Dogs (non-greyhounds)

Truck driver denies starving great danes for four weeks.

Irish Independent, 25/09/1997

Eight Great Dane dogs were found in an emaciated condition in a truck drivers yard a court heard yesterday. see more


Farmer is fined 50p for killing tots’ pet dog.

Irish Mirror, 29/4/1999

John O’Connell (63) of Ballymore, Cobh killed Belinda, the children’s dog and Harvey a neighbour’s dog as the sisters aged 5 & 6 screamed in horror.   see more


Farmer guilty of cruelly beating and torturing dog in Dingle.

The Kerryman, 2/7/1999

A Dingle farmer who killed two Labrador dogs because he alleged that they had been savaging his sheep was fined ₤100 in Dingle District Court on Friday.  see more


Driven barking mad by 7 dogs

The Star, 07/06/2000

Dog breeder, Rita Beattie, a director of the Irish Kennel Club has been warned that she may have to reduce the number of dogs she keeps if their barking continues to cause a nuisance. She was taken to court by her neighbour who claimed there was constant noise by the barking dogs. Ms. Beattie keeps four Bichon Frise toy poodles, a boxer, a Yorkshire terrier and a Papillon in her home at Castlewood Park, Rathmines, Dublin. Ms Beattie is a former chairperson of the IKCs education committee, which teaches members how to minimise inconvenience to neighbours. Judge James McDonnell granted an order forcing her to abate the barking nuisance or he would enforce a limit on the number of dogs she can keep.



Sick punters lay bets on cat fighting.

Sunday People, 11/06/2000.
Sick gamblers behind outrageous animal fights in Ireland have sunk to a new low - using CATS. At least one group of illegal dog fight organisers recently provided twisted punters with a bloody sideshow: cats being ripped to shreds by vicious dogs. A source who witnessed the sickening blood-bath in Co. Antrim said as many as a DOZEN terrified cats died horrible deaths after being released into pens with enraged Lurchers. The cats were thrown into large pens which had wire mesh over the top, so punters could watch, but the cats couldn't escape," said one punter. "It was wholesale slaughter. I would bet on dog fighting, but this was sick. Those cats didn't have a chance." According to the source, any cats not killed outright had their necks broken by 'pit attendants'.

 


ISPCA probes own staff over cruelty

News of the World, 26/11/2000

The ISPCA launched a major investigation into claims that pets have been starved, neglected and cruelly put to death at one of its own animal sanctuaries.  see more



Priest gives kennels a pounding.

Sunday People, 07/01/2001

A parish priest announced that the ISPCA was to be booted out of a dog shelter for neglecting dogs in its care.  see more



ISPCA gets dogs abuse over pound

Evening Herald, 08/02/2001

A Wicklow priest called for a public investigation into the operation of the counties dog pound. Fr. Campbell chairman of the Wicklow SPCA told a packed meeting in Ashford that the ISPCA needed to be taken apart from top to bottom. The meeting was held in the wake of an incident over Christmas when members of the WSPCA broke into the pound, which is run by the ISPCA and rescued two dogs. David Coulson told the angry meeting that the ISPCAs record in running dog pounds had been appalling. He claimed that unwanted dogs had been electrocuted since 1975 in Cork and that in Louth they had been shot until mid 1999 and that dogs from Leitrim had been sent to a rendering plant in Longford and eventually fed to pigs and chickens. However, since the BSE scare unwanted dogs now went to a rendering plant in Cavan, he said.



Man left dog to starve in garden

Irish Star, 26/04/2002

(Main parts of the article)

 David Hendrick (40) of 9 Cherry Orchard Parade, Ballyfermot Dublin 10 was banned from keeping a pet for life after an emaciated dog was found almost starved to death at his home. He was also fined €150 after he pleaded guilty to charges of neglect in Dublin District Court (25/04/02). DSPCA Inspector Robert Kenny told the court he found the starving dog at Hendrick’s home on the 4th March 2002. The dog, two-year-old Rattweiller crossbred was in an “advanced stage of neglect” in the back garden of the defendant’s home. The dog has since recovered from his ordeal.



Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot.

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003.

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the dog beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car. Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70), pleaded with Oliver Byrne (57) from Aghaloughan, near Carrickmacross, not to shoot the dog, which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car, where it was hiding, and discharged his shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs. Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog. Judge Brennan fined him £100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms’ certificate.



Farmer arrested for animal smuggling

Wicklow People, 24/07/2003

The Dunlavin livestock dealer who hit the headlines when he smuggled sheep from a foot and mouth infected herd into the country has been arrested again, on suspicion of animal smuggling. Fifty three year old John Walsh will appear in a Scottish court this Monday on suspicion of importing animals without a permit and animal cruelty. Forty three puppies and three kittens that were in Walsh’s possession at the time have been taken into care at animal welfare centres in Scotland. Walsh is originally from Calverstown but his family moved to Ballyhurtin Dunlavin many years ago. Walsh was jailed in January 2002 by a Dublin court when he was convicted of smuggling almost 300 sheep, some of which were infected with foot and mouth, into Ireland. His Offaly farm was seized this year by CAB in order to pay a tax bill believed to be in the region of €900,000. 



Dog lost eye over owner’s savage beating

Irish Independent, 26/09/2003

A dog was beaten so savagely with a broom handle by its owner that it had to have one eye removed by a vet, a court heard yesterday.  see more


€1,000 fine for neglecting animals

Evening Herald, 9/12/2003

A man pleaded guilty to ill-treating two dogs, one of which had two kilos of matted hair when found by the ISPCA. Joseph Murphy, Killinane, Bagenalstown, Co Carlow, appeared before Bagenalstown District Court in relation to two counts of cruelty on a cocker spaniel and a blind under-weight Shihtzu which was subsequently put down. Murphy was ordered to pay €1,000 to the ISPCA and Judge John Coughlan adjourned the case to January 12th for further sentencing.



104 dogs rescued from puppy farm.

Irish Independent, 29/03/2004

ISPCA Officials removed 104 dogs from a puppy farm that were being kept in “appalling” conditions, many in small, steel boxes with little ventilation. Most of the puppies were Cavalier King Charles and terriers that were being held in ‘absolutely unbelievable’ conditions in the Ballieboro area of Co Cavan, ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes said last night. The kennels were made of steel cladding-type materials with virtually no ventilation, except for two or three holes the size of one euro coins, he said. “The cleaning regime was non-existent”. There was also evidence of cross and in breeding among the dogs. Officials visited the breeder over three days and removed 104 out of 112 dogs on the premises. One terrier was taken from the back of an old van on the property. It had been wired in and kept in excrement that was six or seven weeks old, Mr Hughes said.



Dog Fighting case adjourned

Irish Times, 08/10/2004

The case against 12 men charged with running an illegal dog fight was adjourned at Nass District Court yesterday. Solicitor Mr.Eoin O'Connor, who is representing some of the defendants, said he needed more time to get legal advice considering the number of clients and the amount of evidence involved. Judge Murrough Connellan adjourned the case to November 17th. The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st 2003, at Broclagh, Roberstown, Co.Kildare. The men have all been charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911. The defendants are: Mr.Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle Co.Meath, Mr.Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown Carlow, Mr.Troy Jordan, River Road, Allenwood Co.Kildare, Mr.James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co.Kildare, Mr.Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road Carlow, Mr.Paul Malone, Dunmore Lawn, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.Karl Bree, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin, Co.Dublin, Mr.John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templogue, Co.Dublin, Mr.Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimagh, Co.Dublin, Mr.Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham,Co.Dublin



Thugs mutilate family pet and leave it to die in ‘horrendous’ attack

Irish Examiner, 15/09/2005
A family pet which was saved from drowning was butchered with an axe or a grinder by thugs who then threw the dog up on a pillar outside a housing estate and left it to die.  see more


Dogs poisoned and dumped in car-park

The Nationalist, 01/10/2001
Two dogs were found poisoned at the entrance to the Brownshill Dolmen last week, even though their concerned owner was out searching desperately for them. Carlow ISPCA inspector Jean Bird is awaiting a full autopsy report on the bodies of the animals. However, preliminary results indicate that the dogs were poisoned. “There isn’t a question that they were hit by a car or anything,” explained Jean, who was called to the car park of the Brownshill Dolmen by members of the public appalled by the sight. “We’re still waiting the full lab result but a vet carried out preliminary tests which indicated they were poisoned. “We’ll now be fully investigating the matter. The owner of the dog is away on holiday and the dogs were being cared for by his father,” Jean explained. “The father works during the day so the dogs were kept on long chains in his back garden,” she added. It is understood that the dogs were lying, stretched out at the edge of a nearby car-park. There was no attempt made to bury the dogs and at this stage it is not known if the animals were dumped while alive or following their death. When contacted by The Nationalist the owner’s father explained how he had made several enquires as to the whereabouts of the dogs, who had broken from their chains at his home on Monday evening.



Baiters abandon mauled dogs - Interrupted by locals, owners flee from farmland in Muckalee

Kilkenny Voice, 14/3/2006

Bloodthirsty dog owners scampered and left their animals behind them when they were chased from farmland in Muckalee in North Kilkenny.  see more


Waterford News/Star, 26/05/2000

(main points)

Michael Cashin (34) 76 Connolly Place, Waterford was found guilty of cruelty to a German shepherd dog at Waterford District Court. The court was told that the dog lost 201lbs in weight and that it was in poor condition with his backbone and ribs protruding. It was reported that Mr. Cashin has an alcohol problem. The judge imposed a baring order on Mr. Cashin for keeping a dog until such time he could satisfy a court of law that he was not abusing alcohol and was capable of looking after himself and therefore capable of looking after a dog.



Drunken Farmer cruelly beat, tortured wife
s dog.

Irish Independent, 10/12/1999

A drunken farmer that beat his wife’s dog so badly that it had to be put down was told to continue attending an alcohol treatment course when he appeared before a court in Galway yesterday. Michael Creaven, 40, Tumnahulla, Corrandulla, Co. Galway pleaded guilty to cruelly beating and torturing the black and white collie outside his estranged wife’s house. His wife got a safety order against him in 1996.He was accused of breaching the order while beating the dog, he put his wife Mary in fear of such violence being used against her.



Ordered not to keep animals

Tipperary Star, 27/03/2004

A dog housed in ‘horrific conditions’ was said by Judge O’Neill at Thurles District court to have been ‘literally skin and bone’. The judge made his comment after looking at photographic evidence of the dog found on the premises of Francis Maguire at 43 Butler Avenue, Thurles. Maguire was prosecuted that he did ill-treat the dog and her litter of pups. A witness said the dog was malnourished and thin with her stomach in a sunken state. The judge imposed a fine of €150 and ordered the defendant not have custody of an animal again.



Pets mutilated on railway tracks

The Star, 13/06/2003
A town has been left shocked after a series of savage attacks on cats and dogs. Two cats were found battered to death in gardens close to railway lines running through Carrick-on-Suir Co.Waterford. Three mutilated dogs were discovered on the tracks and owners of a missing dog and cat in the area fear the worst.

  Gardai questioned a number of youths in relation to the attacks on the cats. "The two cats found in gardens were badly beaten. They were kicked to death and stood on," said a garda spokesman. A woman who springer spaniel, Prince, was found mutilated on the railway tracks, said he had been a family pet for eight years. "He just wandered off one day and we never saw him again," she said. "We heard a vet found Prince and another dogs on the railway tracks." We have heard reports of dogs being thrown off the bridges or tied to the tracks."

  Local vet Gerry Clancy saw two dogs on the railway tracks. "The springer spaniel was chopped to bits". It was alive but in flitters and we had to put it down on the sport." he said. SPCA spokeswoman Angela Anthony has warned pet owners in the area to be extra vigilant.


  
Horror of pups nailed to door 'Slaughtered for yapping'
Irish Sun, 27/04/2006

Two yapping puppies were bludgeoned to death – then NAILED to a door.
Horrified gardai and ISPCA chiefs wee last night investigating claims that the killer was the dog's owner. He allegedly slaughtered the cute pair with a lump hammer.  see more


Dog’s leg amputated DIY style – ‘horrific cruelty’
Tipperary Star, 03/05/2007

A springer spaniel dog that was found wandering in a garden in Cashel last weekend with one of its front legs amputated "DIY style" is to be operated on today (Thursday) in an attempt to relieve its suffering.  see more



Dog’s neck slashed in appalling act of cruelty

Attack: DSPCA seek owner

Evening Herald, 29/5/2007

This little black terrier was fortunate to be alive today after its neck was slashed in an appalling act of cruelty.  see more



Ballyglunin farmer banned from keeping animals after cruelty conviction

Tuam Herald, 29/10/2009

Animal cruelty organisation welcomes judge's verdict  see more



Six month suspended sentence in animal cruelty case

Leinster Express, 22/12/2008

A woman who claimed to rescue dogs has been given a six month suspended jail sentence after her appeal against a conviction for animal cruelty failed.  see more



Husband tortured and killed dog

BBC News (online), 18/7/2008

A man who killed his wife's dog and threatened to kill her has been sentenced to six months in jail.  see more



Young puppy kicked to death by Donegal kids

IrishDigest.com, 8/1/2011

THREE children, one as young as five, laughed and cheered as they kicked a puppy to death in a Letterkenny ousing estate, the Irish Independent newspaper reports in a shocking and terrible story this morning, which first came to light yesterday on a local radio station.  see more


Irish Independent

MSN NEWS (http://www.news.msn.ie/puppy-throat-slashed-742050-Jan2013/), 05/01/2013

A THREE MONTH OLD lurcher puppy had its throat slashed in a horrific attack in Portlaoise, Co Laois yesterday afternoon.  see more



Dog lured to its death by University of Limerick students in drunken game

Limerick Leader, 2/6/2013

 DRUNK UL students lured a dog to its death in a sick game, says a local resident.  see more


They've had a ruff time! Adorable puppies bred on illegal dog farm found stuffed into car boot bound for Britain (but don't worry, the poor things are alright now)
  • Police in Ireland seized around 50 of the dogs in the back of two cars in Dublin
  • Many have had their tails docked and claws removed
  • The dogs include around 25 Jack Russells, cocker and springer spaniels, and terrier, beagle and Labrador breeds
  • Several are in special care because they were too young when taken away from their mother

Daily Mail, 11/10/2012

see more


Belfast Telegraph, 28/08/ 2013

see more



Ballydangan pups have lucky brush with the law!
Westmeath Independent, 02/09/2013
Two collie pups had a lucky brush with the law in Ballydangan recently when local Gardai came to their rescue. Gda Alma Delaney and Gda John Duggan responded to a call from a member of the public, who had heard the sound of pups crying coming from a fertilizer bag thrown in a drain in Ballydangan. The concerned individual had tried to help but could not reach the bag. Gardaí were able to retrieve the bag and found the two pups tied inside.  They very kindly brought them back to the station where they were given a bath, food and a warm bed in a cell for the night. The Gardaí then contacted the ISPCA for assistance and the pups were brought to the National Animal Centre. When fully recovered from their ordeal they will be available for
rehoming.
  Inspector Karen Lyons who collected the puppies from the Garda Station commented “The pups are approximately 3 months old, they are very friendly and seem to be well socialised. I find it impossible to understand why anyone could do such a thing to these 2 beautiful pup when there are options out there for people”.


The Journal.ie, 08/07/2011 
A man appears in court after allegedly ordering his Alsatian dog to have sex with a woman who died as a result. A MAN HAS appeared before Limerick District Court charged with ordering his Alsatian dog to have sex with a 43-year-old mother of four, who died from an adverse allergic reaction to the intercourse. The Irish Sun reports that Sean McDonnell, 57, is charged with buggery contrary to Section 61 of the Offences against the Person Act of 1861 – and is believed to be the first person in Ireland to be charged under the legislation. The Irish Daily Star adds that McDonnell and the deceased woman had discussed the arrangement on a bestiality internet chat room, and that Gardaí are satisfied that the intercourse was consensual. The Alsatian dog has been kept in quarantine ever since the incident of 7 October, 2008, Patrick O’Connell wrote.

  The woman fell ill at around 7:30pm that evening and was rushed to Mid-Western Regional Hospital where she died at around 8pm. Tests showed she had died of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction similar to that prompted by peanut allergies. The Sun’s Barry Moran said McDonnell could face a life sentence in prison if found guilty.



Warning: Graphic content - Athlone SPCA appeals for witnesses after dog's head blown off

Independent.ie, 02/12/2013

Athlone SPCA has appealed for information following the discovery of a dog which was shot in the head in the town.  see more



Athlone SPCA says dogs dumped weekly on motorway

Shannonside FM, 02/12/2013

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Athlone says that animals are being dumped on a daily basis in the area. The group has made an appeal for witnesses after a husky dog was shot 4 times over the weekend. The dead animal was discovered by a passer-by on the road in the popular Glynwood Bog area on Sunday afternoon.

  Chairperson of the SPCA Billy Gallagher says the incident has been handed over to the Gardai but they fear that the animal was dumped after failed attempts to sell the dog. Mr. Gallagher says that while this case is extreme people are dumping animals along the motorway on a weekly basis: Billy Gallagher is appealing for people to contact the Gardai if they have further information.  He’s reminding people that it is an offence to abandon and of course shoot an animal except in some circumstances where farmers are permitted to do so.



Young puppy kicked to death by Donegal kids

IrishDigest.com, 08/01/2013

THREE children, one as young as five, laughed and cheered as they kicked a puppy to death in a Letterkenny housing estate, the Irish Independent newspaper reports in a shocking and terrible story this morning, which first came to light yesterday on a local radio station.  see more



Young puppy kicked to death by Donegal kids

IrishDigest.com, 08/01/2013

THREE children, one as young as five, laughed and cheered as they kicked a puppy to death in a Letterkenny housing estate, the Irish Independent newspaper reports in a shocking and terrible story this morning, which first came to light yesterday on a local radio station.  see more



Publican fired shots at hounds on his land

Irish Examiner, 07/01/2012

A PUBLICAN at breaking point took the law into his own hands when foxhounds from a harriers club strayed onto his land in Co Cork and he fired at the dogs. Detective Garda Pat Condon said the club was not hunting on the land but that their pack of over 30 hounds strayed on to it. Fifteen of the dogs were injured, while four others were never found and it was assumed they were shot and died. Michael O’Connell, aged 51, of Ardnaleac, Ballingully, Co Cork, pleaded guilty at Cork District Court yesterday to charges of cruelty to animals by wounding of dogs by shooting with an air rifle loaded with .22 calibre lead pellets. He also pleaded guilty to a related charge of unlawfully and maliciously wounding dogs. 

  Defence solicitor Frank Buttimer said O’Connell had complained numerous times about dogs coming on to his lands prior to the incident on February 22, 2009, and that he reached breaking point when he saw the foxhounds that day. Mr Buttimer described it as a most beautiful location in terms of flora and fauna and that the defendant was trying to let it develop as a safe habitat for badgers and other wildlife. The rural lands overlook the EMC property in the Ovens area. 

  “He had problems with the ingress of dogs and the amount of destruction they caused. It was probably at breaking point. The charges are confined to wounding and causing damage to animals. Other serious stuff is not levelled against him. His purpose was not to injure the dogs but to protect the habitat,” said Mr Buttime.

  Judge Leo Malone said he would dismiss the charges under the Probation Act on payment of €2,000 to Marymount Hospice and the vet’s expenses for appearing in court yesterday for what was listed as a trial before O’Connell’s plea of guilty. The judge complimented Waterfall Harrier Club for indicating it would pay its own veterinary costs and forego witness expenses.



Pensioner’s bid to save dog ignored as pet shot

Irish Independent, 29/01/2003

An enraged farmer chased a dog – which he had already wounded – from his field into a neighbour’s yard and then shot the injured animal dead beside an elderly lady who was sitting at the back of her car.

Judge Flann Brennan was told at Carrickmacross District Court (28/01/03) that pensioner Kathleen Marron (70) pleaded with Oliver Byrne (37) from Aghaloughan near Carrickmacross not to shoot the dog which belonged to neighbours. Byrne however dragged the injured animal from underneath the car where it was hiding and discharged the shotgun at close range into the dog’s head, beside the woman’s legs.

Byrne pleaded guilty to a charge of recklessly discharging the firearm. Garda Inspector Jim Marks said Byrne had admitted shooting the dog.

Judge Brenann fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate.



Irish Examiner, 29/01/2003

A farmer who chased a dog he had already wounded with a gunshot into a neighbour’s yard and then shot it dead in front of an elderly woman, a court heard yesterday. Judge Flann Brennan was told pensioner Katheleen Marron, aged 70, who was sitting in a car under which the dog was hiding, pleaded with Oliver Byrne, aged 57, from Aghloughan near Carrickmacross Co. Monaghan, not to shoot it.

However, he dragged the animal out and shot it in the head. Byrne pleaded guilty through defence lawyer Brendan Lareny at Carrickmacross Disttict Court to a charge of recklessly discharging a firearm at the farmyard killing the dog. The accused solicitor said his client’s livestock were being harassed by dogs and this led him to taking such “drastic action” with his legally held shotgun on the occasion. He since regretted taking such a course of action.

Judge Brennan fined him €100 and bound him to the peace for two years. He also ordered forfeiture of the shotgun and banned him from holding a firearms certificate in the future.



Farmer is fined for the reckless use of shotgun

Irish Examiner, 16/01/1998

A Galway man who blasted in a neighbour’s front door with a shotgun while attempting to shoot a god he believed was worrying his sheep was fined and had his gun confiscated at Athernry Court this week.

Indeed, the dog did not even belong to the owners of the house in which the door was blasted with the shotgun and local Gardai said it was amazing that nobody was injured in the midnight shooting.

