Dogs (Greyhounds)

Owner traced in dog drown hunt

Star, 5/3/1997

Gardai have identified the owner and breeder of two greyhounds found drowned – with concrete blocks tied to their necks – two weeks ago. Shocking pictures in the Star showed how the dogs were weighed down and dumped in a Co. Cork river. Gardai have been able to pinpoint the owner from ID numbers tattooed on the hounds’ inner ears. The dogs were found washed up on the banks of the river Ilen near Skibbereen. Each was thought to be aged about two.


Farmer wins appeal on pups shooting sentence

Irish Examiner, 17/1/2003
A farmer who shot two greyhounds pups owned by his neighbour after they worried his cattle successfully appealed at Waterford Circuit Court yesterday (16/01/03) against the severity of a sentence previously imposed on him at the district court.  see more

Nightmare – 36 greyhound trucked 900 miles in one van in 40°C heat on a 38hr journey to hell

The People, 27/7/2003

Dozens of greyhounds were squashed together in 40°C heat for a 38hour trip across Europe.  see more

Terrier torn apart by free running greyhounds.

Irish Independent, 13/11/2003

A jack Russell terrier named Lucky was torn apart by six greyhounds allowed to run free by their breeder. The revelation came as part-time breeder Anthony O’Mahony (40) was fined and ordered to pay €620 compensation by Cork District Court arising from the events of February 9th last. Judge David Riordan heard that the greyhounds savaged the little dog despite frantic efforts by his owner to protect him. The dog suffered appalling injuries and had to be put down. Gardai traced the greyhounds to Mr O’Mahony of Curraleigh, Inniscarra. Mr O’Mahony paid €150 in compensation to the victim and agreed to pay €140 in witness expenses, Judge Riordan fined him €110 on each of three charges of keeping an unlicensed dog.


Mutilated greyhounds dumped in river

Irish Independent, 7/9/2005

Animal rights groups have expressed horror at the discovery of the mutilated remains of three greyhounds, floating in a river. The dogs, found in Co Waterford, had their throats cut and ears sliced off. The discovery has shocked both locals and Greyhound Action Ireland (GAI) which is campaigning for the humane treatment of dogs. GAI official Tony Peters warned that such incidents of animal cruelty were no longer isolated.



Six month suspended sentence in animal cruelty case

Leinster Express, 22/12/2008

A woman who claimed to rescue dogs has been given a six month suspended jail sentence after her appeal against a conviction for animal cruelty failed.  see more



Greyhounds shot and dumped in Limerick quarry after poor trials

Limerick Leader, 02/05/2013

THE OWNER of greyhounds that were shot and dumped in a quarry in County Limerick refused to tell gardai who killed the animals, a court has heard.  see more



Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds
The Irish Times, 12/04/2012
The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention
of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”. Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.



Farmer wins appeal on pups shooting sentence

Irish Examiner, 17/01/2003

a farmer who shot two greyhounds pups owned by his neighbour after 3)they worried his cattle successfully appealed at Waterford Circuit Court yesterday (16/03/2001) against the severity of a sentence previously imposed on him at the district court.

Nicholas Kenneally, Smartcastle, Kilmacow Co. Kilkenny has received a three-month suspended sentence and was fined €700 for cruelty, ill-treating the 15-week-old pups on July 6, 2001. Bernard Fox said he had more than 20 greyhounds and that there was “bad blood” between the two families. One of the pups died and the other had to be put down later. Veterinary surgeon George Kinsella said the pups were in a state of complete collapse after the incident with up to 20 pellets under their skin.

Mr. Kenneally said he saw 25 to 30 of his cattle excited and running with three dogs chasing them and swinging from their tails. The cattle ran through wire fences and gate and the farmer said he had no alternative but to get the gun and fire at the dogs. He said for the last 10 years he had endured continuous problems with dogs following his cattle and some sheep had been killed.

Judge Michael O’Shea said yesterday that it would have been impossible for the pups to worry the cattle so as to give reasonable apprehension that injury would be caused to the animals. Discharging the gun was, he said, reckless and unreasonable behaviour.

The judge said however that he would withdraw the suspended prison sentence and reduce the fine by €100 to €600. He said there was no evidence that Mr. Kenneally was a risk with a gun and he was satisfied that he remained a suitable person to hold a licensed firearm. The judge directed that the weapon be returned to the farmer.



Mutilated greyhounds dumped in river

Irish Independent, 07/09/2005

Animal rights groups have expressed horror at the discovery of the mutilated remains of three greyhounds, floating in a river. The dogs, found in Co Waterford, had their throats cut and ears sliced off. The discovery has shocked both locals and Greyhound Action Ireland (GAI) which is campaigning for the humane treatment of dogs. GAI official Tony Peters warned that such incidents of animal cruelty were no longer isolated.



