end animal abuse in Ireland."



FIRST SUCCESSFUL PROSECUTION UNDER THE ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELFARE ACT AS DONEGAL WOMAN PLEADS GUILTY

Her.ie

First successful prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act as Donegal woman pleads guilty to abandoning dog with no food or water.

  ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley responded to a call on the 12th March 2014 following reports that a dog had been abandoned in a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal.

  ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley visited the property and although he could hear a dog inside the house could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him. Inspector McGinley became increasingly concerned when there was no response to the note and returned to the property on the 14th March and contacted the Gardaí and Local Authority for assistance.

  A small female terrier dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog faeces and urine. The dog’s owner, Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she claimed initially that the dog called Megan had been sold.  She later admitted she hadn’t, but claimed she had fed the dog two days earlier.  A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, however she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pled guilty through her solicitor Ciaran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until 16th July 2015 and costs of €405 have been awarded. Judge Paul Kelly said:  “looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenceless animal.”

  Inspector Kevin McGinley said, “The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed. This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan. We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts.”

  Dr Andrew Kelly, CEO said: “This is the first conviction under the Animal Health and Welfare Act which came into force in March 2014. All animal owners have a responsibility to provide for their animals’ needs. The ISPCA hopes that this case will send out a message that animal neglect is not acceptable and we will do all we can to end animal abuse in Ireland”.

  Minister of Agriculture, Simon Coveney said:  ”I welcome the diligent work of the ISPCA Inspector in bringing this case forward for prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act”.

  If you suspect an animal is being cruelly treated, neglected or abused, please contact the ISPCA National Animal Cruelty Helpline in confidence on 1890 515 515 or report online on www.ispca.ie.



Donegal man convicted of ‘horrific’ animal cruelty

UTV Ireland, 17/11/2015

A 44-year-old Letterkenny man was fined €500 and ordered to pay €456 in costs before Leterkenny District Court by presiding Judge Paul Kelly after he was convicted of eleven counts of animal cruelty.

Adrian Browne pleaded guilty on Monday to causing unnecessary suffering to eleven horses at a property in Trentaboy, Letterkenny.

  The case emerged when ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley and local Gardaí responded to concerns raised at Trentaboy, Letterkenny, Co Donegal on 30 December 2013 when the eleven horses were discovered.

  Four of the horses were humanely euthanized on veterinary advice to prevent any further suffering for the animals.

  Inspector McGinley said that there was no grass available to the horses at the property, and he also noticed an absence of supplementary food.

  “The animals were in a poor to moderate condition with minimal shelter given the fact it was the end of December and the only water available was from a drain.

  “Some of the other horses were in very poor body condition with their back bones and ribs clearly protruding. The animals were living in hardship,” he added.

Inspector McGinley described the case as a “horrific form of cruelty,” adding that it was “unfortunate that defenceless animals had to endure such suffering.”

  When the equines were scanned for microchips, only one was found to be chipped and none were registered to the defendant.

  Mr McGinely admitted that it was more difficult to prosecute responsible parties with the absence of legitimate identification to link animals and their owners.

"It certainly makes things more difficult, because we have to go and find out whose care the horses are in, and then try and link the landowner to the animals, it takes more time," he said.