Dermot Monaghan, Ivy Mount, Knochaunglass, Athenry, was convicted at the local court this week of reckless discharge of a firearm after he had tracked down a dog he had shot to a neighbour’s door and fired at it.

The Court was not informed as to how the dog fared or if it survived the ordeal but the blast did considerable damage to the door the dog was standing outside and the defendant was ordered to pay £400 compensation to the owner of the damaged house.

Giving evidence Garda Sgt Michael Corry said that at approximately 3.30 am on September 21 last he responded to a call and arrived at the home of James Ruane at Knockaunglass, Athenry.

He saw that the front door of his house was shattered and Mr Ruane handed him five pellets he had found inside. On investigation a large number of pellet marks were found.

He went to tell the Court that the defendant had visited the Ruane household the previous evening to complain about dogs worrying his sheep. At about midnight on the night of the incident the defendant shot and wounded a dog which he believed was worrying his sheep.

He tracked the wounded animal and discharged shots at it.

Emmet Fitzgerald solicitor (defending) said his client was recognised as an up-standing member of the community but he had been having ongoing problems with dogs worrying his sheep and he had lost some sheep because of this in the past. He said this did not excuse his recklessness with a firearm but explained why he felt he had to take action to protect his flock.

Judge Al O’Dea imposed a fine of £500 for the reckless discharge of a firearm and ordered the confiscation of the shotgun and ammunition. He also fined Mr. Monaghan £350 for causing damage to property and ordered to pay £400 in compensation for the damage caused. He was allowed two months to pay or two months in jail in default.

When the defence solicitor asked for a review on the gun confiscation order the Judge said it would be better to leave that matter in the hands of the Garda sergeant.



Farmer is fined for the reckless use of shotgun

Irish Examiner, 16/01/1998

A Galway man who blasted in a neighbour’s front door with a shotgun while attempting to shoot a god he believed was worrying his sheep was fined and had his gun confiscated at Athernry Court this week.

  Indeed, the dog did not even belong to the owners of the house in which the door was blasted with the shotgun and local Gardai said it was amazing that nobody was injured in the midnight shooting.

  Dermot Monaghan, Ivy Mount, Knochaunglass, Athenry, was convicted at the local court this week of reckless discharge of a firearm after he had tracked down a dog he had shot to a neighbour’s door and fired at it.

  The Court was not informed as to how the dog fared or if it survived the ordeal but the blast did considerable damage to the door the dog was standing outside and the defendant was ordered to pay £400 compensation to the owner of the damaged house.

  Giving evidence Garda Sgt Michael Corry said that at approximately 3.30 am on September 21 last he responded to a call and arrived at the home of James Ruane at Knockaunglass, Athenry.

  He saw that the front door of his house was shattered and Mr Ruane handed him five pellets he had found inside. On investigation a large number of pellet marks were found.

  He went to tell the Court that the defendant had visited the Ruane household the previous evening to complain about dogs worrying his sheep. At about midnight on the night of the incident the defendant shot and wounded a dog which he believed was worrying his sheep.

  He tracked the wounded animal and discharged shots at it.

  Emmet Fitzgerald solicitor (defending) said his client was recognised as an up-standing member of the community but he had been having ongoing problems with dogs worrying his sheep and he had lost some sheep because of this in the past. He said this did not excuse his recklessness with a firearm but explained why he felt he had to take action to protect his flock.

  Judge Al O’Dea imposed a fine of £500 for the reckless discharge of a firearm and ordered the confiscation of the shotgun and ammunition. He also fined Mr. Monaghan £350 for causing damage to property and ordered to pay £400 in compensation for the damage caused. He was allowed two months to pay or two months in jail in default.

  When the defence solicitor asked for a review on the gun confiscation order the Judge said it would be better to leave that matter in the hands of the Garda sergeant.



Boy kills dog in horrific attack

Disgust as pup beaten with sticks

Belfast Telegraphy, 12/07/2005

There was outrage last night over another horrifying case of animal cruelty in Ulster in which a young boy is believed to have beaten a puppy to death.

  Police and the USPCA were called to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of the puppy, which was found with severe injuries in the Vianstown Road area of Downpatrick.

  Sinn Fein councillor Eamonn McConvey said the boy’s parents were “very upset” by what had happened.

  He said: “This is a very concerning incident. We don’t know the full circumstances yet but the parents of the boy who has been implicated in this incident are very upset.

  “They are devastated and can’t understand why their son would do this.

  “They are very sorry for all the hurt caused.”

One resident said a group of children who witnessed the incident were left badly shaken.

  He said: “There were a number of kids about and they were left pretty shaken by what they had seen. Nobody knows yet what was behind this. We think the dog was a stray.”

  The boy is believed to have swung the dog around by its legs.

  This is the latest in a series of animal cruelty cases in the province in recent weeks.

  Earlier this month two children were believed to be responsible for beating a baby goat to death in Co Tyrone.

  The young animal was found with its legs and back broken in Dromore after it was beaten with a hurling stick.

  The children were too young to face prosecution.

  Two weeks ago a Labrador cross-breed was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of a block of flats in north Belfast.

  Police were also called in to investigate the possible decapitation of a sheep after an animal’s head was discovered at a house in south Belfast.



Sick punters lay bets on cat fighting

Sunday People, 11/06/2000

Sick gamblers behind outrageous animal fights in Ireland have sunk to a new low – using CATS. At least one group of illegal dog fight organisers recently provided twisted punters with a bloody sideshow: cats being ripped to shred by vicious dogs. A source who witnessed the sickening blood-bath in Co. Antrim said as many as a DOZEN terrified cats died horrible deaths after being released into pens with enraged Lurchers – a breed of dog more traditionally associated with racing and rabbit hunting. The events are taking place on both sides of the border.

  “The cats were thrown into large pens which had wire mesh over the top, so punters could watch, but the cats couldn’t escape,“ said one punter. “It was wholesale slaughter. I would bet on dog fighting, but this was sick. Those cats didn’t have a chance.”

  According to the source, any cats not killed outright had their necks broken by ‘pit attendants.’ He said fellow punters told him afterwards that some of the cats had tried to fight back.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

SAVAGE: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart tow blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.

And they spend five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brocklagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.  Five men were found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.

Offence

A jury in Naas district court found another man not guilty.  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondakin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all male jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.

  The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other by the neck,” Garda Steve Kinneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of € 12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Five men found guilty of ill-treating animals by attending dog fight

Irish Independent, 14/07/2005

Five men have been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight, in the first case of its kind in the state.  see more



History made as dog fight swoop lands handler in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.

  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in the history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Dreegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.

 

Man jailed for organising cruel and bloody dogfight

Irish Independent, 29/07/2005

A 35-year-old man has been jailed for 18 months for cruelty to animals during a dogfight in the first case of its kind in the State.

  Another four men were given suspended sentences and fined at Naas circuit court yesterday after being found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals in 2003.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, was jailed for 18 months by Judge Pat McCartan yesterday. It also emerged that he had previously been convicted and fined €6,475 for cruelty to six pitbull terriers found in neglect at his home.

  Yesterday’s sentencing was welcomed by the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) who said that the practice "is not acceptable in this day and age."

  The trial had heard that a team of gardai and inspectors from the ISPCA had raided a Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody clinch in a corrugated steel pen. The two pitbull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. Such was the ferocity of the fight between the dogs that a ladder was needed to separate them.

  Yesterday, Judge McCartan said it was a “mean and nasty offence where the animals were used for a purpose never designed”. The five men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals.

  All had pleaded not guilty to the charges. It is the first time that such a case has been heard in the State.

  Each of the men faced a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years imprisonment. Judge McCartan said he was “fairly certain” that but for the intervention of the Gardai, one or both of the dogs would have died in tht fight.

  There was also significant organisation in putting together the event by building the ring that was found and putting down a carpet so the dogs would have a better grip, he said.

  While Jordan now faces jail, Richard Somerville from Navan Road, Cabra, Dublin was ordered to pay €3,000 to the ISPCA and his sentence would be suspended.

Karl Breen of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin, Dublin received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the ISCPCA, while Thomas Codd of Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght had to pay €500 to have his none-month sentence suspended.

  David Deegan of Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght received an 18-month sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the animal welfare body.



Police seize fighting dogs after ‘training camp’ raid

Irish Independent, 07/01/2006

Around 60 dogs were last night seized by animal welfare and police officers as they raided a suspected training camp for fighting dogs.

  Pit bull terriers were among the dogs recovered during the operation in Co Down, about a mile from a puppy farm which was raided on Thursday night in Katesbridge.

  The Ulster Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA) and police recovered around 100 dogs during Thursday’s raid.

  The puppies were rescued from appalling conditions during a six-hour overnight operation. The original raid was sparked when boxer dogs were spotted feeding from the carcass of a cow.

  It is understood equipment used to train fighting dogs was also discovered in yesterday’s operation.

  A USPCA spokesperson said yesterday’s find was significant. “There appears to be a lot more pit bull terriers around these days,” he said. “They have been used for dog fighting.

  “The operation is continuing and it is likely there could be more discoveries.”

Vets were called in to examine the puppies recovered from Thursday night’s operation on a farm building at Katesbridge.

  The puppies have been sent to various locations across Northern Ireland and also included Jack Russells and other dogs.


Tougher laws

The find has prompted politicians to demand tougher laws, including criminal convictions, for cases of animal cruelty.

  Meanwhile, Limerick Animal Welfare organisation has launched an urgent appeal for homes for more than a dozen Christmas puppies abandoned in just under a week.  At least 12 dogs have been found abandoned in various parts of the city and county since last Friday and foster homes or permanent homes are being urgently sought.

  One pup recovered two days ago is just 10 months old and was picked up after he was knocked down while wandering the streets.

  Anyone who can offer a home to one of the abandoned Christmas puppies can contact Limerick Animal Welfare at 087 6371044 or 061 336740.



ISPCA probes suspicious beheading of dog on railway track

Irish Independent, 08/01/2005

Gardai in Athlone and the ISPCA are investigating an incident in which a dog may have been tied to railway tracks by a group of youths and had its head severed by an oncoming train.

  Local ISPCA inspector Paul McCormack said they were investigating two sinister incidents which may be connected.

  The first was before Christmas when a local butcher overheard two 13-year-old boys discussing taking a stray dog from the town and tying tit to railway tracks to see what would happen.

  The butcher talked the boys out of their plan. A local woman contacted the ISPCA and the stray was picked up.

  On January 1, a rare Pyrenean Mountain Dog owned by a local went missing and was found beheaded on railway tracks. “We don’t know if the events are connected but it seems too much of a coincidence,” said Mr McCormack.

  The dog’s instinct would have been to run so it was unlikely it would have come near the train unless held there, he said. The area where the dog was found was fenced off, so it would have had to walk over a mile along tracks.

  Mick McDonnell, the dog’s owner, said he was devastated. He had thought that his dog strayed and was killed accidentally by a train, but now he believes otherwise. His two-year-old dog, Snorri, was a fixture on a Viking Tour boat he runs, taking tourists on trips of Lough Ree each year.

  A spokesman for the gardai in Athlone said they were investigating the incident. Mr Cormack appealed for anyone with information to come forward.



110 dogs rescued in farm seizure

The star, 23/01/2004  

Gardai and ISPCA inspectors removed 110 Dachshund dogs from a puppy farm yesterday because of poor conditions.

  Twenty-one of the dogs were found in dark and cold conditions in boxes in an old North Tipperary cottage, while 17 puppies were found in cases in an old van.

  Seventy-two other dogs were kept in an open yard in pens.

  The discovery came after the ISPCA received a number of complaints about the North Tipperary puppy farm on their national telephone contact line.


Farm

ISPCA inspectors visited the farm on Wednesday afternoon and discovered that animals there were being kept in inadequate conditions.

  Yesterday, four ISPCA inspectors – accompanied by gardai – visited the farm and discovered the 100 dogs living in cramped conditions without access to fresh bedding, water or food.

  The owner of the farm agreed to let the ISPCA remove the animals from the premises.

  Mr Mark Beazley, the ISPCA inspector leading the investigation, said the dogs were of a pedigree breed.

  The pedigree Dachshunds – more commonly known as sausage dogs – can see for €200 per pup.

  On average the ISPCA raid one to two puppy farms each month throughout the country.

  These farms can house between 10 and 500 animals

  “Puppy farming is not illegal, but certain conditions need to be adhered to.

  “A farm can become illegal if the living conditions are not up to standard,” said Mr Beazley.

  “In a puppy farm we would want well ventilated areas with access for the dogs to heat, shelter, food and bedding.”



Dog killer stalks northside estate

North People, 02/06/2004

A person who is attempting to kill dogs by dropping poison in back gardens of an Artane housing estate could be endangering the lives of children, it was feared this week.

  Ann McDonnell, a resident on Ardbeg Drive, contacted The Northside People expressing deep concern after her dog, ‘Fifi’ died from “deliberate” poisoning.   She claimed that it was the second attempt to kill her dog in this cold-hearted manner.

  Her neighbour Shay Kenny told this newspaper that four attempts have been made over the last 18 months to poison his collie ‘Lady’.

  Also it’s understood that a dog belonging to another woman in the area died after being poisoned.

  Residents believe that the poison is being thrown into back gardens from a lane to the rear of the houses. Sometimes the poison is disguised in cakes while on one occasion it was concealed in an opened envelope.

  Residents fear that a child playing in a back garden might pick up the poison meant for dogs and innocently eat it. Coolock gardai have been alerted to the spate of incidents troubling the neighbourhood.



Security chief fined £500 for dog cruelty

Irish Independent, 03/10/1997

An award winning dog owner was fined £500 and banned from using the animals for commercial security after a court heard how he kept a Cerman Shepherd in a filthy burnt-out building without proper food or water.

  Security firm owner Paul Bracken, of Avondale, Leixlip, Co Kildare, was convicted of cruelly treating a 13-year-old bitch named Cresta. A further charge of cruelly ill-treating a five-year-old make called Prince was dismissed.

  Dublin District Court heard the animals were found guarding the burnt-out nightclub section of the Embankment pub in Tallaght on October 16 last by DSPCA inspector Robert Kenny.

  The DSPCA claimed Cresta was grossly undernourished, sleeping on urine and faeces soaked carpet and Prince was slightly undernourished and kept in a diesel soaked boilerhouse.

  Judge Desmond Hogan said he accepted the prosecution evidence.

  Mr Bracken told the court the dogs were fed every day by himself or one of the security guards he employed on the premises. He said the dogs were there to keel “the lads company”.

  “I have had German Shepherds all my life and I am madly in love with them. I have showed them and trained them,” he said.

Judge Hogan said he accepted Embankment manager Mark Fay’s evidence that there had not been proper feeding.

  He ordered that Cresta, who has since regainedfull health, should remain in a foster home and that Prince should stay with Mr Bracken providing he was only used as a family pet.



Dog had to have eye removed after beating

Irish times, 26/09/2003

A District Court yesterday heard how a dog had to have her right eye removed following a beating by her former owner.

  Michael Gaughran (49), of Woodtwon, Drumconrath, Co Meath, admitted the cruelty to animals offence at Woodtwon on February 19th this year when he appeared before Ardee District Court yesterday.

  Garda Barry Crudden said he went to Woodtwon on that date after an inspector with the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals contacted him to say he had received a report of a dog being beaten.

  At Woodtown, the garda spoke to tow men, who said they had witnessed Gaughran beat the dog with a broom handle. He saw the dog cowering in the corner, and spoke to Gaughran, who said the dog had attacked a goose and he had hit her “a couple of taps of a stick”.

  The garda seized the dog under the Protection of Animals Act, and handed her over to the ISPCA inspector, Mr Conor Dowling.

  Solicitor Mr Richard McDonnel said the dog had cuts to the eye and was otherwise well fed. It had also attacked and killed a lamb a year before.

  In reply to Judge Flann Brennan, the garda said the dog’s eye had t be removed following the incident.

  Mr McDonnel said the dog had a defective eye anyway, but did not know if it was the same eye that was removed.

  Veterinary inspector Mr Finbar Heslin told the court he examined the dog, and said both eyes were affected by blunt trauma.

  The left eye had sever haemorrhaging, the cornea was lacerated and the top of the counea surface had been removed. There was internal damage to the right eye and evidence of previous trauma. The reason it (right eye) was removed “was the result of damage inflicted just previous”.

  Gaughran’s solicitor said his client has a debilitating illness and was on disability income of just €124 a week. He added that the ISPCA was not seeking to have him prevented from keeping animals.

  Judge Brennan convicted Gaughran, and imposed a fine of €200.

  After the court case, the ISPCA inspector said the damage to the dog’s eye was not immediately known as the white of the eye, the so-called third eyelid, had been covering it.



Dogs in cruelty case costing £45,000 to kennel

Irish Independent, 18/11/2000

The kennelling of 26 dogs belonging to a woman convicted of cruelty to the animals, has so far cost more than £45,000, the High Court was told yesterday.

  Donna Sfar, St Bronagh’s Lisdoo, Dundalk, Co Louth successfully challenged part of a Circuit Court order which disqualified her from “owning” a dog for 10 years, whereas the legislation empowers a judge to prohibit a person “keeping” a dog. Ms Sfar was convicted in May, 1999 in Dundalk District Court of cruelty to her 26 dogs. She was fined £300 and disqualified from “owning” a dog for five years. She appealed to the Circuit Court which affirmed the order but increased the disqualification to 10 years. Yesterday, Ms Sfar’s counsel, Feichin McDonagh SC, said that to date the kennelling of the dogs had cost £44,900, of which his clients had paid £19,400, leaving over £25,000 outstanding.

  Quashing the part of the Circuit Court order which disqualified Ms Sfar from “owning” a dog for 10 years, Mr Justice Kearns said that he thought the proceedings could have been brought to court a long time before yesterday. The judge said it appeared that the original mistake disqualifying Ms Sfar from “owning” dogs had been made in the District Court order.



Facing up to cruelty to animals.

No more ‘blind eye’ justice as two gets jail

Evening Herald, 13/04/1999

These are the pictures of wanton cruelty which will put two men behind bars for 30 days. A German shepherd lying in its own excrement, dehydrated, unable to stand and a pit bull terrier, a quarter its normal weight, shocked and dying.  see more



Jail for men who starved and ill-treated their dogs

Irish Independent, 13/04/1999

  Two Dublin men have been sentenced to 30 days imprisonment and banned from keeping dogs as pets for 10 years in two separate cases which a judge yesterday described as appalling cruelty.

  Both cases were taken at Dublin District Court by the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and involved a German shepherd and a pitbull terrier. Each animal was in such an appalling condition it tad to be destroyed by a vet.

  In the first case, Thomas Conwasy of Ashowood Drive, Clondalkin, Dublin 22,failed to appear in court to answer charges relating to cruelly ill-treating and causing unnecessary suffering to a German shepherd.

  A DSPCA inspector said she called to examine the dog following complaints about its condition.

  The dog, which had a serious leg injury, was lying in its own excrement in a garden and was too weak to stand.

  After hearing the animal weight only 20kgs instead of the 33kgs it should have, Judge James McDonnell described the case as “cruel and unnecessary” and said it obviously stemmed from neglect over a substantial period.

  In the second case, the court heard that William Murphy, of Stanaway Road, Dublin 12 had told an inspector that he did not have a pit bull terrier.

  However, on checking the back garden, the animal was found there, chained up. it was emaciated and very dehydrated and was so weak it had to be carried to the DSPCA van.

  A vet who examined the dog described it as one of the worst cases of ill-treatment he had ever come across. Murphy also failed to appear in court.

Costs of £250 were awarded to the charity in each case.



Recluse had 108 dogs in bungalow

Irish Times, 10/12/2004

An elderly recluse who had 108 dogs seized from his home because they were malnourished and neglected was allowed to keep one of the animals at Cork Circuit Court yesterday.

  Veterinary officials found John O’Sullivan to be in possession of 108 dogs at his three-bedroom bungalow in Lus na Meala, Banduff, Co Cork, two weeks ago.   The dogs were seized by Cork County Council following a court order. Most of them had to be put down.



Ordered not to keep animals

Tipperary Star, 27/03/2004

A dog housed in what was described as “horrific conditions” was said by Judge O’Neil, in a case at Thurles District Court, to have been “literally skin and bone.”

  Judge O’Neil made his comment after looking at photographic evidence of the condition of the dog found on the property of Francis Maguire, 43 Butler Avenue, Thurles. Maguire was prosecuted that he did cruelly ill-treat the dog and her litter of pups.

  Hannah Fitzgerald, Tipperary Friends of Animals Society, said she went to 44 Butler Avenue having received a report from a concerned member of the public.   She observed the dog run away and her litter of pups were being kept in “bad conditions.” Gardai who accompanied witness later located the dog near Stakelums premises.

  Witness said the dog was “malnourished and thin, with her stomach in a sunken state.” Witness said the animal was underweight and had to be put on a special diet. The dog had been housed in “horrific conditions.” Ms Fitzgerald submitted a photograph of the dog in its condition at that time.

  In reply to Mr Brian Hughes, solicitor for defendant, witness said the bitch was feeding the pups.

  Mr Hughes – If the bitch’s health was not good shape she would not have been able to feed the pups.

  Witness – Yes, she was feeding the pups at that time, but, she was getting to the stage where she would not be able to do so.

  Witness agreed with Mr Hughes that the state of the dog was not due to violence having been inflicted on the animal.

  Mr Hughes said that his client had never been in trouble of this nature in the past. He had experienced some problems in his life, alcohol-related problems.   His client accepted that the dog was undernourished.

  Judge O’Neil submitted that the pups were in good health and the mother was feeding them.

  Judge – Notwithstanding her own condition the (dog) did look after the pups.

Judge O’Neil said he would have to convict defendant on the basis of the evidence before him. However, he would be as lenient as possible taking into account what Mr Hughes had stated about defendant.

  The Judge imposed a fined of €150 and ordered that defendant should hot have custody of or keep animals in the future.



Pet owner who just didn’t give a shih tzu

The Star, 13/01/2004

These are the pitiful pups found by animal workers in the “worst case of neglect” the ISPCA has ever seen.

  The cocker spaniel and shih tzu were discovered by ISPCA Inspector Brendan Hughes on the grounds of Joseph Murphy’s house in Killenane, Bagenalstown, Co Carlow last May.

  Murphy (60) was yesterday convicted of two counts of animal cruelty and fined a total of more than €3,000.

  The court was told that Murphy kept both dogs in such bad condition that the barely alive shih tzu had to be destroyed.

  And the cocker spaniel’s coat was so matted with hair that it took animal workers more than three hours to groom the animal.

  The court heard that gardai were called to Murphy’s house by an ISPCA inspector.

  The emaciated shih tzu was in such a bad way the inspector did not know whether it was alive or dead.

  The pooch had gone completely blind due to the amount of hair growing into its eyes, while its paws had become gangrenous from the amount of excrement in the yard, the court heard.

  Judge Donnchadh O’Buachalla fined Murphy €750 and banned him from ever owning or having responsibility for a dog in the future.

  He ordered Murphy to pay €1,000 to the Carlow branch of the ISPCA.


Worst

The judge also ordered Murphy to fork out a further €1,400 to the ISPCA to cover the cost of boarding and grooming the dogs.

  ISPCA chief Alastair Keen yesterday welcomed the ruling – but described Murphy’s as the “worst case of neglect” he’d ever seen.

  “The shih tzu wasn’t even recognisable as a dog when we found it,” Mr Keen told The Star last night.



Heartless and cruel…how can anyone treat dogs like this?

Irish Independent, 21/09/2006

Animal welfare volunteers have described the discovery of two dogs in horrific conditions as an “all-time low” in 20 years of caring for abandoned animals.

  Both dogs are now in the care of Limerick Animal Welfare, and the organisation has appealed for donations to help keep them alive. Spolesperson Niamh Allen said that one of the dogs was in such a bad condition that the organisation was unable to confirm his breed, but believed he might be a poodle.

  The young dog – named Aesop after the writer of c6hildren’s fables about animals – was found wandering on the Cork/Limerick border. He was ravaged by mange, having lost nearly all the hair on his body, and was unable to open his badly infected eyes.

  Ms Allen said it would have taken many painful months of neglect for Aesop to end up in such a state.

  “His face was one of the saddest sights we have ever witnessed. His eyes were full of pain and he had to be the loneliest dog in the world.”

Another dog recently rescued by Limerick Animal Welfare – a lurcher named Lily – was suffering from malnutrition.

  Volunteers believe she was close to death when she was found. She had lost nearly all her hair from mange infection and volunteers believe that she may have given birth to pups recently.

  Ms Allen ha said there was no guarantee that either Lily or Aesop would live and appealed for donations to help look after them.

  It costs approximately €1,000 every day for Limerick Animal Welfare to look after up to 70 dogs and 40 cats that are currently in its care. The rescued animals are boarded in commercial kennels across the midwest region, but the first phase of a long-awaited sanctuary on lands purchased in Kilfinane, Co Limerick, is due to open next month.

  Phase one of the sanctuary is estimated to cost up to €500,000, and Limerick Animal Welfare is seeking donations to meet the shortfall.

  Anyone wishing to make a donation can do so online at www.limerickanimalwelfare.com or at the organisation’s charity shop at 12b Upper Cecil St, Limerick.



Puppy found in pool of blood after brutal hammer attack

Irish Independent, 25/01/2005

Thugs have left an eight-week-old puppy unable to see after smashing her head open with a hammer.

  The vicious attack on the tiny terrier Dana Scully – named after ‘The X-files’ character – took place last week in the Moyross area of Limerick city.

  The little pup was found lying in a pool of blood at a hedge near the sprawling estate by locals.

  “She had blood pouting from her head. We believe she was hit with a hammer. The injuries to her head were very severe and it looked as if she was about to die,” said Marion Fitzgibbon of Limerick Animal Welfare.

The pup underwent surgery to drain fluid from her head at a local veterinary clinic. Veterinary nurse Ciara Walsh, who worked on the puppy, said: “The top of her head was smashed open. This is one of the worst cases of animal abuse I have ever come across.”

  The pup is now in a stable condition, but not yet out of the woods.

  “She cannot see a thing in front of her at all. The swelling still has not gone down so we will have to wait and see,” she said.

The savage attack is the latest in a series carried out in on pets in the city.

  Last month, a greyhound was rescued in the Southill area as young thugs were about to impale it with nails.



Man who hung dog is ‘lunatic’

Sunday World, 26/03//2002

A man has appeared before Gorey District Court for hanging his labrador dog.

  James Boland (47) of Ballinatray Lower, Courtown Harbour, also faces public order offences and criminal damage charges arising from incidents last December.  Superintendent Pat Flynn told Judge Donnchadh O’Buachalla that Boland causes no problems when he’s not drinking but is “like lunatic” when he is. The defendant’s solicitor, David Terrant, said he spoke to a vet who said the killing of the dog was not as cruel as it might appear, and that the dog would have died within 30 seconds.

Superintendent Flynn disagreed, stating there were more humane ways of killing the animal. The judge adjourned the case until November 27, saying it was a very serious.



Owner fined £100 for cruelty to 17 dogs

Irish Times, 22/01/1998

A huntsman and dog-owner was yesterday fined £100 for cruelty to 17 foxhounds in what an animal welfare inspector described as “a most appalling case.”  Christopher O’Sullivan (40) from Shamrock Place, Ringaskiddy, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to cruelty to two dogs but denied he had been cruel to the rest.

  Animal welfare inspector Mr Ted O’Connor of the CSPCA said he found two dogs in a shed and wire compound in a field near O’Sullivan’s home on May 1st last.  One was heavy in pups and they were so bad it was difficult to recognise them as foxhounds.

  “The two dogs were in the most emaciated condition. One could clearly seek the skeletal fame of the dogs through their flesh…the dogs were tearing and scratching.

  “The floor of the compound was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish and old bones and they had no food or water,” Mr O’Connor told a spec6ial sitting of Carrigaline District Court.

Mr O’Connor said he found another 10 hounds in another wire compound attached to a ruined shed. These dogs were also tearing and scratching their bodies.

  “The whole floor area was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish and old bones. The smell…was overpowering. The dogs had no food and the only drink was a half-buc6ket of dirty green water.”

He found another hound in a small car trailer lying in a week’s faeces. There was no sign of food or water in the trailer, he said.

  “It was obvious these animals were suffering over a long period of time, left without food or water and kept in dirty compounds.”

He also found four hounds loose on a roadway. They looked reasonably healthy and this was probably because they weren’t confined to compounds and were able to scavenge for food.

  Garda Declan O’Connor said when he visited the compounds, he found the first two dogs in a wretched condition. “I have never seen a dog alive in such a condition.”

  O’Sullivan explained that he was secretary, huntsman, and kennelman of the Shamrock Harrier Club. He had been involved in the club since he was 10 years old. He had taken in a numb8er of dogs when some elderly members of the club retired or died. He had three dogs himself, but admitted he had overstocked.  The first two dogs had been missing for over six weeks and were dropping from hunger when he found them. He was unable to attend to them properly for a few days because of some shift work he had got with Irish Steel. The other dogs had a hard season and needed the summer to recover.  The dogs were kept in the shed only on three days a week when he fed them meat. He allowed them out into a field for the rest of the week. O’Sullivan claimed. He had given away most of the dogs to two other local harrier clubs and now kept only three himself.

  Solicitor Mr Eugene Murphy said his client “had been striving manfully to keep an ageing club together.” He was a dog-lover for over 30 years and regretted very much what had happened.

Judge Joseph Mangan fined O’Sullivan £100 and ordered him to pay £80 expenses.



Huntsman fined £100 for cruelty to his hounds

Irish Independent, 22/01/1998

A huntsman who starved two dogs until they began tearing at each others bodies was fined £100 yesterday after pleading guilty to cruelty charges.

  Christopher O’Sullivan, Shamrock Place, Ringaskiddy, Co Cork, pleaded guilty at Carrigaline District Court yesterday to cruelty to two dogs on May 1, 1997. He denied cruelty charges to 15 other dogs.

  Animal welfare official, Ted O’Connor, told Judge Joseph Mangan that the harriers were found locked in a derelict shed surrounded by a wire compound.

  The animals were so hungry that they were repeatedly tearing at their own skin and that of their companion.

  “The whole floor area was covered with several inches of faeces as well as rubbish and old bones,” Mr O’Connor told the court.

O’Sullivan told the court that he was secretary and kennelsman of the Shamrock Harriers Club.  He insisted that the dogs were not deliberately mistreated – explaining that they were “knackered” – after the hunting season.

  Judge Mangan convicted O’Sullivan of cruelty to all 17 dogs and fined him £100.



Huntsman fined for cruelty to harriers

Irish Examiner, 22/01/1998

A huntsman and dog lover was yesterday convicted and fined £100 for cruelty to 17 harriers in what an animal welfare inspector described as “a most appalling case.”

  Father of seven, Mr. Christopher O’Sullivan, (40), from 2 Shamrock Place, Ringskiddy, Co Cork pleaded guilty to cruelty to two dogs denying he had been cruel to the rest.

  Animal welfare Inspector Ted O’Connor said he found two of the dogs in a shed and wire compound in a field near O’Sullivan’s home on May 1 last year.

  “The two dogs were in an almost emaciated condition. One could clearly see the skeletal frame of one of the dogs through their flesh…the dogs were tearing and scratching,” he commented.

  “The floor of the compound was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish, and old bones, and they had no food or water,” Mr O’Connor described to a special sitting of Carrigaline District Court.

Mr O’Connor said he found another ten hounds in another wire compound attached to a ruined shed. These dogs were also tearing and scratching their bodies.

  “The whole flood area was covered with several inc6hes of faeces, rubbish and old bones. The smell was overpowering. The dogs had no food and the only drink there was a half bucket of dirty green water,” he said.

Mr O’Connor found another hound in a small car trailer, lying in a week’s accumulation faeces. There was no sign of food or water in the trailer,” he said.

  “It was obvious these animals were suffering over a long period of time, left without food or water and kept in dirty compounds,” he said.

He also found hounds loose on a roadway. They looked reasonably healthy and this was probably due to the fact that they weren’t confined to compounds and were able to scavenge for food.

  Garda Declan O’Connor told the court that when he visited the compounds he found the first two dogs in a wretched condition. “I have never seen a dog alive in such a condition” said Garda O’Connor.

  O’Sullivan explained that he was secretary, huntsman and kennelsman of the Shamrock harrier Club. He had been involved in the club since he was ten years old.  He had taken in a number of dogs when some elderly members of the club retired or died. He had three dogs himself but he had overstocked, he admitted.  The first two dogs had been missing for over six weeks and were dropping from hunger when he finally found them.  He stated that he was unable to attend to the dogs properly for a few days because of some shift work he had got with Irish Steel.

  “The other dogs were after a hard season – they were well knackered after the year – it would take the summer to get them into shape.”

The dogs were only kept in the shed on three days a week when he fed them meat. He allowed them out into a field for the rest of the week, O’Sullivan claimed.  He had given away most of the dogs to two other local harrier clubs and now kept only three himself. He now kept these at kennels at Ballyfeard, he said.

  O’Sullivan’s solicitor Eugene Murphy said his client “had been striving manfully to keep an ageing club together.” He was a dog lover for over 30 years and regretted very much what had happened.

Judge Joseph Mangan fined Mr. O’Sullivan £100 and ordered him to pay £80 expenses for the Animal Welfare Officer, Mr Ted O’Connor.



Satanic slaying

News of the World, 03/09/2006

Dog owners are fearful for their pets after a collie was killed in an apparent satanic ritual.  The dog’s remains, with its throat slit and head crushed, were found on an stone altar inside a spooky stone circle.  A walker made the gruesome discovery in a remote wooded area in Enniskerry earlier this week.  Now Wicklow SPCA are warning folk to keep family pets indoors.

  Noel Campbell of the animal welfare group said: “It seems the dog was bled dry as part of some ritual and then partly burnt.

  “I would urge people to keep an eye on their animals and not let them out unsupervised after dark.”

The authorities have destroyed the altar and the Gardai in Enniskerry are investigating.



Dog savaged by cruel torturers had to lose leg

Evening Herald, 23/05/2006

A three-legged dog – a victim of horrific animal cruelty – is the star of the show in RTE’s Animal Rescue tonight.

  The programme will recount how the DSPCA inspector Robbie Kenny came across boxer Jake who had horrific leg injuries and was severely malnourished.

  After finding Jake in such a painful condition, animal welfare officers discussed whether it was more humane to put him down – but they decided to amputate his leg instead and see if he would adapt.


Sad

And adapt he did as two-year-old Jake is now flourishing in the Ballycullen home of Gillian Duffy, her partner Richard and their 7-year-old daughter Erin.

  Gillian told the Evening Herald she was looking forward to seeing the programme which will feature Jake being found and give a happy ending to such a sad story.

  Tonight’s episode will see Inspector Robbie Kenny find the pup lying on the side of the road, bleeding to death.

  “I only know, from what the inspector told me, is that a girl rang him saying she found a dog lying on the side of the road and he was bleeding to death. She thought he might have been knocked down. But it soon became apparent that there wasn’t an accident.

  “He had been tortured and his leg wound was from someone searing him with a knife or he was caught in some kind of trap,” said Gillian.

  “When we got him, he was so thin. His ribs were protruding and it was awful. They don’t know where he came from but personally I think he was stolen from another family. When we got him, he was already house trained and had such a lovely nature. It was this nature that saved him. I was told they were actually going to put him down but his saving grace was that even when he was in so much pain, and was so badly hurt, he had such a nice temperament,” said Gillian.



Banned from keeping dogs for thirty years

Irish Independent, 29/10/1997

A truck driver who ill-treated eight Great Danes was yesterday given a three month suspended jail sentence and banned from owning dogs for 30 years.

  David Traynor (47) of Newtown Upper, Rathcoole, Co Dublin, was also bound to the peace for two years for what Judge Desmond Windle described as as case of “extreme and deliberate cruelty”.

  Dublin District Court heard last month how DSPCA Inspector Maurice Byrne found the dogs in an emaciated condition among scrap cars in Mr Traynor’s yard on September 16, 1996. They were underweight, some with protruding ribs, suffering from hair loss and had pressure wounds. Four of them had to be put down on humane grounds and the others were found new homes.

  Traynor denied he neglected the dogs and claimed he gave them four to five pounds of meat per day along with dog meal. The conditions of their coats was the result of a recurrent mange problem which he was treating at the time.

  Judge Windle did not accept his evidenc6e and described it as “disgraceful treatment”.

  He ordered Traynor to come up with £1,800 expenses for the DSPCA and adjourned the case for sentencing to today. The court was also told that Traynor had paid over the money in full.

Judge Windle imposed the three month suspended sentence, banned him from keeping dogs for 30 years and bound him to the peace for two years.



Cruelty staff uncover dogs’ Auschwitz at remote country house

Truck driver denies starving Great Danes for four weeks

Irish Independent, 25/09/1997

Eight Great Dane dogs were found in an emaciated condition in a truck driver’s yard, a court heard yesterday.

  Three had to be put down, one died later and the rest were treated and found new homes, Judge Desmond Windle was told.

  Their owner, truck driver David Traynor of Newtown Upper, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin, was convicted of cruelly ill-treating the animals at his home on September 16, 1996. Judge Windle adjourned sentencing to October 28 to allow him come up with £1,800 in costs and veterinary expenses.

  Mr Traynor denied not feeding the dogs, and claimed they were suffering from demodecitic mange which made them look emaciated and neglected.

  DSPCA inspector Maurice Byrne told Dublin District Court that as a result of a call, he and colleague Robert Kenny went to Mr Traynor’s bungalow in the middle of the countryside. There were a number of dogs which appeared to be running wild among scrap cars in the garden of the house. There was an electric fence on the premises to keep the dogs from getting out.

  Mr Traynor initially denied there was anything wrong with the animals, but after closer examination by the inspectors, he agreed to put them into the care of the DSPCA.

  “The dogs had suffered a large amount of hair loss, their ribs and hips were protruding and you could see pressure wounds on their sides.”

When examined at the DSPCA premises by vet Peter McMahon, he found some of the dogs had lost up to half their body weight. One dog had swollen feet and abscesses between its paw digits, another had a painful ulcer on its hip and pressure sores on its knees while a bitch had broken teeth and swollen mammaries.

  Another bitch, which had recently had a litter or else was going through a false pregnancy, had teeth problems and when the vet examined them one of them came out without exerting pressure. Another animal was so emaciated that its eyes had sunken into its head while most of the dogs appeared nervous of human contact.

  Mr McMahon estimated the dogs had not been fed for three to four weeks.

  Mr Traynor told the court he fed the dogs 4lbs to 5lbs of meat every day along with three to four bags of meal. They had previously suffered from demodectic mange and appeared to have contracted it again. He was in the third week of treating them when the DSPCA arrived.

  He denied wilfully neglecting them. “I love my dogs,” said Mr Traynor who has been breeding Great Danes since 1980.

  “In retrospect, I should have brought them to the vet but I was following the pattern that was there before (when they last had mange).”

Convicting him, Judge Windle said it was “disgraceful treatment.” Referring to photos of the dogs produced in court, he said: “I tried to not look because they might inflame me – but from just glimpsing them it would appear to any man there was something substantially wrong with the dogs.”

  Adjourning sentence, he said he was “making no promises” but he wanted to ensure the DSPCA was not out of pocket first before deciding what to do in the case. He ordered the defendant to have £1,800 in court on October 28th to cover vet and court costs.



It’s victory for the News of the World

News of the World, 28/01/2001

The Irish News of the Wold dealt a huge blow against dog fighting this week when two evil Mr Bigs admitted they were involved in the barbaric ‘sport.’

  Tony Mullen, 43, and Jeremy Brown, 41, pleaded guilty to dog fighting charges after being faced with overwhelming evidence. It was gathered during our five-month investigation which began in Dublin and end in justice.

  The probe exposed fighting dog breeders from Finglas to Limerick and a trail which led all the way over the water to England. Our damning dossier has now helped bring five men involved in the sick practice to justice.

  Mullen, of Birmingham – a known fan of Irish-bred pitbulls – admitted two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to his pitbull terrier Cracker, which suffered appalling injuries last March. He also admitted watching an organised fight. Brown, of Chesterfield admitted using a purpose-built pen at his allotment for fighting.

  In our probe, our three-man Dublin based team worked closely with Britain’s RSPCA officials and police officers who raided the pen and found a broken dog’s tooth, and a bloodstained claw and skin.

  Mullen and Brown will be sentenced by Mansfield magistrates next month along with Ryan Nuttall, 21, of Newstead, Notts who earlier admitted eight counts of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and one each for attending and organising a dog fight. Another two men – Nigel Greensmith, 32, of Newstead, and Andrew Taylor, 29, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, Derbys, were fined a total of £550 and ordered to pay £300 costs after admitting watching a fight last April.

  As a result of these convictions, many Irish dogs will be spared the utter humiliation and devastating pain of such evil contests.

  They are the latest in a long line of victories for justice won by Irish News of the World investigators. We have a long tradition of exposing villains. We have helped bring about more than 100 prosecutions of child molesters arms dealers, credit card fraudsters and drug dealers.

  We will continue to hound you out. The Irish News of the World NEVER gives up.



Fifth Dog Poisoned In Enfiled District

Meath Chronicle, 17/01/1998

The death of a three year-old Lewellyn setter dog on New Year’s Day brought the total number of dogs poisoned in the Connellstown/Kilcorney area of Entfield in a three to four-week period to five.

  It was established subsequently, through veterinary examination and x-ray, that the dogs were poisoned with a Gramoxone/Paraquat substance. Users of such products can only purchase them through authorised agents who are obliged to keep a register of such sales. Enquiries are being made through these channels.

  It is understood that the poison was administered through chicken meat, apparently thrown into one or more of the gardens in the area. Samples of the meat have been sent to a laboratory for further testing.

  According to a local resident, whose dog was one of those poisoned “there has not been any trouble caused by dogs in the area, nor have there been any complaints of such to the Gardai or to the residents. Searches in the fields surrounding the community have not indicated any evidence of poison laid down and enquiries among local farmers bear this out.”

I  t is hoped that the ongoing investigations of locals, together with those of Entfield Gardai, will track down the person(s) responsible, so as to prevent even more callous acts.



Victory for ISPCA as court bans man

The Star, 23/01/2005

These are the horrific pictures taken inside a recently discovered puppy farm, revealing the horror of the conditions dogs are forced to love in.

  The woeful state of the two farms, Ballyinan, Co Laois, were described as some of the worst the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals have experienced.

  But thanks to the pioneering work of the ISPCA, both farms were shut down for good earlier this week.

  The owner of the dogs, Liam Burke (66), has been barred from ever owning a dog again.

  The case is the first ever prosecution against a puppy farm owner in this country and the victory is seen as a major coup for the ISPCA.

  ISPCA inspector Conor Dowling revealed that the woeful conditions up to 30 dogs were forced to live in were some of the worst he has ever seen.

  As our exclusive pictures show, dogs ravaged with skin disorders were locked inside makeshift pens with no bedding.

  “The conditions the dogs were being kept in were atrocious and there was no cleaning being done,” Conor said.


Layer

  “There was a thin layer of faeces on the ground and there was a very strong smell of urine, no bedding and old bones lying around.”

Mange, a skin disorder which causes a dog to literally tear of its coat, was rampant in the ramshackle farm.

  “There were a numb8er of dogs that were in poor physical condition and there were a number of dogs with bad skin complaints as well.

  “A lot of the dogs had traces of mange, a lot of them were bald around the eyes. It is a matter of it not being treated and it being allowed to escalate to that stage,” Conor added.

The farm’s owner Liam Burke was well known to ISPCA officials, according to Dowling.

  “He has a bit of history and we have had an involvement before.

  “I believe there were some health factors whic6h perhaps tipped it over the edge but he was always walking a tightrope.”

Last month, Burke, who had previously undergone triple bypass surgery, pleaded guilty to two charges under the 1911 Cruelty to Animals Act/

  The maximum penalty in such a case is a €2,000 fine and/or six months imprisonment.  However, due to the man’s ill health and age, Judge Mary Martin let the dog owner off lightly and ordered him to pay €1,000 for the cost of the investigation, while banning him from owning a dog again.


Outcome

Earlier this week, Carlow District Court hear the Loughglass farm was in an “appalling state” with 10 makeshift pens in a barn reeking of urine.  Inspectors found a nine-week-old puppy with an infected cut at Ballyadams.

  Despite the success of the case the ISPCA has been left with severe financial woes. The cost of housing Burke’s dogs during the court proceedings cost almost €10,000.

  Apart from a small grant from the department of Agriculture, the ISPCA is dependent on donations and fundraising to keep its vital operation in existence.

  “We are appealing for donations at the moment to help us cover these costs.”

You can make a donation to the Society by visiting www.ispca,ie



Group lands €10,000 bill for rescuing dogs

Irish Independent, 20/01/2005

An animal welfare group is out of pocket by €10,000 after it had to look after dogs taken from a puppy farm whose owner was yesterday convicted of cruelty.

  Liam Burke, who is in his 60s, with three farms, in Co Laois, pleaded guilty to two charges of cruelty under the Animal Cruelty Act in not providing basic care for two black Labradors and one terrier and not providing adequate medical care for a pup whose wound had become infected.

  Burke has farms at Loughtglass, Ballyadams and Ballylinan.  The dogs and puppies involved included Labradors, terriers and German Shepards.

  Judge Mary Martin fined Burke €1,000 payable to the ISPCA, gave him the Probation Act and banned him from keeping dogs for life.

  However, Judge Martin, at Carlow District Court, refused to grant an application by the ISPCA to be paid the €10,000 it has cost to look after the dogs.

  Garda Brendan Shelly previously told the court that Burke’s barn at Loughglass was inspected by the ISPCA, the dog warden and a vet on February 5 last.  He described the premises as “appalling.”

  The animals were in varying states of deprivation, some with wound infections.

  Burke had been breeding dogs commercially for seven years.

  The court had heard the case was “as bad as they came” in terms of negligence towards animal care.  Evidence was given that the Loughglass premises was inspected again on December 8.  The dog warden found there were 29 dogs and two puppies there.

  Defence barrister Paul O’Shea, BL, agreed his client would release the dogs into the ownership of the ISPCA after the court heard that Burke who underwent a triple by-pass and could not work anymore.

  Judge Martin said it was a “bad case” but took into consideration Burke’s health problems.

  After the case, Brendan Hughes, ISPCA regional officer said they were pleased the owner was banned from keeping dogs.  But he warned that the ISPCA’s failure to recoup the cost for minding the animals could affect its future service.



Sicko Stubs Out Ciggies On Dog

News of the World, 29/07/2007

These are the horrific pictures taken after a dog was found covered in CIGARETTE burns inflicted by an evil sadist.  The covering, 14-month-old greyhound – given the name Aaron by the owners of animal welfare group PAWS – was found last week with 27 burns all over its face and body.  It was taken to the rescue kennel in Mullinnahone, Co Tipperary, after being spotted wandering nearyby.  And shelter owners Gina and Tom Molloy said the sickening cruelty has left the poor pup scarred for life.


Cruelty

Tom, 43, said: “The person responsible still hasn’t been caught – what kind of person would inflict such cruelty on an animal? We’ll keep him with us for a few months until he’s well enough to be placed with a responsible owner who will give him the love he needs.”

  Sadly, the horrific cruelty inflicted on Aaron is just one of hundreds of cases seen by the kennel each year.

  Tome said: “Unfortunately, this kind of abuse is not unusual. We are seeing an increasing number of cases each week. We’re full to bursting point at the moment – we’re even having to keep dogs in our own house. We get €25,000 a year Government funding, but rely on the generosity of the public to meet the €400,000 running costs.”

Donations to PAS can be made to AIP in NAAS, Co Kildare. Account 07680026, sort code 933236.



Sick Puppies

Sunday World, 03/03/2002

Animal rights campaigners have accused travellers of holding sick dogs to ransom.

  A couple running a dog refuge revealed that members of the travelling community are demanding cash to hand over ill animals.  Clare-based Sybil Hinze said that the dog owners refuse to allow their pets be taken away for treatment until they get up to £50 in cash.

  Sybil and husband Nick have been running a shelter for abused animals in Broad ford for three years.


Campaign

They also warned that ill-treatment of pets is not just confined for a major public educ6ation campaign.

  “We have picked up dogs from travellers and sometimes you do have to pay them to get the animals,” she said.

  “Some people won’t just give you the dog and there is no legal power that we have to seize the dogs. We are not the police. There is no law against tying a dog up to a caravan and leaving it there. All we can do is ask them nicely but they usually want money. They buy and sell dogs anyway. They ask for £30 or £50 for dogs. It depends on what you are willing to pay. But it is not only a travellers’ issue. There are other people, mostly farmers who can be ignorant of how to treat animals. People just need to be educated.”

Animal lover Sybil, who has seven dogs in her own home, also said some owners can become aggressive when rescuers try and seize their dogs.

  “It is not only the travellers but they can be aggressive,” she explained. “They do not like being told that they are doing any wrong with the animals. To try to take a dog from them or ask them for it when they don’t want to give it can make some of them very aggressive. But it is a matter of realising that a dog sometimes needs to see a vet and get vaccinations. We have picked up animals that travellers have just left behind, tied to trees after they move on. They are homeless and starving and in a bad condition.”

Sybil and Nick called for an education campaign for animal owners after the horrific death of a pony during a backstreet harness race this week.

  The animal died in agony after being forced to gallop at speeds of 30 mph in the race which took place in Castlemaine, Co Kerry.

  The incident highlighted the lack of resources for tackling animal cruelty in Ireland and sparkled outrage among animal lovers around the country.



Ten poor puppies cruelly drowned

The Star, 13/10/2006

Ten tiny puppies have been found cruelly drowned in an old compost bag weighted down by a rock. The gruesome discovery was made by an environment activist close to the idyllic village of Clonegal in Co Carlow.

  The pups, barely a week old, were drowned in a natural pool in an area known as ‘The Sandpits’ c6lose to the village.

  “I could see the animals had been drowned. They were in a bag with a cement block,” explained the activist.

“It is incredibly cruel. Puppies and animals feel cold, hunger, pain and thirst, all the things we feel,” said an ISPCA spokesperson.



Asian man rebuked for dog cruelty

Irish Independent, 10/10/2006

An Asian student whose pet dog had to have a hind leg amputated as a result of “appalling cruelty” has been sharply rebuked by a district court judge.

  Judge Tom Fizpatrick ordered Marco Law of Assaroe View, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal, to pay up more than €2,500 when he appeared before him at Ballyshannon District Court.

  “The dog was in extreme pain. A rope had obviously been tied tightly around the leg which was grossly swollen and there was a very strong smell of decaying flesh,” he said.

Law, who studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway, admitted cruelty to the dog, a cross-bred collie called King, on November 30 last year.



Drunken farmer cruelly beat, tortured wife’s dog

Irish Independent, 10/12/1999

A drunken farmer who beat his wife’s pet dog so badly that it had to be put down, was told to continue attending an alcohol treatment course when he appeared before a court in Galway yesterday.

  Michael Creaven, from Tumnahulla, Corrandulla, Co Galway, pleaded guilty to cruelly beating and torturing the black and white collie, outside his estranged wide home on June 26 last.

  The farmer, in his forties, has been living in a shed near the family home since his wife got a Safety Order against him in the courts in 1996.  He was also charged with breaching this Order in that, while cruelly beating the dog, he put his wide, Mary Creaven, in fear of such violence being used against her.

Judge Murrough Connellan adjourned the case until February 10, to see if Creaven would stay off the drink, on condition that he continue receiving treatment.



Sick trade in cruelly bred pups

Evening Herald, 28/05/1996

It’s the nightmare cruelty case which has horrified every dog-lover in the country.  see more



Officials put down 22 dogs at ‘hellhole’ puppy farm

Irish Independent, 27/05/1996

Animal cruelty officers uncovered a “hell-hole” for dogs and had to put down 22 animals after a raid on an outhouse in a Dublin garden.  They were appalled at the gruesome discovery in which the dogs were kept in cage like boxes. A pigeon loft was also discovered which housed 60 birds. They had to be released into the air.

  Therese Cunningham, director of the DSPCA, described the case as one of the most appalling she had ever come across.  She said:”This raises the question about the possibility of this being a puppy farm. It sounds like at some stage the dogs were being bred for sale.”

  Under present Irish laws anyone could have a puppy farm in their backgarden, she said.

  The society initially acted on Saturday after receiving a tip off. The raid involved Inspector John Dunne of the DSCPCA and dog warden John Boylan.  The house occupant was not there at the time, but the officers succeeded in getting into the back garden. What they were confronted with there horrified them.

  Some of the cages could not be opened and one had to be forced open. Dogs were found chewing through the box-like cages. One dog got into another garden had was scavenging through a rubbish bag in desperate search of food.


Put to sleep

A leaking water pipe in the outhouse was pouring down water on the suffering animals. The dogs were mainly Yorkshire terriers. Two were cross bred fox terriers. One animal had no hair left.

  The officers reported that about 60 pigeons were kept in a filthy loft which was built in such a way that it could not be cleaned out.  Inspector Dunne described what he saw as a “hell-hole for dogs”.  Vet Garrett Freyne, who was called in, said some dogs were put down on Saturday and the rest on Sunday. A further visit to the premises yesterday uncovered two more dogs. In all 12 female and 10 male dogs had to be put down.

  “They had no human contact or kindness given to them,” the vet said. “They were terrified, cooped up in a crazy situation.” He said one dog had starved to death. She was attacked by others because she was in season.

  He told how he had to wade through urine and faeces. There was no ventilation in the outhouse which was stinking. The dogs were infected with fleas and lice and covered in mange. One animal had jaundice.  Ms Cunningham: “I am absolutely disgusted by the whole story.”

  The DSPCA now plan a full and speedy prosecution.  She added: “We should have legislation like in Britain, where people can’t open a kennel without planning permission. It should cover standards and the need to have a licence.”




11 to be tried for animal cruelty

Irish Times, 20/04/2005

The trial of 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare will begin at Naas Circuit Court in July.  The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare. The men have all been charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act, 1911.

  Yesterday Judge Patrick McCartan said the case was of priority and it should be the first heard in the next court session which begins on July 5th.

  “it’s the type of case, if left lingering in the list, it will never get out of the traps,” he said.

He immediately said he had not intended the use of such wards as a rumble of suppressed laughter spread around the court.  The Judge was informed the case would take approximately a week and would require a jury.

  Seven counsel are representing the men, some of whom requested further disclosure of specific documents.

  Judge McCartan was informed there would be 17 witnesses involved in the trial.  He suggested that all parties return to court in mid-June to ensure that all issues of disclosure had been revolved before the trial proceeded.

  The defendants are on bail on their own bond of €500 and are expected to plead not guilty to the charges.

The accused are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.



Garda saw men flee dog fight

Evening Herald, 08/07/2005

A garda described how he came across a dog fight in progress when he raided a Kildare farm.  When gardai burst in, several men fled the scene.  Gardai and members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) had taken part in the raid on the buildings on private lands, Sgt Con O’Sullivan said.  When the door of the building at Brockagh in Robertstown was opened on the morning of October 31, 2003 three or four men had ran away towards open fields, he explained.

  The raid had come about after information that the dog figh1t was going on.  Three or four vehicles were parked outside the farm buildings, Sgt O’Sullivan told Naas Circuit Court.  The raid happened at 11am on a bank holiday Friday where gardai found two distressed dogs in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial, which is estimated to take another four days, will hear evidence from a number of gardai from Newbridge and Robertstown stations as well as members of the ISPCA.

  The nine accused men are: Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.

  One of the charges, under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, is that the men cruelly ill-treated two animals while the other stated they assisted in the fighting of animals.

After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two other accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.



Two men found not guilty in illegal dog fighting case

Irish Independent, 08/07/2005

Two men charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight in Co Kildare have been found not guilty because of an absence of evidence.  John Moody of Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue, and Anthony Burke of Corstwon, Oldcastle, Co Meath, were releas,07ed on the direction of Judge Patrick McCartan at Naas circuit court yesterday.  The two were on trial along with nine others. The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.  All of the men pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting.

  After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two of the accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.

  Earlier Sgt Con O’Sullivan of Newbridge Garda Station said that when he entered a farm building at Brockagh he found two dogs fighting each other in a specially constructed ring.  When the door of the building was opened, three or four men ran away.

  During the raid, by members of the gardai and the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, two distressed dogs were found in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial of the other nine men is estimated to take another four days and will continue on Tuesday.



Rescued: Savaged animals found in a pen during raid on farmhouse

Evening Herald, 07/07/2005

Cash found in raid on ‘dog fight’

Two dogs who were pitted against each other to the death were saved by gardai after officers swooped on a farmhouse in the middle of an illegal dog fight, it is alleged.  The savaged animals were found in a pen in the farm house at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, a court heard.  The raid, which also involved members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA), came on foot of confidential information received by the gardai.

  Eleven men were charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight at Naas Circuit Court.

  The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare. All pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting in the court.

  Counsel for the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) said some of the men on the farm were found with money on them when officers arrived at the scene.  He also said a number of other men may got away after they ran when the raid started.

The 11 accused men are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham, all in Dublin.



Charges against two dropped in illegal dogfight case in Kildare

Irish Times, 08/07/2005

The case against two of the 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare was dropped yesterday.

  Judge Patrick McCartan told the jury he would be directing a not-guilty verdict in relation to Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath, and John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue. He sad there was not enough evidence to connect them to the alleged dog fight.

  Most of the day was taken up with legal argument in the absence of the jury.

  The remaining defendants face charges on two counts of animal cruelty. They are Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, River Road, Allenwood, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham. The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st 2003, in a shed at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare.

  The court was earlier told that when gardai arrived at the shed that morning shortly after 11am, several men ran from the building and were followed by the officers. On entering the shed, the gardai noticed that there were two dogs in a galvanised ring fighting each other. There were also several men in the shed.

The case has been adjourned until July 12th.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

Savage: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart two blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.  And they spent five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brockagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.

  Five men were found guilty of cruelty ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.


Offence

A jury in Naas circuit court found the five men guilty and another man not guilty.

  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

  Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all make jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other day by the neck,” Garda Steve Kenneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Sheep farmer accused of shooting neighbour’s dog

Irish Independent, 09/02/2005

A farmer appeared in court yesterday charged with shooting his neighbour’s pet dog.

  Sean O’Shea, with an address at East Hill House, Glasson, Athlone, Co Westmeath, was charged with discharging a firearm near a public road. The farmer had claimed he had shot the dog because the animal was worrying his sheep.  And in a separate incident, the farmer was also charged with allowing a dead heifer lie on his land.

  David Henshaw told the court that on February 26 last year, he let his red setter dog out at about 1.30pm. However, at about 3.30pm that evening he got a call from a neighbour to say that his dog was dying on her front lawn.

  Mr Henshaw came home and found the dog dying and with a hole under his chin. He confronted a neighbour, Mr O’Shea, because he knew he had shot dogs in the past.

  Mr O’Shea claimed he had shot the dog from a shed on his land. However, the court heard evidence that the dog had died on a neighbour’s front lawn.  Noreen O’Rourke told the court that she had come home from work at about 3pm and 15 minutes later she heard her children screaming after they got off their school bus. She saw the dog dying in her front garden.

  Mr Henshaw took pictures of the scene, including a blood trail, which was several hundred feet away from where Mr O’Shea said he shot the dog. The case was adjourned for a week.



Man faces dog fight charge

Irish Independent, 18/02/2005

A Dublin man charged in connection with an illegal dog fight at Robertstown, Co Kildare has been sent forward for trial to Naas Circuit Criminal Court on April 19.

Karl Breen, of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin was remanded in custody with consent to bail on his own bond of €300 and an independent surety of €600.



New raids on puppy farms free animals in distress

A dog’s life…but is was never meant to be like this, full of cruelty and neglect

Irish Independent, 07/02/2004

An animal welfare group’s war against people running puppy farms continued in Laois and Offaly yesterday as 73 dogs, many in distress, were found during a two-day raid.  ISPCA officers, gardai and veterinary inspectors found 58 of the dogs at one particular location in Laois.  The dogs included newborn puppies, terriers, German Shepherds, collies, Labradors and Poms. Many were malnourished, mange-ridden and ulcerated.

  Ireland is the chief puppy farm location in Europe, and has no regulations governing the industry. Irish dogs are regularly sent to the UK or to the US.

  ISPCA officials hope the latest swoop in a nationwide clampdown on unregulated puppy farms will spur punters not to buy dogs from such dealers. On average each month the ISPCA raids one or two puppy farms which can house 10 to 500 animals.

  The ISPCA wants punishment for those who keep dogs in such conditions to be dealt with by the courts. Alastair Keen, ISPCA operations director, said many of the dogs were held in small cages with no real shelter or bedding.

  “We now want to see more consistency when these cases are brought to court and want (these) people to be banned from keeping dogs for life. Fines and even jail terms will not suffice,” he said.

Those involved in one raid waded through up to 12 inches of mud, fac6es and urine to locate the puppies. All the dogs are being catalogued and transported to the Ulster SPCA, as all the ISPCA’s facilities are full.  Officials are hoping all the dogs found in Co Laois will survive.

  Last week, gardai and animal cruelty inspectors removed 110 Dachshunds from a farm in north Co Tipperary where they were kept in freezing conditions without running water.  Twenty-one of the dogs were found in dark and cold conditions in boxes in an old cottage, while 17 puppies were found in cages in an old van used specifically for storage of animals.  Seventy-two other dogs were kept in an open yard in pens – some of which were made from old wooden pallets and rope. Brendan Hughes, another ISPCA inspector, said Ireland was infamous for being the “puppy farm capital” of Europe, and was home to cruel and barbaric breeders who sold the young dogs for massive profits.

  “It can be very, very lucrative when you realise that these people spend virtually no money on premises and they spend little or no money on veterinary care,” he told RTE radio.

He said a Cavalier Kind Charles Spaniel could sell for €300 to €350, and puppy farms were selling up to 700 dogs per year in the UK and the US.

  Mr Hughes said the ISPCA depended on tip-offs from the public. “Without those people contacting us directly we would never know about these things because most of these puppy farms are in out-of-the-way places,” he said.

  “They are very secretive because the conditions are so bad and people don’t want anybody to know what kind of conditions they are keeping these animals in.”



Dogfight case is adjourned

Irish Times, 18/11/2004

The case against 12 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight was adjourned until December 16th at Naas District Court yesterday.  The defence requested the adjournment because it said it needed more time to consider the matter.  The alleged offec6es are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.



Dog burned to death in Tyrone bonfire

Irish Times, 03/11/2004

A spokesperson for the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals yesterday described the deliberate burning to death of a dog in a bonfire in Co Tyrone over the Halloween weekend as “the actions of depraved people”.

  The one-year-old mongrel was tied up and then placed in crates in the centre of the bonfire in the village of Glebe, about six miles from Strabane. Dozens of parents and children who had gathered around the bonfire only became aware that the dog was burning to death when they heard yelping coming from the centre of the fire.

  “We couldn’t believe it at first,” said Mr Sean Elliott, chairperson of the Glebe Community Association.

  “We tried to get at the dog to pull it from the fire but were driven back by the flames. The lighting of a bonfire is a tradition in the village. It normally starts at eight o’clock but a group of boys were seen throwing petrol onto the fire at about half past seven and then running off.”

Everybody started to arrive around the bonfire, parents and children, many of them in fancy dress. Then all of a sudden we heard the cries and yelps from the dog. It was awful. The children started screaming and crying, we tried to get at the dog but we couldn’t and then the parents took the children home.

“I’ll never forget hearing that dog yelping. It went on for over a quarter of an hour but the flames were so high and the fire so hot we just couldn’t get at it. These people who did this are just crazy. The children had just come from a party in the community centre and the bonfire was just outside the grounds of St. Theresa’s Primary School where most of the children go to school. All the talk in the school grounds this morning was about the poor dog,” he said. The dog’s owner Mrs Mary Wilson was too distressed to talk about what happened.



Dog fight verdict is overturned

Evening Herald, 30/05/2006

Two men today successfully had their convictions for cruelty to animals quashed at the Court of Criminal Appeal.  

Troy Jordan of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, and David Deegan of Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, had been convicted of cruelty to two Pitt bull terrier bitches on October 31, 2003, at Naas, Co Kildare.

  Both men took a successful application for leave to appeal against the conviction to the Court of Criminal Appeal which quashed the conviction.

The incident in October 2003 involved two bloodied dogs fighting in a steel pen.

  The court held that there was no evidence of gambling or fleeing from arrest.  The Court of Criminal Appeal therefore took the view that the jury in the original case could not beyond reasonable doubt have come to a conclusion that there was encouragement on the part of either man.

  Mr Jordan had been originally sentenced to 18 months behind bars, while Mr Deegan had been originally ordered to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence.



Pups recover after horror Halloween river stunt

Irish Independent, 03/11/2003

Two little Springer spaniel pups continue to make a miraculous recovery after being dumped in a sealed box in a river in a Halloween stunt.  Dodder and River, the eight week old pups, were left to either suffocate or drown when they were thrown into Dublin’s Dodder river in a sealed box last Friday.

 The pair were rescued when the box was spotted by two 13-year-old boys as it floated past the Mill Pub in Tallaght. They climbed into the river and pulled the box out and were amazed to find the terrified pups inside.

  Last night the Dublin Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (DSPCA) were calling on the public to help them apprehend whoever sealed the pups in the floating coffin.

  Education Officer Gillian Bird said: “This is just typical of the type of thoughtlessness that goes on with people especially around Halloween.”

  The DSPCA believe the dogs may have been stolen before they were sealed into the box as Springer pups retail at around €500.




Fighting dog found in GAA star’s home

Evening Herald, 21/04/2006

Police and animal welfare officials are investigating a top GAA star after a pitbull fighting dog was discovered during a raid on his house.

  Tyrone’s Ger Cavlan was caught in possession of the illegal terrier, dog fighting magazines, a detailed book of local fights, diet sheets and a treadmill.

  The dog found has been linked to the infamous underground practice of dog fights by animal welfare charity the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA).

  After the raid they said they were also extremely worried about the welfare of three more dogs they believe had been in the house.

  While the footballer has denied the ownership of the items he could now be prosecuted for having them in his possession.

  He could face not only a prison sentence – it is illegal to own pitbulls in Northern Ireland – but a hefty fine and a ban on keeling animals.

  In a statement from his solicitor, Mr Cavlan said that while he does keep dogs he did not own the one discovered during the raid at his Dungannon home last Wednesday night.

  The USPCA said that after inspection, a vet had found the male dog’s injuries to be consistent with the kind of wounds that would be inflicted during a dog fight.



History made as dog fight swoop lands handle in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in thbe8 history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunary Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Deegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.



Dog put down for garda standoff

Evening Herald, 09/09/2005

A teenager who used his Staffordshire terrier as “a weapon” in a standoff with gardai failed yesterday to prevent the animal’s destruction.

  Daniel Kavanagh (19), currently facing criminal damage charges following alleged threats to burn down the home of a neighbour, denied his dog was dangerous.

Gardai successfully applied to have the dog destroyed after an incident outside his home in Cherry Orchard Crescent, Ballyfermot, on August 5 last.

  Dublin District Court heard gardai had knocked on Kavanagh’s door at around 1am after he threatened to burn down a neighbour’s house.

  He closed the door in their faces, but seconds later returned with the dog and used it to goad the gardai.  He then walked out of the house through the group of officers and threatened to set the beast on them.

  A garda told the court yesterday that it was only “by the grace of God” that the dog did not bite anyone.

  A few days after the incident, gardai returned for the dog with a warrant and a DSPCA officer.

  Kavanagh was meanwhile in custody having been refused bail when the neighbour told another court that he feared for his safety.  Kavanagh, who was still in custody yesterday, said the dog was not vicious and it only “went for gardai when they started hitting me”.

Judge Angela Ni Chonduin said the evidence showed she had to put the dog down.



Ex garda ‘took hurl to pet dog’

He was one of a number of people arrested by internal affairs detectives probing the leaking of sensitive police information to the IRA.

  The High Court awarded him the money over the affair but the Supreme Court has now ruled he was not entitled the compo.  Now it can also be revealed that he has appeared in court accused of cruelty and battering a neighbour’s pet with a hurley.

  Walsh denied beating and killing the 10-year-old sheep-dog owned by his elderly neighbours, Philip and Kathleen Doyle, on October 11 last year.  But he subsequently agreed a pay to undisclosed charity donation to the SPCA to avoid conviction.

  Nenagh District Court heard Walsh had intervened in a row between his sheep-dog and the dog owned by the Doyles.


Evidence

In evidence, Mr Doyle said his dog Rex was lying outside his gate when Mr Walsh’s pet ran up and attacked him.  He said Walsh followed up behind and proceed to strike his dog with a hurley “with all his force” on three of four occasions.

  Mr Doyle said the retired garda then walked into a nearby school with his dog and shouted to him that he was sorry that his dog had died of a “heart attack”.  Mrs Doyle said she had been “dumbfounded” by Mr Walsh’s actions.

  The court heard both dogs had a history of fighting, and according to Walsh, had been involved in “thousands of skirmishes” since the Doyles moved to the estate a number of years previously.

  Walsh told the court that the dog had been removed by the SPCA to University College Dublin for a post-mortem examination, but the cause of death turned out to be inconclusive.

  His solicitor, Michael Collins, speculated the dog could have died of “shock” as a result of the fight.

  Walsh told the court he was “deeply upset” by the charge levelled against him and said he had been and animal lover all his life.  He agreed to pay an undisclosed sum of money to the Roscrea branch of the SPCA.  The proposal was accepted by the Doyles and no conviction was recorded against Mr Walsh in respect of the charge.

Walsh (63), of Oaklawn Drive, Nenagh, Co Tipperary, was awarded €175,000 by the High Court in May 2003 after it ruled he and a separated mother-of-four, Kay   Bedford, were wrongfully arrested and detained 14 years ago on suspicion of being members of the IRA.  However, the State subsequently appealed the award and the Supreme Court yesterday overturned the judgement which rule in favour of Walsh.




Dog-killer accused to make charity donation

Irish Independent, 20/07/2005

A retired garda accused of beating a dog to death with a hurley agreed to pay compensation to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals yesterday.

  Anslem Walsh denied killing the 10-year-old dog owned by his elderly neighbours, Phillip and Kathleen Doyle.

  Mr Doyle said his dog, Rex, was lying outside his gate on October 11 last year when Mr Walsh’s pet ran up and attacked him. He said Mr Walsh followed up behind and proceeded to strike his dog with a hurley “with all his force” on three of four occasions.

  Mr Walsh, of Oaklawn Drive, Nenagh, told the court he was “deeply upset” by the charge. He apologised for the incident and said his only intention was to separate the dogs.

  He agreed to pay an undisclosed sum of money to the Roscrea branch of the SPCA. The proposal was accepted by the Doyle and no conviction was recorded.




Little pups tails were left to fall off

Evening Herald, 24/03/2006

Three puppies discovered by an animal welfare instructor at a Dublin home had their tails “docked” – and tow had tourniquets on them.  Two seven week old pups with tourniquets had very swollen tails while a third, 10-week-old pup, had already lost its tail.

  “Docking” withers the tail and causes it to fall off.

  DSPCA welfare inspector Liam Kinsella said the dogs’ owner, Raymond Costello of Chapelizod Road, Dublin, admitted he was responsible for the docking.


Ill-treating

Mr Costello was fined €850 in his absence at Dublin District Court after he failed to appear in court on a charge of ill-treating three Yorkshire Terrier pups at his home on September 7 last year. Docking is used in dog breeding for cosmetic purposes, but is considered by animal welfare groups to be mutilation.

  The animals were taken to veterinary surgeon Joe Neylon, who said there were infections in the tails of the two younger pups.  The pups, who were in psin and distress, were treated, although the tails could not be saved.

  Judge Ann Watkins said although Mr Costello did not turn up in court, it was not a case of ongoing cruelty as he had no previous convictions.  She refused an application to disqualify him from owning dogs.  She also refused a DSPCA application to retain the dogs in their keep which means they will have to be returned to Mr Costello.  She ordered that he pay €150 costs as well as the €850 fine.

  A second alleged cruelty case over a malnourished Boxer dog was dismissed by Judge Watkin because the prosecution was “drawing deductions of cruelty” from its condition.

  Ballymun Horse Project founder, Victoria McElligott of Crannoge Close, Poppintree, Dublin, denied she was the owner of the Boxer bitch which was found by the DSPCA in a makeshift enclosure in the horse project’s tables on November 2 last.  She claimed it was owned by her daughter, Vicky junior.

  The court heard the dog had no access to food and water and its ribs were sticking out.




Owner jailed over starvation of dogs

Irish Times, 28/02/2009

A man who allowed two dogs to starve to death in his back garden has been jailed for five months and banned from ever owning an animal again.

  Michael Farrell, of Kilmahuddrick Road, Clondalkin, Dublin, appeared before Portlaoise District Court yesterday.

  The court heard how two boxer dogs belonging to Farrell (26) had died from starvation and were dead for up to 10 days before being discovered by ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes. He told the court he called to Farrell’s address at the time in Lake Glen, Kilminchy, Portlaoise, on December 18th, 2007, after a complaint. He found a male and a female fog left lying, one on top of the other in a small kennel. They were in a “state of decomposition”.

  Father-of-three Farrell was charged with cruelty to animals, permitting a carcass to remain unburied and having no licence.

  Mr Hughes said Farrell had told him he last fed the dogs on December 9th and that when he came back from a trip to Dublin on December 12th they were dead.

  The defendant said he believed the dogs had been poisoned but the post-mortem had shown there was no poison in their system and they had died from starvation.

Judge Gerard Haughton said Farrell consciously neglected the dogs; he knew he had them and did not feed them. He jailed Farrell for five months and banned him from ever owning an animal again on the charge of cruelty to animals with the other two charges taken into consideration.




ISPCA dog pounds ‘barbaric and cruel’

Sunday Tribune, 13/10/1996

The ISPCA has been accused of cruelty to animals at some of its dog pounds throughout the country.  The allegations have been made by an animal welfare group.  The Irish Trust For The Protection And Care for Animals (ITPCA), which has condemned the ISPCA’s policy of putting down dogs using a bolt gun.

  The ISPCA says that conditions and practices at dog pounds in Sligo, Kerry Ennis and Roscommon amount to cruelty to the animals there.  Following visits to the pounds two weeks ago, which they filmed, the Trust called on the ISPCA to “monitor animal shelters in rural areas or withdraw from the dog warden service.”

  The ISPCA told The Sunday Tribune that it was aware that conditions at some pounds “were not up to scratch.  We are currently trying to persuade local authorities to upgrade standards.”

  The Trust claims that chloroform and bolt guns are used regularly in the Kerry pound.  “These have no place in animal welfare,” said Robert Doyle, a director.  “It is a barbaric, outdated and cruel practice.”  He criticised the lack of veterinary input into the killing of animals.  The shootings were usually carried out by dog wardens “who should not be the arbitrator between the life and death of an animal,” he said.  The ISPCA acknowledged that bolt guns were used but denied it was a cruel way to kill animals.

  Doyle’s film of the Ennis pound showed dogs of all ages in an enclosed room with no outdoor area and, apparently, no natural light.  One of the dogs was continually scratching and seemed to have an eye lesion.  There were also faeces littering the room and many of the dogs appeared bloated suggesting, said Doyle, that they had worms.

  In Kerry,  Doyle said the pound was situated “next to a slaughter house where pigs are killed on a daily basis.  We would consider this to be inappropriate and causes stress to the dogs,” he added.

  Mr Doyle said he had called the gardai to the Roscommon pound when he noticed a dog tied in a kennel “and in danger of strangulation.”  The dog was standing in water but “the rope around its neck was too short and did not allow the animal to lie down without getting wet.  The inside of the building was almost dark and a greyhound appeared to me to be in need of veterinary treatment.”

  The Trust has called for the closure of the dog pounds in Roscommon and Sligo, where it claims conditions for animals are also poor.  It also wants an end to the use of bolt guns which it described as a “form of cutprice dog control.  That euthanasia is necessary at all is distressing.  To have animals shot in the head – a shot that has no guarantee of success – by an organisation that is supposed to prevent cruelty is beyond belief.”

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Ciaran O’Donovan rejected these claims, arguing that “new keneels are to be built in Sligo which will create a lot of extra space for the animals.  I am aware of the problems in Roscommon but the local authority there has included money in its estimates for a new pound so that problem should be sorted soon as well.”

  Conditions at most pounds were excellent, he said.  “It would be nice to hear the Trust praise those as well as criticising the minority of pounds where conditions are poor.”



llegal fireworks used to kill pets

Animals strapped to deadly bangers

The Star, 06/10/2004

Illegal fireworks and bangers are being strapped to puppies and kittens before being ignited and set off in a number of Limerick c6ity estates it was claimed today.  Young animals have been killed or seriously maimed by “gangs of youths who take perverse pleasure” from tying the fireworks to pups and kittens, a gardai source told the Star.

  The source added that it’s a growing problem across a number of Limerick city suburbs.

  “It has happened in the past in a number of suburbs including Ballinacurra Weston, Saint Mary’s Park, Moyross and Southill.

  “Gangs of youths and teenagers are the culprits. It is a terrible thing to hear about,” said the source.


Week

One Weston resident claimed residents and pet owners on the city’s southside are “terrified” about fireworks in the weeks before Halloween.

  “They see this as a perverse form of pleasure. They tie the fireworks or bangers to the bac6ks of puppies and kittens before setting them off.

  “They often stick the fireworks into the ground before lighting them to see will the animals shoot into the air. They kill or seriously injure the pups or kittens involved,” reported the Weston woman.

A Garda spokesman for Henry Street Crime Prevention Office reports that fireworks are in circulation around the city.

  “Fireworks are still illegal in this country and have been sourced illegally by criminal gangs and are very dangerous as there is no proper standard or quality control.

  “I want to appeal to parents in particular to be alert for children having fireworks in their possession. Elderly neighbours are often a target for young thugs who for some reason find it amusing to terrorise an older person by throwing fireworks in their door or letterbox,” said the spokesman.

Niamh Allen of Limerick Animal Welfare said: “There are animals being killed or maimed mysteriously at this time of year – it is very sad.

“The fireworks and bangers drive dogs and pets crazy. It is very important to keep pets indoors in the evenings.”



Puppies found in van on way to UL

Irish Independent, 13/02/2004

Thirty puppy dogs have been found crammed into a van on a 13-hour journey to England.

The 30 puppies, thought to be en route from an Offaly puppy farm to a Lincolnshire pet shop, were followed on the Holyhead ferry by ISPCA inspectors. However, when stopped by police and examined, none of the dogs were found to be suffering under the legal condition, and the van was allowed to continue on its journey.



17,000 dogs die

Busy owners dump unloved pets

News of the World, 13/11/2005

Uncaring owners are responsible for 17,000 dogs being put down in Ireland every year.  This means that 45 dogs are being destroyed every day.

  Now a dog charity is trying to combat the problem by encouraging pet owners to neuter their animals.

  Dog Trust Ireland’s Eilis Denieffe is urging pet owners to call the trust’s National Neuter Hotline, 1890 946 336, to be referred to a local vet.  She said neutering is a simple procedure that also has great health benefits for dogs – it can protect against certain types of cancer.


Stray

Eilis, the charity’s education officer, said if their major neutering scheme takes off it could dramatically reduce the number of stray and abandoned dogs.  Her organisation has begun a pilot scheme in Cork which is proving an overwhelming success, with more than 600 calls made to their hotline.  Hundreds of dogs are already booked in for their operation.

  And Cork people on means-tested benefit can have their dogs neutered for a reduced fee. Eilis said: “The response from the public has been absolutely fantastic.  We’re confident that we can really make a difference to dog welfare in Cork.” Nationally she described the number of dogs being put down as “terrible”.

  And, with Christmas fast approaching, she fears a new influx of unwanted dogs facing an uncertain future.

  She said: “We want to warn people to really THINK before getting a dog this Christmas.”

  She believes some busy parents tend to buy dogs for their children out of guilt.

  She explained: “Guilt has become a major factor in people getting a dog – they tend to do this because they can’t spend as much time with their child as they would want. And, in the new fast-paced world of the tiger economy, more and more pet owners see their dogs which may be conflicting with their busy lives, as disposable objects.”

Eilis teaches interactive workshops in Dublin schools on responsible pet ownership.



Cruel owner flings pup out car window

Evening Herald, 20/10/2005

This defenceless eight-week-old pup died from agonising injuries after she was deliberately flung from a car window.

  The sickening cruelty happened in Tallaght and the little dog suffered a fractured pelvis, broken bones and extreme internal wounds after its owner literally threw the unwanted pet away while driving at speed.

  The DSPCA today appealed for anyone with information on the malicious crime to contact local gardai in Tallaght.

  The female Labrador cross was in a state of severe shock after the incident. A vet felt the pelvic injury was irreparable and put the animal to sleep, the DSPCA told the Evening Herald. One horrified motorist, who was driving behind he pup’s owner, was en route to the vet herself when she spotted the incident and came to the rescue of the stricken puppy.

  The DSPCA has condemned the terrible act, which happened late last month, saying it is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen this kind of thing before, “ said the DSPCA’s Salee,0a O’Loughlin, adding that the owner may have reacted in frustration as puppies need a lot of love and attention.

  With Halloween just around the corner the DSPCA is bracing itself for a flood of calls.

  “It’s a complete nightmare,” said O’Loughlin about the job ahead.

She told how last year three boys had called from door-to-door looking for bonfire fodder and were handed a wicker basket to throw on the flames.

  It wasn’t until the innocent youngsters heard whimpers from inside that they discovered four kittens.

The DSPCA believes the owner deliberately tried to get rid of the kittens, but they were pulled from the fire in time and survived.



Give us back our dog

Shattered owners make desperate pleas for their beloved stolen pooches to be returned unharmed

The Star, 09/04/2006

Hundreds of animal lovers around Ireland have fallen victim to the dognapping trend that has swept the country.  see more



Raids target rare dogs, says breeder

Irish Times, 03/05/2005

The owner o almost a dozen Chihuahua dogs, stolen from a house in Tralee, Co Kerry at the weekend, believes rare breeds of dogs are being targeted by gangs in the Limerick and north Kerry areas.

  Two mothers, along with a male, the father o the families, and eight pups were stolen of the home of Marian O’Connor, at Brackrock, Upper Rock Street, Tralee in the early hours of Friday morning.

  The so-called toy dogs were all thoroughbred and are conservatively valued at €10,000.

  Gardai believe the theft was planned by a group intent on selling the rare dogs. “Someone knew they were being bred there and they had a means of transport to carry them off,” Sgt Bill Browne of Tralee said.

  There have been a number of such thefts in the Limerick and north Kerry areas in recent months, and many breeders are increasingly aware their dogs may be a target, said Ms O’Connor, a well-known breeder of the Chihuahua, a Mexican breed.

  She believes the theft was “not a very professional operation,” but she was targeted as a breeder.

  A cardboard box was emptied and the six-week-old pups were placed inside. The mothers followed quietly.

  The dogs would be sold on without papers, she said. “I believe the pups are still in the Tralee area,” yesterday.

  Ms O’Connor said she is worried about the welfare of the puppies in particular. Asked to describe the breed, Ms O’Connor said: “Chihuahuas are intelligent, friendly dogs and they are very loyal.” The pups were due to be sold on and families had already chosen their pups. One woman who had picked out two of the Chihuahua pups has been searching on the internet and issuing alerts, Ms O’Connor added.

  The dog, with a white beard, answers to the name of Toby, while the foxy coloured female answers to Gemma, and the black and white female answers to Jade. The pups are of varying colours.

  Anyone with information is asked to contact Tralee gardai at 066-7102322.




Freezing dog left to die giving birth to her eight pups

Cruelty beyond belief as new-borns perish on St Partick’s Day

Evening Herald, 31/03/2006

This pitiful pregnant dog and her eight pups have all perished because the mother’s cruel owner left her vainly fighting for life.

  The exhausted and heavily pregnant dog was discovered freezing and crouching under bushes in south Dublin waiting to give birth.

  She was covered with severe mange, with bad cuts and sores and was trying to find a little shelter where she could deliver her pups on one of the coldest nights of the year.

  The gentle 10-year-old Lurcher eventually did give birth to eight tiny, undernourished pups, buut they were too weak to survive and had no chance.

  And their withering mother died in the massive effort trying to deliver the large litter.

  The dog, named Fossa by workers in the DSPCA HQ in Rathfarnham, was rescued from the bushes near an industrial estate in south Dublin on a day when the nation is celebrating all that is great about the Irish – St Patrick’s Day.

  All nine died as a result of “inexcusable neglect”, said Inspector Penny White of the DSPCA, who attended to the bitch when the charity was urgently contacted by a distressed passer-by who spotted the dog’s ordeal.

  “This dog had obviously been kept in a very bad condition over a long period of time and would have been emaciated,” said Inspector White.

  “It’s disheartening to think that because of the neglect and cruelty, a total of nine dogs died. Without the call from the concerned member of the public, this dog and her puppies would have died suffering and alone.”

The appalling waste of life follows another cruelty case heard in court last week involving the inhumane and terribly painful docking of three puppies’ tails.

  Docking is a cosmetic procedure used in dog breeding, but causes major hardship for the canine as the tail withers and falls off.

  The dogs’ owner, Raymond Costello of Chapelizod Road, Dublin, was fined €850 in his ab8sence for ill-treating three Yorkshire Terrier pups at his home on September 7 last year.

  In the case of the frightened pregnant Lurcher – a breed that’s popular among Travellers – it was admitted to the DSPCA pound on March 17th.

  “Unfortunately, due to complication at birth caused by her poor physical health and advanced age, Fossa had to be put to sleep, the puppies who were so weak, they did not survive either,” said Inspector White. Fossa had been bred many times before and had never been neutered by her owners, who basically left the animal for dead.

  When Fossa was brought to the shelter, the animal was made as comfortable as possible so she could give birth to her puppies in safety and peace.



Slaughter of pups shocks residents

Irish Independent, 27/04/2006

Gardai are investigating the brutal killing of two pet pups which were slain with a lump hummer and nailed to a fence.

  The vicious slaughter of the dogs, believed to be Jack Russell terriers, happened in Sycamore Drive in Newtownmountkennedy, Co Wicklow, last weekend.

  It is understood an allegation was made that there were complaints about the pups. The dogs were nailed to a fence between two properties.

  Gardai were called in along with the ISPCA. Wicklow County Council is also examining the case.

  The incident has left locals in a state of shock.

  Councillor Conal Kavanagh said there was deep upset among neighbours in the estate that such brutal suffering could have been inflicted.

“The council has to take that into account in their investigations as a matter of urgency, “ he added.



Sheep farmers shot dogs dead

Irish Examiner,  20/02/2015

Sheep farmers shot dead hunting dogs after lambs were slaughtered. The dogs, including beagles and cross-breeds, had been on a supervised hunt in Co Clare.

 But eight dogs broke away from the pack and attacked sheep on two separate farms in Broadford.

 The county’s dog warden Frankie Coote said yesterday the dogs killed two sheep and injured several more.

But more would possibly have been slaughtered, only for the alertness of farmers. He said the farmers, who notifiied the authorities, were acting within their rights. The lambing season is currently at its peak.

 Mr Coote said: “More than likely a deer brought them through the land and once they came on the young lambs, that was it.

 “Even supervised, if they come on a deer, it can bring them anywhere. That’s what we believe happened. There are a lot of deer in that area.”

Mr Coote said the owner of the dogs had been identified. “The owner was with the dogs when they lost the pack. This is unusual for hunting dogs to do but all dogs will do it,” he explained.

 “There were two farms. One was alerted and he went to his farm. Four of the dogs were shot while attacking the sheep.

 “Then they went up to check the neighbour’s farm and there were four more dogs up there, attacking sheep.”

The dog warden said the attacks has long-term consequences for farmers. “All of those sheep were ready to lamb. You don’t know now whether they’ll have dead lambs or other problems.”

 The incidents have been reported to gardaí.

 “It’s completely legal to shoot dogs once livestock has been attacked, once the landowner notifies the dog warden or the gardaí immediately. They contacted me and I went down and removed the carcasses. I’m now in the process of meeting the owner.”

 Mr Coote said he had never previously came across such a large number of dogs being shot together.

 “This is the most, although I’ve seen dogs shot that did a lot more damage. The reason there wasn’t more damage was the farmers had been alerted and came on them. Otherwise the dogs would have slaughtered what was there. There is no winners in this,” he reflected.



Ballyglunin farmer banned from keeping animals after cruelty conviction  

Tuam Herald, 29/10/2009

A BALLYGLUNIN farmer who left his dog untreated with a two kilo cancerous tumour hanging from its abdomen was banned from holding any animals in the future when he was convicted on a cruelty charge at Tuam District Court on Tuesday.

  Before the Court was Mar-tin Forde of Lissaniska, Ballyglunin who was described as a farmer in Court. He was fined and ordered not to keep animals again.

  Galway Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (GSPCA) issued a statement following the verdict and the Judge's ruling expressing their delight at the outcome and hoped it would serve as a warning to others who are mistreating animals.

  At Tuam Court GSPCA official Janine Zanon presented photographic evidence depicting the distressed state the dog was in before it had to be put down by Tuam Veterinary Surgeon Tom Rennick.

  Judge Geoffrey Browne on viewing the evidence said: "The poor dog, it must have been in agony." He added that there was no excuse for leaving an animal in such distress and it must have been obvious that it was ill for a considerable time.

  He was told that the tumour was the size of a melon and was estimated to weight approximately two kilos (4.51b). Ms Zanon gave details of the condition she found the dog in when she visited Forde's farm on February 27 last.

  The animal could barely walk when she arrived at Forde's home and she could see it was in severe pain. She put it in her van and brought it to the vet in Tuam. Along the way she could hear it crying in pain and when she removed it there was evidence of discharge from the tumour left in her vehicle.

  Tom Rennick estimated that the tumour could have been growing for up to two years. It was in such extreme pain when brought to the surgery that there was no option but to put it down.

  Forde's defence solicitor told the Court that her client was very apologetic for what had happened. He had twice tried to get a vet to come out and treat the dog but had failed. It was stated that. Forde himself had suffered ill health in recent times.

  Judge Browne convicted Forde of animal cruelty and imposed a fine of €750 and ordered him to pay €60 in veterinary expenses,

  He also ordered that Forde be banned from keeping any animals.

  GSPCA Spokesperson Margaret O'Sullivan told The Herald that the animal involved had endured unimaginable suffering. "This is the first in my memory that someone has been banned for life from owning a dog. Hopefully this will be a lesson for those who don't look after their animals. We will come after you and there will be prosecutions," she warned.

"We are absolutely delighted with the outcome of this case and we thank the Judge for his comments and the way he dealt with the matter," added Margaret O'Sullivan.



Dogs left for days without food and water in ISPCA run shelter

The charity say they have suspended two staff members in the Roscommon shelter.

Jounal.ie, 10/08/2014

THE ISPCA HAS suspended two staff members after 10 dogs at a Roscommon dog shelter were left without food and water for a number of days.

  The dogs were left abandoned for at least the August bank holiday weekend and were found after members of the public contacted gardaí expressing concern for the animals’ welfare.

  The shelter is run by the ISPCA and is part funded by Roscommon County Council with the animal welfare charity saying that they are treating the incident “extremely seriously”.

  Gardaí and a council employee entered the shelter last Monday after they were alerted by a member of the public that it was left unattended.

  The concerned person is understood to have initially noticed that the shelter was closed the week previously.

  The ten dogs which are believed to include huskies, labradors and collies were then removed from the shelter and nine were taken to a veterinary clinic in Cloverhill.

  All of the dogs are now understood to be healthy and are ready to be re-homed. Five are currently in the ISPCA dog shelter in Longford.

  One of the dogs was deemed to be aggressive and was assessed by an animal behaviour specialist but is now suitable for re-homing.

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly told TheJournal.ie that the dogs were not in a bad condition when they were were found but that it is “completely unacceptable” that they were left alone:

  The dogs were actually in good condition but they were slightly dehydrated and they were hungry. There is absolutely no truth the story that’s being reported that one of them was found with a wire around its neck.

  “They were however left without food and water which is completely unacceptable,” he said.

  Kelly added that they are “investigating the sequence of events” that led to the dogs being left left unattended and expected to complete the investigation in the coming days.

  All local authorities are required to provide services for the care of dogs and Roscommon County Council pays the ISPCA a yearly fee to run the shelter and to employ a dog warden



Sheep farmers shot dogs dead

Irish Examiner, 20/02/ 2015

Sheep farmers shot dead hunting dogs after lambs were slaughtered. The dogs, including beagles and cross-breeds, had been on a supervised hunt in Co Clare.

  But eight dogs broke away from the pack and attacked sheep on two separate farms in Broadford.

  The county’s dog warden Frankie Coote said yesterday the dogs killed two sheep and injured several more.

  But more would possibly have been slaughtered, only for the alertness of farmers. He said the farmers, who notifiied the authorities, were acting within their rights. The lambing season is currently at its peak.

  Mr Coote said: “More than likely a deer brought them through the land and once they came on the young lambs, that was it.

  “Even supervised, if they come on a deer, it can bring them anywhere. That’s what we believe happened. There are a lot of deer in that area.

  Mr Coote said the owner of the dogs had been identified. “The owner was with the dogs when they lost the pack. This is unusual for hunting dogs to do but all dogs will do it,” he explained.

  “There were two farms. One was alerted and he went to his farm. Four of the dogs were shot while attacking the sheep.

  “Then they went up to check the neighbour’s farm and there were four more dogs up there, attacking sheep.”

The dog warden said the attacks has long-term consequences for farmers. “All of those sheep were ready to lamb. You don’t know now whether they’ll have dead lambs or other problems.”

  The incidents have been reported to gardaí.

  “It’s completely legal to shoot dogs once livestock has been attacked, once the landowner notifies the dog warden or the gardaí immediately. They contacted me and I went down and removed the carcasses. I’m now in the process of meeting the owner.”

  Mr Coote said he had never previously came across such a large number of dogs being shot together.

“This is the most, although I’ve seen dogs shot that did a lot more damage. The reason there wasn’t more damage was the farmers had been alerted and came on them. Otherwise the dogs would have slaughtered what was there. There is no winners in this,” he reflected.



ISPCA worker is fired after leaving dogs without food

The ISPCA has confirmed that a member of staff has been dismissed after 10 dogs were left without food or water over a bank holiday weekend.

Irish Independent, 06/11/2014

The staff member was dismissed for gross misconduct, chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly said.

  The action followed an investigation by the society into the incident at Roscommon Dog Pound over two days of the August Bank Holiday period. The ISPCA has held the contract for managing the pound for Roscommon County Council for the last 27 years.

  A preliminary investigation was carried out after a member of the public alerted gardai to the situation at the pound in Rockfield, Donamon, on Monday August 4. Gardai and vets removed the 10 dogs from the shelter.

  The pound's members of staff were initially suspended by the ISPCA pending a full investigation into allegations that the animals had been left without food or water for 48 hours.

  Yesterday Dr Kelly confirmed that the incident had been fully investigated and one staff member had been dismissed. He also revealed that, as a result of the incident, the county council had accepted the society's offer to terminate its long-standing contract.

  "We took full responsibility for the incident that occurred over the bank holiday weekend in August and we took decisive action and we carried out a full investigation. As a result of that investigation a member of staff was dismissed for gross misconduct.

  "It was part of a review of services generally, but really the incident in August drove us to offer to terminate the contract and Roscommon gracefully accepted our decision", he said.

Dr Kelly explained that he felt the best thing to do after the incident at the Roscommon facility was for the charity to withdraw from its involvement there.

  He stressed that the decision to terminate the contract was driven by the ISPCA and it would not be bidding for the new one.

  Roscommon County Council is now re-advertising the contract for the operation of the county dog pound. Tenders are currently being invited for the operation of the service and a site visit to view the facilities at Rockfield will be held on November 11.

  Tenders have to be returned to the council by November 20.



Farmer anger after fox-hunting hounds killed by train

Irish Independent, 13/01/2014

FARMERS against fox hunting have expressed "extreme concern" over a pack of hounds wandering onto a railway track during a hunt at the weekend where several dogs were killed by a passing train.

  The farmers' group said it saw the incident as "yet further evidence of the havoc wrought by fox hunts" which it described as "an absolute menace to farmers and their livelihoods".

Iarnrod Eireann has confirmed that the 14.50 train from Waterford to Dublin's Heuston station hit a pack of hounds on the track at Mullinavat, Co Kilkenny, just after 3pm on Saturday.

  A spokeswoman said the rail company had not been contacted prior to the fox hunt. The train ploughed into the pack of dogs killing a number of them.


DANGEROUS

She said if they had been contacted they could have given the train timetable for the area but she also stressed that it was "very dangerous for people or animals to be on the track with trains passing at high speed".

  In most areas the track was protected by fences or hedges and to be on the track was trespassing, she added.

  Chairman of the Kilkenny foxhounds, Ned Morris, said that he was away on Saturday and "only came back, so I don't know how many dogs were killed".

  He said that the group would normally contact Iarnrod Eireann prior to hunting. The company would be good about "slowing down trains and that kind of thing" when hunts were being held, he said.

  "Dogs getting killed would be a kind of freak thing now," he added.

The Association of Hunt Saboteurs disagreed and condemned the failure of the hunters to control the pack of hounds and protect their welfare.

  "The death of hounds while hunting is not an isolated incident. Accidents in the past have involved road accidents, other train accidents and deaths of other animals caused by hounds out of control," said a spokesman.

The Farmers Against Fox-hunting and Trespass group said it believed hunting should be banned.

  "Our main objection is the damage they cause to farm property.

  "They ride through fields of crops, ripping them up and scattering or killing livestock, knocking fencing and, as frequently happens, killing family pets," the group said.



Foxhounds killed in collision with train; group calls for prosecutions

BreakingNews.ie, 12/01/2014

The Irish Council Against Blood Sports has called on Iarnród Éireann to prosecute a Kilkenny hunt for trespass after hounds were killed in a collision with the Dublin to Waterford train.

  The hounds were part of a pack taking part in a hunt outside Mullinavat in Co Kilkenny yesterday, when the collision occurred.

  A number of hounds were killed and there was a small amount of damage to the train.

  Aideen Yourell of the Irish Council Against Blood Sports accused fox hunters generally of an "arrogant and cavalier attitude to trespass onto other people’s property, be it private land, roads and railway tracks".

  She called for a ban on foxhunting, saying it "clearly causes a risk to rail and road users. If they want to ride out in the countryside, they should change to drag hunting, where no live quarry is chased and where the route is pre-planned in conjunction with landowners’ wishes."

  Richard Power of the Hunting Association of Ireland said that although he could not speak to the incident in question, in general terms he said that landowners are always notified of upcoming events.

  "Landowners would all be informed and would know that there would be a hunt in their area," he said. "This is standard practice.

  "Indeed, permission would be sought from them regarding access to their land."

The name of the group whose hounds were killed is not known at this stage.



Foxhounds killed after being hit by Iarnród Éireann train

Journal.ie, 12/01/2014

A number of foxhounds were killed yesterday after an Iarnród Éireann train hit the dogs who had strayed onto the railway track.

  It is believed the dogs were taking part in a hunt along the railway tracks.


Waterford to Dublin train

A spokesperson for Iarnród Éireann confirmed to TheJournal.ie that a pack of hounds that were on the railway line just outside Mullinavat County Kilkenny were struck by the 14.50pm train from Waterford to Dublin train.

  They also confirmed that a number of dogs were killed and the train suffered a small amount of damage.

  The incident also caused the train to be delayed for a period of time.

  “We would advise that no one should cross the railway line where there is not a designated crossing,” said the spokesperson, adding “it is extremely dangerous”.


No prior notification

She also added that no hunt group had given any prior notification that a hunt was taking place and that they would be crossing the line. “There were no prior arrangements made with Iarnród Eireann,” she said.

  The Association of Hunt Saboteurs Ireland said they “wholeheartedly condemn the failure of the hunters to control the pack of hounds and to protect their welfare. The death of hounds while hunting is not an isolated incident, accidents in the past have involved road accidents, other train accidents and deaths of other animals caused by hounds out of control,” said their spokesperson.


Fox hunting

  “This is further proof that hunting with hounds is a danger to both animals and humans. Hunt hounds cannot realistically be controlled by hunt masters once they are on the scent of another animal. Hunting must be banned in this country for the welfare of all animals,” they added.

The name of the fox hunt group involved in this incident has yet to be verified. Hunt groups that operate hunts in the area have stated that they are not aware of any incident involving their group.



Puppies in Roscommon mutilated for “cosmetic reasons”

Shannon Side, 08/04/2014

The ISPCA is to take action against a dog owner in Roscommon after an Inspector called to a property in the county last week and found puppies whose tails had been docked.

  The litter of puppies was discovered after a call made to the charity’s National Animal Cruelty Helpline.

The docking of puppies tails, and the removal of dew claws by lay-person is outlawed under the new Animal Health and Welfare Act and carries significant fines.

  The ISPCA says the mutilation of young pups for no good reason will no longer be tolerated, and we need to get away from the attitude that some breeds don’t look right with long tails.

  Speaking on the Let’s Talk programme this afternoon, Dr Andrew Kelly, who is the new Chief Executive of the ISPCA says they are determined to enforce the new welfare act for animals, and will be taking action where they see it is necessary.



Seven puppies found dumped in bog

Athlone Advertiser. 01/08/2014

The ASPCA have reported that seven puppies have been found dumped in a bog in the same location a number of puppies were found a year ago.

  The Athlone Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals were called to a bog road at Derrycahill, Ballyforan, Co Roscommon at around 9.30pm on Wednesday evening, after two cyclists reported hearing whimpering at a place where people frequently dump household rubbish.

  Knowing that abandoned pups would not survive the night, members of the ASPCA were on the scene as quickly as possible.

  “We got our wellingtons and flashlights out and drove as quick as we could as it was getting dark on a wet evening. After carefully searching through overgrown briars and broken glass we started finding pups one by one. We had got five into the safety of a warm blanket and were ready to go, when we heard more crying in the distance and finally found two more huddled up together in the dark with our flashlights,” explained Billy Gallagher of ASPCA.

  The ASPCA is asking that if any member of the public from this area knows of anyone who had one or two recently pregnant collie-type dogs to call them at (087 ) 9925052 or send a private message via their Facebook page - Athlone SPCA.

  “All information will be handled completely confidentially. This is the second year that pups were dumped in this exact same location,” said Billy.

“Abandoning animals is not only cruel but it is a criminal offence. When these pups are old enough we will try and get good homes for them. Please contact us if you can give one of these pups a forever home.”



Collie cuties DUMPED – along the same road where pups of the same breed were rescued by the Athlone SPCA last year

Evoke.ie, 31/07/2014

An animal welfare group was yesterday on the trail of an owner who abandoned seven pups along a bog road in the West.

  The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said it was the second year in a row that pups of the same breed were found in exactly the same spot.

  ‘We’ve got a very good lead about a dog owner not too far from where we found the pups and we’ll be visiting that person over the next day or so,’ said Billy Gallagher of the Athlone SPCA.

  A couple on a late-evening cycle along the bog road at Derrycahill, Ballyforan, Co. Roscommon alerted Billy after hearing whimpering from a location often used to illegally dump refuse.

  After searching the scene, Mr Gallagher discovered the pups. ‘They’d just been left there by the owner… Last year in exactly the same spot we found two pups of the same cross-breed – a Collie-cross – and one was already dead. I’d be pretty sure it’s the same person involved,’ he said.

  Now the Athlone SPCA plans to visit the person identified to them and ask about the abandoned pups.



Dogs left for days without food and water in ISPCA run shelter

The charity say they have suspended two staff members in the Roscommon shelter.

Journal.ie, 10/08/2014

THE ISPCA HAS suspended two staff members after 10 dogs at a Roscommon dog shelter were left without food and water for a number of days.

  The dogs were left abandoned for at least the August bank holiday weekend and were found after members of the public contacted gardaí expressing concern for the animals’ welfare.

  The shelter is run by the ISPCA and is part funded by Roscommon County Council with the animal welfare charity saying that they are treating the incident “extremely seriously”.

  Gardaí and a council employee entered the shelter last Monday after they were alerted by a member of the public that it was left unattended.

  The concerned person is understood to have initially noticed that the shelter was closed the week previously.

  The ten dogs which are believed to include huskies, labradors and collies were then removed from the shelter and nine were taken to a veterinary clinic in Cloverhill.

  All of the dogs are now understood to be healthy and are ready to be re-homed. Five are currently in the ISPCA dog shelter in Longford.

  One of the dogs was deemed to be aggressive and was assessed by an animal behaviour specialist but is now suitable for re-homing.

  The ISPCA’s chief executive Dr Andrew Kelly told TheJournal.ie that the dogs were not in a bad condition when they were were found but that it is “completely unacceptable” that they were left alone:

  The dogs were actually in good condition but they were slightly dehydrated and they were hungry. There is absolutely no truth the story that’s being reported that one of them was found with a wire around its neck.

  “They were however left without food and water which is completely unacceptable,” he said.

Kelly added that they are “investigating the sequence of events” that led to the dogs being left left unattended and expected to complete the investigation in the coming days.

  All local authorities are required to provide services for the care of dogs and Roscommon County Council pays the ISPCA a yearly fee to run the shelter and to employ a dog warden.



DEAD DOGS FOUND AT HOME OF DONEGAL MAN IN ANIMAL CRUELTY CASE

Roscommon Herald, 19/02/2014

A Donegal man has been banned from keeping dogs for 10 years after pleading guilty to seven counts of cruelty to the animals.

  George Cavanagh, of Carrowhugh, Greencastle, Co. Donegal was convicted at Donegal District Court.

  Eighteen dogs were found living in poor conditions at his property and ISPCA inspectors also found the decomposing and unburied carcasses of three other dogs.

The 77-year-old, who refused to give up his dogs voluntarily, was also fined €500.



Little Thor suffers in ‘one of the most appalling cases of animal cruelty’

Irish Examiner, 03/04/2013

Vets fear this little dog suffered devastating injuries after being used as bait in an illegal dog fight.  see more

 


'Evil' Andrew Stewart jailed for setting fire to family dog Cody

Belfast Telegraph, 07/10/2014

An "evil" man who set fire to a family's pet dog has been sentenced to 10 months in jail.  see more

 

Man jailed for setting dog on fire

Andrew Stewart, who doused border collie in diesel, to spend 10 months in jail over case that shocked Northern Ireland

Guardian, 07/10/2014  see more 



Man jailed for setting fire to family dog which had to be put down two weeks after 'evil' attack

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

  • Andrew Richard Stewart, 23, doused Cody in fuel before setting her alight

  • The border collie, three, was so badly burned that her ribs were visible

  • Had to be put down two weeks later after being told she would not recover

  • 70 campaigners applauded as Stewart was jailed at Belfast Crown Court

  • Recorder said it was an 'appalling, vile act' on a 'much-loved' family pet  

  • Cody's relieved owner Nicola Agnew said the family could now have closure

  • Co-defendant Jamie Downey, 23, also jailed for perverting course of justice

Mail, 07/10/2014
see more




Man caught torturing flatmate’s puppy on iPad recording fined €100

Irish Examiner, 26/09/2014

A woman became suspicious that her flatmate was injuring her puppy so she set up her iPad to record him.

  Kevin Louin’s housemate hid her iPad in the kitchen of the house they shared with others. Her pup had sustained a number of unexplained injuries and she began to suspect Louin was hurting the dog on purpose.

  On January 19, she hid her iPad and left the house for a short while. When she returned, she watched footage showing Louin pulling the puppy from the dog bed in the kitchen and sitting on the six-month-old pup, causing her to yelp in pain.

  She called the gardaí and two gardaí from Tallaght arrived at the house at Alderwood Avenue, Tallaght. In Tallaght District Court yesterday, Sergeant Bernard Jones said that, on that date, the dog had a broken paw and this was evident from the footage. Louin also tried to strangle the dog.

  Louin, aged 32, with an address at Exchange Hall, Belgard Square, Tallaght, pleaded guilty to beating, kicking, torturing, and terrifying the pup.

  Sgt Jones said Louin later came to Tallaght Garda Station and was shown the iPad video. He admitted that he tried to sit on the puppy and tried to strangle her.

  Louin, who represented himself, also gave a voluntary cautioned statement in which he admitted kicking the dog on several occasions — even ones that the owner of the dog had not known about.

  Sgt Jones said Louin, who is originally from France, had no previous convictions. He said Louin moved out after the incident.

  Judge Lindsay fined him €100.



Hurt dog rescued and man held in badger baiting raid

Irish Times, 03/02/2012

THE ULSTER Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA) has urged the public to be vigilant against badger-baiting after a man was arrested and a badly injured dog rescued near Banbridge, Co Down.

  David Wilson of the USPCA said the severe facial injuries to the dog, a Patterdale terrier, were consistent with the animal having been involved in a fight with a badger.

  The man (58) was arrested by PSNI officers co-operating with USPCA inspectors on Wednesday night. It was part of a UK-wide crackdown on badger baiting called Operation Meles.

  The terrier was rescued from a house in Gilford near Banbridge. A vehicle was also seized. The man was released yesterday “pending further inquiries”.

  A senior police officer said: “I have investigated a number of animal cruelty cases and the injuries sustained by this dog are some of the worst I have seen.”

  In follow-up searches on nearby premises yesterday morning, four similar terrier-type dogs were recovered and taken into the care of the USPCA. Several implements, such as long-handle spades suitable for digging up badger setts and boxes to hold badgers, were also seized.

  Badger-baiting involves setting dogs against badgers. It often involves betting, while breeding and selling the terriers is also a business.

  Mr Wilson said the seizures in Co Down were part of an intelligence-led operation. Throughout the island, he added, it was estimated that badger baiting was “costing the lives of thousands of Irish badgers” each year.

  He said those involved did not go near the badgers in the summer when they were breeding but that this was the season for digging them out of setts to prepare them for organised badger-baiting at “very secret venues”.

  Mr Wilson asked for people, particularly farmers and others living in rural areas, to be watchful for people who might be involved in “this medieval pastime”.

  There was particular suspicious activity to look out for. “You are looking for a van or a vehicle with trailers; you are looking for dogs; you are looking for guys carrying long-handled spades.”



Father and sons plead guilty to dog fighting charges

NewsLetter, 14/01/2014

A father and two sons from east Belfast have pleaded guilty to charges linked to animal cruelty and animal fighting.

  Jeremiah Kirkwood (43) and his sons Christopher (23) and Wayne (20), who are all from Island Street, appeared in the dock of Belfast Crown Court on Tuesday.

  All three originally faced a total of 15 charges, but after pleading guilty to three charges each, the remaining counts were left on the books.

  Each of the three men admitted to causing unnecessary suffering to four terrier cross puppies on dates between November 1 and November 28, 2011.

  They also pleaded guilty to possession of items for use in connection with an animal fight, namely a CD7 battery pack, handheld lamps, a green dog harness and an animal trap. The father and two sons also admitted a charge of keeping or training animals for an animal fight on dates between July 10 and November 28, 2011.

  The final charge relates to four bull lurcher dogs.

  A co-accused, 19-year old Jamie Edward Morrow from McAllister Court in Belfast, originally faced three charges. Two of these were left on the books after he admitted a charge of keeping or training an animal for a fight, namely a whippet cross Staffordshire bull terrier, on November 27.

  After the guilty pleas were entered, Judge Donna McColgan ordered that pre-sentence reports be prepared for all four men. The Judge agreed to release them on continued bail but said: “this is no indication of the likely outcome of the case”, which will be heard before the same court on February 21.

  Also appearing in the dock of the same court was Catherine Kirkwood from Island Street in Belfast.

  Wife of Jeremiah and mother of Wayne and Christopher, the 43-year old originally faced a total of 15 charges linked to animal cruelty and animal fighting.

  A jury was sworn in to hear the case, but a prosecutor told the Judge and jury that the Crown would be offering no evidence against her.

  Judge McColgan directed the jury to find Catherine Kirkwood not guilty of all the charges against her and when they were discharged, Kirkwood was told she was free to go.



Man arrested after dog killed in Dublin field yesterday afternoon

The animal was found dead at the grounds of Clonliffe College.

Journal.ie, 20/08/2014

A MAN WAS arrested after a small dog was killed yesterday afternoon at the grounds of Clonliffe College in Dublin.

  Gardaí and members of the Dublin Society of Cruelty to Animals were called to a football field at the grounds near to Croke Park in Drumcondra.

  There they found a small terrier that had apparently been killed at the scene.

  The DSPCA says that it is unclear whether the man was the owner of the dog or had come upon it at the scene.

  They say that the dog had received severe injuries from which it did not recover. The animal was taken away to a veterinary practice in UCD where a post-mortem will be carried out.

  Gardaí have confirmed that a 43-year-old man was arrested following the incident and was taken to Mountjoy Garda Station where he was questioned. He was later released without charge with a file to be sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions.

  A DSPCA spokesperson told TheJournal.ie that one of the regular problems with securing convictions in cases of animal cruelty is a lack of witnesses or witnesses that are willing to come forward.

  It is believed that there were a number of people in the vicinity of the Clonliffe College area who may have seen what happened yesterday.

  The DSPCA say that any witnesses to this or any other incident can contact them in confidence at cruelty@dspca.ie.



‘In my 23 years as a dog warden, I’ve never seen such a horrendous act of animal cruelty’

The German Shepherd had to be put down. Warning: Images are graphic.

Journal.ie, 25/08/2014

see more 


Dumped dog seeks rehabilitation at dog shelter

Kilkenny Advertiser, 19/02/2010

In a week where a local man was jailed for cruelty to animals, the Carlow Kilkenny Dog Shelter was presented with yet another case of horrifying animal cruelty.

  A young Lurcher dog was picked up in Paulstown where the badly injured dog was wandering aimlessly, and given to the Carlow- Kilkenny Dog Shelter.

  Michael Morrissey of the dog shelter told the Kilkenny Advertiser that this was yet another case of horrendous animal cruelty and neglect.

  “This dog has a huge open bleeding wound on his rear shank and he has several other injuries around his body some of which are recent and others that were older injuries. It is a terrible case of utter neglect and cruelty. Somebody either hurt this dog or didn’t look after him. It’s hard to know what happened.”

The dog has since been taken in by the shelter and has been visited by the vet who believes he can make a good recovery.

“We hope that he will recover fully with the right care. We will then assess him and his temperament and see if he is suitable for re-homing. We already think that he will be as he seems to be a lovely gentle dog. We are asking anyone that might be looking for a dog to contact the dog shelter and see what we have on offer before looking elsewhere. We have lots of animals that are in need of good homes,” he added.

Every day the dog shelter deals with cases such as this or simply with animals that are not wanted by their owners anymore. They are asking the public to be responsible for their own pets.

  “Dog wardens seem to have a bad name but if only people knew what we had to deal with every day. People dump their animals when they don’t want them and we have to pick up the pieces. We get quite a number of dogs like the Lurcher that we have this week. This is not a one-off case,” said Mr Morrissey.

The Lurcher is currently recuperating with antibiotics, on a sheepskin rug close to a radiator - if anyone is interested in adopting a dog, please call the dog shelter on 059 9726785.



Charity worker fined €250 after starved dogs and animal skulls found

Journal.ie, 14/07/2014

WARNING: This article contains some graphic images. see more


Donegal woman fined after abandoning dog without food or water

Breaking News.ie, 21/09/2015

A woman from Co Donegal has been banned from keeping animals for four years, after she abandoned a dog with no food or water.

Natalie Mc Granaghan was also fined €200 at Letterkenny District Court earlier today.

ISPCA inspectors called to a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co Donegal after reports that a terrier dog was abandoned there.

Ms Mc Granaghan was traced to her mother's home and initially claimed that the dog had been sold before admitting it hadn't.

The dog, called Megan, was in a very poor state when found but has since made a full recovery and has been re-homed.

ISPCA inspector Kevin McGinley said: "The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed.

"This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan.

"We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts."




Animal welfare centre convicted of ill-treating dogs is funded by the State

Irish Mirror, 04/08/2014

East Galway Animal Rescue has been receiving grand aid from Department of Agriculture since 2003

  An animal welfare sanctuary convicted of ill-treating dogs has been receiving State funding for the last ten years, it has emerged.

The founder of the East Galway Animal Rescue, Sarah Gunter of Kylebrack, Loughrea, pleaded guilty last month to eight charges of ill-treating a variety of dogs.

  The sanctuary has been receiving grant aid from the Department of Agriculture since 2003 and most recently was awarded funding of €4,000 in 2012.

  Figures for 2013 and the current year are not to hand.

  There are no restrictions on a person operating a voluntary dog pound and no requirement to be registered.

  East Galway Animal Rescue primarily deals with bull breeds of dogs, but also deals with other breeds as well as cats.

  The dogs that were ill-treated included Staffordshire bull terriers, a Rotweiler, a pit bull terrier, a Dogue de Bordeaux and a mixed breed.

  One of the dogs belonged to Ms Gunter and she told Loughrea District Court that what had occurred was “an error of judgment” on her part.

  Ms Gunter insisted that she would never hurt an animal.  

  The court heard that gardai were contacted by the Galway Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in July of last year to go to the sanctuary in Kylebrack where one dog was running freely and seven others were in a derelict farm building.

The dogs were found to be in an emaciated condition when removed from the property and examined by a vet.

  The court heard that Sarah Gunter had operated the East Galway Animal Rescue for the past 17 years and her whole life revolved around the animals.

  Her solicitor said that kennels at the Rescue were undergoing repairs at the time and, after the dogs came down with diarrhoea and intestinal problems, she had separated them from the other animals.

  The East Galway Animal Rescue was reliant on donations from members of the public and Ms Gunter made no money from operating it. Two random inspections carried out since had not shown any problems.

  Vet James Smith said that the dogs were emaciated when he examined them the day after they had been taken from the Rescue. He found no evidence that the animals had been suffering from diarrhoea as claimed by Ms Gunter.

Judge William Hamill imposed a fine of €250 along with €600 expenses and said that Ms Gunter’s own dog could be returned to her.



Two puppies beaten and thrown over 10-foot wall in PortlaoiseThe two eight-week-old pups had been abandoned behind the high wall for about four days, leaving them severely dehydrated.

Journal.ie, 05/06/2013

TWO EIGHT-WEEK-OLD puppies are recovering at a veterinary surgery in Co Laois after they were discovered on Monday close to death in a housing estate in Portlaoise.

  The two young pups were found by local residents and taken to the vets by volunteers from the charity Cara Rescue Dogs.

  Speaking to TheJournal.ie, Lorraine McEvoy of Cara Rescue said that they were both suffering from dehydration, having been left in the sun with no water for a long period of time.

  “The little girl [above], it looks like her face has been chewed at by wildlife, maybe a rat or a possibly a crow pecked away at her while she was lying there,” she said. “She’s also blind and we don’t know if that’s because of the trauma or something else but she has bruising around her eye, lots of burst blood vessels.”

  “The boy was crying, in a lot of pain and went unconscious on the way over to the vets so the volunteer thought he was dead, I mean they’re both just in tatters.”

She said the puppies, named Alfie and Lexi, could hardly walk and when they did it was “just in small circles”. The vet has also said that Lexi, the female, has a heart murmur which could significantly shorten her life span.

  It is thought that a local resident owned the pups and no longer wanted them so disposed of them behind the high wall in a ditch area that leads to a railway track. McEvoy said she thinks they had been there for about four days.

  She said that it is thought that the dogs were beaten before being abandoned and has been told by the vet that Alfie, the male pup [pictured above], “screams when they go to pick him up and flinches like he doesn’t want to be touched”.

Despite this, and Lexi’s heart condition, McEvoy said the charity will find them a home and has already arranged a foster placement for them.

  “I’ll find them a home, even the little girl,” she said. “If she can have any quality of life and enjoy a cuddle, enjoy her food, we’ll give her roast chicken for the rest of her life but we’re going to save her.”

One thing is for sure, this duo is not likely to be separated as Lexi has taken to following her brother around everywhere, even though she can’t see him.

“This was just blatent cruelty that what drives me mad is that there’s just no reason for it”, McEvoy added.



RTE, 13/02/2,013

Over 140 dogs have been recovered from a property in a rural part of Co Leitrim.  The ISPCA said the dogs were being kept in deplorable conditions and all have since been removed.

The Leitrim County Veterinary Officer, James Madden, described the situation as an extreme case of "dog hoarding".



Man on sex with alsatian charge sent forward for trial

Irish Independent, 14/07/2011

A 57-year-old man appeared in court in Limerick today on one count of buggery with a German Shepherd dog connected with the suspicious death of a woman.S

  Sean McDonnell, of Churchill Meadows, Raheen, Limerick was sent forward for trial at the Circuit Court in relation to the incident.

  Mother-of-four Carol Hickey (43) died on October 7 2008 when she became unwell at a house in Patrickswell.

  McDonnell is charged with buggery of the animal at 26 Laurel Park, Patrickswell, Co Limerick on October 7 2008.

  A garda investigation following Mrs Hickey’s death resulted in the arrest and charging of the accused man.

  He was today served with the Book of Evidence in the case at Limerick District Court and sent forward for trial at the next sitting of the Circuit Court later this year.

Mrs Hickey was from Galbally, Co Limerick where she was the secretary of the local community association.



140 dogs saved in biggest canine rescue in State history.
Journal.ie, 12/02/2013
More than 140 dogs were rescued from a property in rural Leitrim, where they were living “in deplorable conditions”.
see more


Bus driver avoids prison in bestiality case

Limerick Post, 19/12/2012

A BUS driver has been given a three-year suspended sentence in a buggery case described by Circuit Court Judge Carroll Moran as “socially repugnant – even in these tolerant times”.

  Sean McDonnell (58) of Churchill Meadows, Raheen, was convicted of the charge of buggery with an Alsatian on October 7, 2008 after a woman was “found in an unresponsive state” after she had sex with a dog owned by Mr McDonnell. The mother of three was pronounced dead in hospital later that night.

  Limerick Circuit Court heard that the father of three had posted messages regarding bestiality on the internet through which he encountered the woman. A laptop computer owned by Mr McDonnell was found to have accessed a bestiality website with over 1.5million hits in a five month period. This, Judge Carroll Moran said, was a “shocking” aggravating factor in the case.

  When the woman became unresponsive during the sexual activity, Mr McDonnell called the emergency services. Dr Aine Moran pronounced the woman dead at the Mid Western Regional hospital but a post-mortem carried out by Dr Maria Cassidy was unable to determine an exact cause of death.

  Mr McDonnell voluntarily went to Roxboro Garda Station in April, 2009 and his home was searched and a German Shepherd was found. Three computers and technical analysis of mobile phone contacts also formed part of the State’s case and the court was told that Mr McDonnell’s admissions were helpful to the prosecution. Analysis carried out by animal genetic scientists showed that fluids and semen matched the DNA of Mr McDonnell’s dog.

  Defending counsel Isobel Kennedy SC, said that the woman “sought out the activity” and since her death, Mr McDonnell was in the “unenviable position of having to plead guilty as the principal offender”. Judge Moran said the guilty party, who is a separated father, had been employed as a bus driver but lost his job because of the adverse publicity and moved to England where he sought counselling from The Priory Clinic.  However, due to financial difficulties, he was unable to avail of their treatment and was now embarking upon “long-term counselling” from an independent provider.

  The court previously heard that Mr McDonnell’s name was added to the register of sex offenders’ and any person on the register is disqualified from having a haulage licence for a vehicle which carries more than nine people. This, the judge said, along with the “enormous adverse publicity”, was severe punishment for the accused.

  During the sentencing hearing last week, Judge Carroll Moran said that even in these “tolerant times”, acts of bestiality were considered “socially repugnant”.   The defendant could have received anything up to life imprisonment but Judge Moran said it was a “very tragic case in which a woman died” and the outcome of the events  could not have been foreseen.

Amid emotional scenes, he was sentenced to three years in prison, suspended for a period of three years. His name was added to the sex offenders’ register for a period of five years. The court is to be provided with quarterly updates on his continuing counselling for the period of the suspended sentence.




Rescued: blind 'baby machine' boxer dog entombed in hole to die

Belfast Telegraph, 06/05/2014

A blind boxer dog thrown down a concrete hole and left to her fate had been used as a "breeding machine", according to the founder of an animal rescue centre.

  The dog was discovered by Cara Bideau as she played near her home in the Waterside area of Londonderry.

  The six-year-old spotted the animal trapped down the concrete hole in waste ground.  Little Cara ran home and told her father Kenny, who rescued the distressed animal.

  Mr Bideau said he was shocked by the level of obvious cruelty.

"Cara came home and said a pup had fallen down a manhole, but when I went with her back to where the dog was I could see that wasn't the case at all," he said.

"This was an adult dog that was left to starve to death down this concrete hole.

"A wooden pallet had been placed over the hole and rocks put on top to keep it there, so that the poor dog couldn't get out.

"I was even more shocked when I freed the dog to see how her ribs were sticking out, so it had been quite a while since she had eaten, and then to top it off, we found out she was blind. It is beyond my understanding how anyone could be this callous.

"We are a family of animal lovers and have a dog ourselves, so we took her home with us and gave her a tin of food, which she gulped down in under 15 seconds.

"We kept her at home that night and let her sleep on the sofa because she was clearly exhausted and distressed. In fact, my 15-year-old son Ethan slept on the other sofa to help her settle before we contacted the Rainbow Centre.

"We would consider fostering the poor dog until a permanent home can be found for her. We reckon she deserves to be shown some love after what she has been through, and she is very gentle and affectionate."

Helen Davis from the Rainbow Rehoming Centre took the dog to a vet, who believes the animal was used for extensive breeding and then discarded when she was no longer useful.

  Ms Davis added: "The vet has found evidence that this dog was bred and bred and bred until she could no longer produce pups.

"She is emaciated so we can only guess how long she had been left in this concrete grave and left to starve to death.

"Just recently I gave evidence at an animal cruelty court case in Northern Ireland where the judge told a woman it was the worst case of animal cruelty he had ever seen, but then he let her walk free from court with a suspended sentence.

"That is sending out the wrong message – in my opinion people need to be spending time behind bars for behaviour like this."


"I have lost count of the number of times we have come across instances like this boxer dog where animals have been used to churn out pups for sale by people who run puppy farms, and they are getting away with it. Thousands of people took to the streets of Belfast a couple of weeks ago to show how sickened they are by animal cruelty and it was heartening to see."

Helen Davis from the Rainbow Rehoming Centre



Dog used as fighting bait left savaged

Drogheda Independent, 05/01/2011

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn was believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of the worst cases the organisation had seen this year.

  They reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck. The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals. Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher had been named Lucky as he was lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

DAR were also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there were many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.



ANIMAL USED AS BAIT FOR DOG FIGHTING

Drogheda Independent, 02/06/2010

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn is believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal last week, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of hte worst cases the organisation has seen this year.

  They have reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene last Wednesday, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck.

  The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals.

  Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher has been named Lucky as he is lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

  Drogheda Animal Rescue is urgently seeking donations to help pay for Lucky's veterinarian care and his long road to recovery.

  DAR are also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there are have been many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.

  For further information or to make a donation contact Drogheda Animal Rescue on 9832418 or visit their website at www.dar.ie.



Tortured dog Pippa seeking a new home

Drogheda Independent, 20/05/2005

DROGHEDA’s Animal Rescue Centre (ARC) is hoping for a happy ending to a tale of terrible animal cruelty.

  They are looking for a new home for Pippa, a springer spaniel who was subjected to systematic torture, burned by hot oil deliberately poured on her head.

  ‘It’s a horrible case, one of the worst we have seen in some time,’ said Lisa Martinez of the Drogheda Animal Rescue Centre. ‘We got a call from a distressed woman who was so appalled by the condition of the dog, she took it straight away to the Garda Station and wouldn't leave until something was sorted out.’

Pippa was picked up wandering around the town at the end of March with horrific injuries. When the ARC volunteers got to the Garda station they found a sorry sight.

  ‘Pippa was lice ridden, to such an extent that they could be seen crawling around her fur. She was just skin and bone with her ribs sticking out and large sores on her backside from spending extensive time sitting on a concrete floor. Worst of all were the large open wounds on her head,’ said Lisa.

At first the ARC thought Pippa had been used for dog fighting but a vet’s report revealed

the truth.

  ‘She said the wounds were burns, most likely caused by deliberately pouring a hot liquid such as oil on her head.’

Pippa’s condition was immediately reported to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals who are investigating the case.

  Despite her ill treatment Pippa is very friendly and affectionate. At the moment she is being ‘fostered’ by ARC volunteer Paula Loughlin who is nursing the animal back to health at her home in Mornington.

  ‘We are looking for a new home for Pippa, who is almost fully recovered,’ said Lisa. Before she goes to new owners Pippa will be neutered and fully vaccinated.

They found a new home this month for another badly mistreated dog. Jewel is an English Pointer who was found, half starved with much of her fur missing and bloody sores covering her body, in Julianstown last December.

  A family in Scotland who keep pointers heard about Jewel’s sorry tale. When they saw the dramatic before and after photos of her, they were determined to give her a home, said Lisa. Jewel went to Scotland two weeks ago.

  If you are interested in providing Pippa with the good home she deserves and needs, please contact Drogheda Animal Rescue Centre at 041-9832418.



Man kept 18 dogs in a jeep and shed with no access to waterThe man was banned from keeping dogs for ten years.

The Journal.ie, 20/02/2014

A DONEGAL MAN has been banned from keeping dogs for ten years after he pled guilty to a number of counts of animal cruelty yesterday.

  77-year-old George Cavanagh, with an address at Carrowhugh, Greencastle, Co. Donegal pled guilty to seven counts of cruelty at Carndonagh District Court.

  At that time, ISPCA Officer Kevin McGinley and Gardai inspected Mr. Cavanagh’s home place and an out-farm where they found 18 dogs living in poor conditions.

  Some were tied on short tethers and others confined in sheds and a stationary jeep with inadequate ventilation.

  Many were deprived access to water and suitable shelter and bedding.

  As well as the living conditions of the dogs, the gardaí and inspectors discovered the decomposing and unburied carcasses of three other dogs.

  The court heard how Inspector McGinley had tried to persuade Mr Cavanagh to voluntarily surrender the majority of the dogs to the care of the ISPCA, but that he refused to cooperate.

  Judge Paul Kelly banned Mr. Cavanagh from keeping dogs for ten years and fined him a total of €500. He also ordered that Mr. Cavanagh pay costs of €400 to a vet that accompanied the Gardai and ISPCA on an inspection.

  The vet, Stuart Johnston, requested that his fee be paid to the ISPCA.

  Speaking after the ruling, ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley said

“This case has taken a long time to be finalized and I am pleased that the conclusion was successful. The ban will prevent a similar situation arising again for the foreseeable future”.



An ISPCA inspector and gardaí found two emaciated boxer dogs at the woman’s house a year ago.

The Journal.ie, 06/02/2014

A DONEGAL WOMAN has been convicted of animal cruelty and told that she cannot keep dogs for two years.

The ISPCA said that the Donegal woman was convicted of animal cruelty at Letterkenny District Court today.

  ISPCA Inspector McGinley said of the dogs that were found by him at the woman’s property:

  These dogs were as emaciated as any I have seen in my 14 years with the ISPCA. It is important that those responsible for such severe cruelty are held accountable to send out the message that it will not be tolerated.

  The Donegal woman submitted a guilty plea through her solicitor Frank Dorrian, said the ISPCA.

  They said that the case is related to a call made by ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley and Gardaí to the woman’s address on 15 January 2013, when two emaciated boxer dogs were discovered.

  The ISPCA said that the dogs were two-year-old brothers and were named Oscar and Elmo by rescuers. The canines were surrendered into the care of the ISPCA and taken for veterinary treatment.


Banned

The ISPCA said that Judge Paul Kelly banned Gallagher from keeping dogs for two years.

  He also adjourned the matter until 9 June for final sentencing.

  It was noted in court that the ISPCA had incurred costs of €652.26.

  When Oscar and Elmo were rescued, the vets who examined them gave them a body score of just one out of five.

  The duo went on to make a full recovery at the ISPCA’s National Animal Centre and were later rehomed.



The surviving dog Willow is being cared for around the clock by the DSPCA.

The Journal.ie, 21/01/2014

THREE DOGS HAD to be put down by the DSPCA after inspectors uncovered a horrific case of animal cruelty in Dublin.

  Inspectors from the DSPCA say that another dog found is in a serious condition and is being monitored 24 hours a day.

  The charity say that they were called to a housing estate after a case of cruelty to a dog had been reported.

  When arriving at the house, the inspectors in fact found four dogs living in what was described as “appalling conditions”.

  The floors were covered in faeces and waste material and all dogs were in terrible conditions suffering from emaciation as well as skin conditions and inflammation of the ears.

  Gardaí assisted inspectors in removing the dogs from the house but three of them were in such a severe state that they were euthanised.

  The fourth dog Willow is currently being cared for.

  Inspectors say that the skeletal and decomposed remains of a number of cats were found in an outside shed.

No arrests have been made but investigations into the case are continuing.



Men plead guilty to training dogs for animal fightsThe PSNI said that the men were aged 43 and 19 years of age.

The Journal.ie, 14/01/2014

A TWO-YEAR investigation into dog fighting saw two men pleading guilty today to keeping animals for use in animal fighting.

  The PSNI welcomed the guilty plea by 43-year-old, Jerimiah Kirkwood, Chris Kirkwood (23) and Wayne Kirkwood (20) from East Belfast, in relation to keeping or training animals for use in connection with animal fights; ownership of items in connection with an animal fight; and also causing unnecessary suffering to four terrier cross pups in Belfast Crown Court.

  Jamie Morrow (19), also from East Belfast, pleaded guilty at Belfast Crown Court to keeping or training animals for use in connection with an animal fight.

Detective Inspector Peter Mullan said of the guilty pleas: The corresponding police investigation has taken over two years and a significant amount of time and energy has been invested in bringing these individuals before the court.

  He thanked the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA), the Scottish SPCA, the Dublin Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and members of the local community for their support during the investigation.

  He added that police will continue to follow up all reports of animal cruelty linked to fighting offences. When the PSNI is made aware of a possible breach in the Wildlife (NI) Order 1985 or Welfare of Animals Act (NI) 2011 for fighting offences, an investigating officer is assigned to carry out inquiries.

  Anyone with information on offences regarding non-farmed animals – including domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys – should contact the animal welfare officer in local councils. Anyone in Northern Ireland who has a suspicion regarding organised fighting offences is asked to contact their nearest police station on 0845 600 8000.



The vet said the hunting dog, Fionn, had received a severe blunt force trauma to the head.

The Journal.ie, 24/12/2013

THE CORK DOG Action Welfare Group (CDAWG) is caring for a dog that was left to die in the woods last week.

  The dog, who the welfare group called Fionn, was found by someone out walking in the woods.

  He was lying in a spot where people dump rubbish and the vet who examined him said he had suffered a severe blow to the head. There were fears that Fionn might not be able to walk or that he may die, but after receiving great care at the shelter, he is said to be on the mend.

  Speaking to TheJournal.ie, Margaret Twohig of CDAWG said it is believed that Fionn was in the ownership of a hunting club. She said that ownership of Fionn has been transferred to the the Dog Action Welfare Group.

  She added that the person who owned Fionn has been identified and she has been told by the club the owner of Fionn has been expelled from the club.


Animal Rights

  “The keeper of Fionn also had other hounds in his care and we have been told that these dogs have been removed from the premises,” she said.

  “We wanted a commitment from the group that his dogs would be removed,” she said.

When Fionn was found she said he was barely alive and was cold to the touch. “He was covered in cuts and pressure sores, a mere skeleton, unable to move. It looked like he had been put there, in amongst the rubbish and left to die. The rain pouring down on his poor body,” she said.

  The group called him Fionn after the legendary Celtic hero Fionn Mac Cumhail. They said it was the perfect name for him, as he was a great Irish warrior who fought and won many battles and had a special love for hounds.

  X-rays revealed that he has a fractured skull due to a blunt force trauma to the head and they feared that he would not survive. However, in what Twohig describes as a “Christmas miracle” he was standing and walking yesterday.

  “The latest update from the vet is that Fionn is on the mend,” said Twohig. The vet said that looking at Fionn when he came in he did not think he was going to make it. “With a fractured skull, there was a possibility of brain damage or that he could have been paralysed, but it is great that he is up walking today,” she said.

  Since the group posted Fionn’s story on Facebook, Twohig said they have been inundated with messages and support for Fionn from all over the world.

  “We have received messages from the UK, Germany and South Africa, all wishing him well and asking for updates. An animal welfare group in Sweden is even holding a fundraiser for him,” she said, adding that she has never seen such a great public reaction to one story. “He really has touched people’s hearts,” she said.

  She said that many people have offered Fionn a home but that they had to wait and see how he gets on over the Christmas.

  While she said that Fionn’s story had obviously resonated with people, she said that they receive many calls about abandoned hounds.

  She said that animal welfare rights “don’t mean much in this country” adding that there are people in power that can strengthen the laws.


Worst time for animal cruelty

  She also said that while she has never had such an overwhelming reaction to Fionn’s story, that this is one of the worst times she has witnessed in animal cruelty, stating that while there are a lot of kind people out there, some people seem to have become “indifferent” to animals.

  She urged people, especially at this time of year, to think about what it means to care for an animal, adding that puppies are not just for Christmas, they deserve to be loved, just like Fionn did, she said.

  Cork Dog Action Welfare Group is a voluntary group and relies on donations. To find out more about the group please click here.



VIDEO: Woman violently kicks helpless dachshund dog
Irish Examiner, 29/12/2015 see more


Fine for woman caught kicking dog blasted ‘too lenient’
UTV Ireland, 29/12/2015

A woman has been fined €300 after pleading guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to a dog at her home earlier this year.

see more


The puppy was found at a popular dog-walking spot with four shotgun shells on its body.

The Journal.ie, 02/12/2013

AN ANIMAL WELFARE group says that it will make a report to gardaí after a puppy was found shot dead in Athlone.

  Billy Gallagher of Athlone SPCA says that he received a call yesterday about the discovery of the husky puppy at the entrance of Glynwood Bog, a popular dog walking spot for families.

  The dog was found with four shotgun cartridges on his body.

  Gallagher says that the society has made contact with the dog’s owner, but that they had abandoned the dog, not shot it.

  “We’re going to pass all of that information off to gardaí.

  “It’s a very popular area for people to bring their dogs for walks. Someone was walking their dog and spotted this and called us.”

Although the picture posted on the society’s Facebook page shows only one side of the dog, Gallagher says the other side would be “too distressing”.

  “I only showed the one side because when I lifted up the dog, half its head was gone. I couldn’t put that up because it would be too distressing to people.

  “I didn’t want to turn the dog over and show what happened.”

Gallagher says that cases like this are the extreme, but they deal with “one or two” cases of dumping, in some instances on motorways, a week.

  Anyone in need of assistance with animals in the area can contact ASPCA on 087 9925052.



Elderly man banned from keeping dogs in ‘graphic and horrific’ caseThe 80-year-old was also handed down a three-month suspended sentence after the ISPCA discovered four dead dogs and four emaciated Collies at his property in Cork.

The Journal.ie, 21/11/2013

AN 80-YEAR-OLD man has been banned from ever owning a dog again in a case described as “the most graphic and horrific” the garda inspector had seen.

  Andrew Doherty of Rowels, Meelin in Cork was convicted of animal cruelty and handed a three-month suspended sentence.

  “If he was a younger man, I would lock him straight up without hesitation,” said presiding judge Brian Sheridan.

Last February, ISPCA inspector Lisa O’Donovan visited Doherty’s property following a complaint to the charity’s helpline. On gaining access, she found four emaciated Collies locked in “filthy dark sheds”.

  She also discovered four Collies which had already died. One was still chained within the shed.

  The live dogs were described as “skeletal”, with one weighing in at only 5.5kg, less than one third of its optimum weight.

  According to animal welfare group, the dogs were extremely nervous on being rescued. “It took hours of gentle coaxing to get even the slightest wag of a tail,” it said.

  “This was a particularly horrendous act of cruelty,” added O’Donovan. “Although we managed to save four of the dogs, one cannot help but think of the poor dogs that perished.”

Speaking in court, Judge Sheridan praised the work of the ISPCA and, in particular, the welfare inspector Lisa O’Donovan who he said had “persisted” on seeing the other property on Doherty’s holding, despite being told an untruth by him.

  The four surviving dogs were taken to the ISPCA’s National Animal Centre where they underwent months of rehabilitation to address their physical and mental problems.  All were eventually rehomed with experienced owners where they needed more time to overcome their difficult pasts.

  “This case highlights what the work of the ISPCA is all about” said the society’s Chief Inspector Conor Dowling, “the 3 R’s – Rescue, Rehabilitation and Rehoming. And, when there is evidence of a criminal offence of cruelty, we will endeavour to have those responsible held accountable”.



Donegal woman receives first prosecution for animal cruelty in Ireland

Irish Central, 29/04/2015

The first successful prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act took place when a Donegal woman pleaded guilty to abandoning her dog with no food or water.

  Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals inspector Kevin McGinley responded to a call on March 12, 2014 following reports that a dog had been abandoned in a rented property in Letterkenny, Co. Donegal.

  McGinley visited the property, and although he could hear a dog inside the house he could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him.

  McGinley became increasingly concerned when there was no response to the note. He returned to the property on March 14 and contacted the Gardai (police) for assistance.

  Small female terrier dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog feces and urine. The dog’s owner Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she claimed initially that the dog called Megan had been sold. She later admitted she hadn’t, but claimed she had fed the dog two days earlier.

  A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, but she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pleaded guilty through her solicitor Kieran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until July 16 and costs of €405 were awarded.

  Judge Paul Kelly said, “Looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenseless animal.”

  Inspector Kevin McGinley said, “The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we were pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been re-homed.

“This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenseless dog like Megan.”



Ballymena man guilty of animal cruelty after emaciated dog dies

Irish News, 24/12/2015

A BALLYMENA man has been handed a suspended jail sentence and received a lifetime ban from keeping pets for animal cruelty offences.

  Paul Sempey (37) of Queen Street in the Co Antrim town pleaded guilty to causing the unnecessary suffering and failing to ensure the welfare of a Staffordshire bull terrier type dog.

  The charges were brought by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council under the Welfare of Animals Act (NI) 2011 and followed an investigation earlier this year.

  Animal welfare officers called at Sempey’s property and found his dog was severely emaciated, less than half its expected body weight and in the final hours of its life.

  Sempey was sentenced to six months in prison suspended for two years and ordered to pay legal costs of £116. In addition he was disqualified for life from the keeping of any ‘warm blooded animal’.

  A spokesman for the council said the local authority gave a high priority to the welfare of domestic pets and horses, and operated a rigorous enforcement policy.

  "Complaints are investigated thoroughly and where necessary formal action is taken, which may include the service of improvement notices or in extreme cases the seizure of animals," he said.

  "The council may also prosecute for offences such as in this particularly harrowing case, which I hope serves as a warning to anyone who does not take appropriate care of animals.”



Donegal woman becomes first to be prosecuted under Animal Health and Welfare Act

Breaking News.ie, 20/04/2015

A Donegal woman has become the first person to be successfully prosecuted under the Animal Health and Welfare Act, as she pleaded guilty to abandoning a dog with no food or water.

  A small female terrier dog was found in a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, by ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley on March 14, 2014.

  He had responded to a call two days earlier following reports that a dog had been abandoned there, he could hear a dog inside the house but could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him.

  Inspector McGinley returned on March 14 and contacted the Gardaí and Local Authority for assistance.

  The dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog faeces and urine.

  The dog’s owner, Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she initially said that the dog called Megan had been sold.

  She later admitted she had not sold the dog, but claimed she had fed it two days earlier. A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, however she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pleaded guilty through her solicitor Ciaran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until July 16, 2015, and costs of €405 have been awarded.

  Judge Paul Kelly said: "Looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenceless animal."

  Inspector McGinley said: "The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed.

  "This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan. We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts."

Dr Andrew Kelly, CEO of the ISPCA, said all animal owners have a responsibility to provide for their animals' needs.

  He said: "This is the first conviction under the Animal Health and Welfare Act which came into force in March 2014.

"The ISPCA hopes that this case will send out a message that animal neglect is not acceptable and we will do all we can to end animal abuse in Ireland."



FIRST SUCCESSFUL PROSECUTION UNDER THE ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELFARE ACT AS DONEGAL WOMAN PLEADS GUILTY

Her.ie

First successful prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act as Donegal woman pleads guilty to abandoning dog with no food or water.

  ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley responded to a call on the 12th March 2014 following reports that a dog had been abandoned in a rented property at Leitir Ard, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal.

  ISPCA Inspector Kevin McGinley visited the property and although he could hear a dog inside the house could not see one. He left a note asking the occupant to contact him. Inspector McGinley became increasingly concerned when there was no response to the note and returned to the property on the 14th March and contacted the Gardaí and Local Authority for assistance.

  A small female terrier dog was discovered living in the kitchen area, which was heavily contaminated with dog faeces and urine. The dog’s owner, Natalie McGranaghan was traced to her mother’s home and she claimed initially that the dog called Megan had been sold.  She later admitted she hadn’t, but claimed she had fed the dog two days earlier.  A bucket filled with water had been left beside the dog, however she was unable to drink from it as it was too tall for her to reach.

  The accused did not appear in court but pled guilty through her solicitor Ciaran O’Gorman.

  Sentencing was adjourned until 16th July 2015 and costs of €405 have been awarded. Judge Paul Kelly said:  “looking at these pictures, this was an appalling thing to do to an unfortunate defenceless animal.”

  Inspector Kevin McGinley said, “The dog was clearly in a poor state before being seized and we are pleased to be able to help before her health deteriorated further. Megan made a full recovery and has since been rehomed. This case clearly demonstrates how the new Animal Health and Welfare Act can work in practice to help a defenceless dog like Megan. We are satisfied with the conviction in this case of neglect, and would like to thank all involved for their efforts.”

  Dr Andrew Kelly, CEO said: “This is the first conviction under the Animal Health and Welfare Act which came into force in March 2014. All animal owners have a responsibility to provide for their animals’ needs. The ISPCA hopes that this case will send out a message that animal neglect is not acceptable and we will do all we can to end animal abuse in Ireland”.

  Minister of Agriculture, Simon Coveney said:  ”I welcome the diligent work of the ISPCA Inspector in bringing this case forward for prosecution under the Animal Health and Welfare Act”.

  If you suspect an animal is being cruelly treated, neglected or abused, please contact the ISPCA National Animal Cruelty Helpline in confidence on 1890 515 515 or report online on www.ispca.ie.



HORROR CRUELTY PROBED AS DOG HAS ITS FOUR PAWS CUT OFF

Evening Echo, 31/08/2015

A DOG had its four paws cut off while it was still alive in a case which is under garda investigation in west Cork.

  The recent incident also involved the skinning of the animal. The matter has been reported to vets and gardaí in west Cork.The story is revealed today as animal welfare workers report that five files about animal cruelty incidents in Cork are currently being considered by the Director of Public Prosecutions.

  The cases related to the discovery of three unlicenced puppy farms and two incidents of deliberate cruelty to dogs.

  The three puppy farms were discovered in the past three months in different areas of the county, according to the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

  The society’s inspector for Cork, Lisa O’Donovan, said she could not reveal specific details but she said that in one case, 13 dogs were removed from a premises.

  She added: “A puppy farm, or a breeding establishment, is somewhere with six bitches or more. One of the places we came across had 30 to 40 dogs.” Ms O’Donovan said that files for the DPP were completed with cooperation from gardaí and the Department of Agriculture.

  The Department of Agriculture has a hotline for those wishing to report instances of animal cruelty. It can be contacted at 1850 211 990 or animalwelfare@agriculture.gov.ie.

  The recent killing of Marvin, a Jack Russell dog in Mayfield, resulted in a huge outcry among the horrified public. He was found badly injured by gardaí in a ditch on August 15 and died from his injuries.



A MAN has been sent for trial accused of kicking a small dog to death in a city park.

  Liam Dowling (44) is charged with animal cruelty offences following an incident in which a terrier was allegedly killed on a sports field.

  He had a book of evidence served on him at Dublin District Court.

  Mr Dowling, of Fitzgibbon Court, Fitzgibbon Street, in the north inner city, is charged with killing a protected animal and causing unnecessary suffering or endangering the health or welfare of an animal.

  Charges were brought under the Animal Health and Welfare Act and the incident is alleged to have happened at Clonliffe College last August 19.

  The DPP had consented to summary disposal of the case at district court level, but Judge Ann Ryan refused to accept jurisdiction to deal with it after hearing a summary of the allegations.

  The case was subsequently re-listed at the request of the DPP, and a state solicitor asked Judge Ryan if she would re-consider.

  She refused, saying: "You do not get two bites of the cherry."

  A book of evidence was subsequently served.

  Judge Ryan gave Mr Dowling the formal notice that he must provide to the prosecution details of any alibi he intends to rely on.

  She sent him forward to the next sittings of Dublin Circuit Criminal Court, remanding him on bail, under existing conditions.

  Mr Dowling did not address the court.

  It was previously reported that animal cruelty workers and gardai were called to Clonliffe College.

  On arrival, they found the dog's body, which was removed by the DSPCA.

A post mortem was later carried out.