Family’s shock to find hacked dog

Horrific: Poor little greyhound lay with ears sliced off after vicious mutilation

Evening Herald, 20/10/2005

This is the gruesome sight that greeted the Maher family when they returned home from a celebration with family and friends.

  The viciously mutilated and starving greyhound bounded in the front door of their Co Tipperary home, horrifying little Aaron (5) and Ellen (3) Maher.

  The emaciated animal – its ears hacked off and half its scalp cut – ran straight down to a bedroom.

  But the brave pooch – which has since been given the name Fionn – just wagged its tail, no doubt delighted to be indoors after suffering outside for what, its carers say, must have been weeks.


Freezing

Speaking to the Evening Herald, Donna Maher said: “(The dig) was starving and freezing but absolutely friendly. Even though he was in a lot of pain he was still wagging his tail.”

  She described the reaction of her children to the horrific sight.

  “Ellen noticed (the wounds) first. She came in screaming. My 13-year-old (Sarah) was crying her heart out. My son (Aaron) didn’t know what to think.

  “They were all disgusted. It was a pitiful looking sight. Anyone who can do that to an animal cannot say they are human.”

The Mahers had been out celebrating the 11th birthday of their friends’ son on Saturday when they returned home to find Fionn.

  “How can you explain this to a child? (Fionn) looked like he had been in a fight with another dog. He was starting to smell because (the wound) was getting infected,” Donna said.

The family kept Fionn in their house in Moyne overnight and the next day brought it to the local vet, while also contacting the Tipperary Friends of Animals SPCA, which is now looking after the tragic little dog.

  Sarah even offered to pay for his upkeep out of the money she earns from babysitting because she does not want him to be put down.

  The society assured the family, however, that Fionn will not be put down, even if no one offers him a home. Bernie Wright of Greyhound Action Ireland is now calling for an end to greyhound racing as the only solution to stop this kind of mutilation being inflicted on dogs.

  “As greyhounds are tattooed on both ears to identify them for racing and coursing purposes, this practice is becoming all too common in Ireland and the UK.”

In the coming weeks, the group will be distributing flyers with Fionn’s photo and the heading ‘do you know this dog?’ at every racecourse in Ireland.

  The heartless mutilation of Fionn is just the latest in a litany of savage attacks occurring on greyhounds in this country.

  In Waterford two months ago, a man out walking his dog by a riverbank came across the bodies of three greyhounds, their throats cut and their ears removed.



Filthy animals

Shocking mutilation exposed

Sick dog owners cut ears off unwanted greyhounds

Sunday World, 11/12/2005

Callous dog-owners cutting the ears off unwanted greyhounds before abandoning the dogs.

  Old, injured or unwanted greyhounds are being mutilated before being ditched in a bid to hide identifying tattoos on the dogs’ ears.

  In some cases battery acid or blow torches appear to have been used on the dogs.

  Campaigner Bernie Wright has lashed the racing industry for not doing more to stop the unscrupulous owners from carrying out the savage practice.

  One rescued greyhound was found in Ballinasloe, County Galway with her ears cut off and the fur on her head singed.


Infected

The wounds had bec6omed infected and the dog had a gaping hole on her head.

  Despite the cruelty inflicted on her, the dog which has now been named Eva, is doing well according to Bernie.

  However, when it comes to the people who carried out the savage attack Bernie doesn’t mince her words: “They are pure scum. Her ears were septic, of a texture like charred fabric6 and one was burned right through with a gaping hole. The bluish ink from the greyhound industry tattoos was apparent on bits of her ear that were still hanging in tatters,” said Bernie.

  The dog has since been making a good recovery.

  Three dead dogs discovered in Waterford river last September also had their ears removed to disguise the official identifying tattoo.

  Greyhound Action Ireland ran a campaign to identify another dog found with a mutilated scalp. “Fionn” appeared to have been the vic6tim of someone using a crude b8lade which left the skin hacked and infected.


Reward

Animal welfare campaigners claim that the racing industry is responsible for the deaths of 14,000 dogs a year and called for an end to tax exemptions.

  However, the Irish Greyhound Board responded to the cruelty meted out to Fionn by offering a reward of €15,000 for information leading to the conviction of the perpetrator.

There are also plans to introduce a DNA system which is expected to be up and running within the next 12 to 18 months. The board also has a full time welfare officer who runs a retired greyhound trust.



Cruel beyond belief

Top racing dogs left to die

Irish Daily Mirror, 07/02/2008

Sick thugs left this defenceless greyhound to die in agony from open wounds, it has been revealed.

  The terrified animal, who was starving and had bones protruding, had to be put down because she was in such an appalling state.

  A horrified litter warden found the award-winning bitch and another 12 dogs cowering in a shed in their own excrement near Dundalk, Co Louth.

  Louth SPCA inspector Fiona Squibb said: “she was totally malnourished.

  “She was emaciated and her ribs were protruding. She had open gaping sores the size of tennis balls from where she had been lying on the hard floor.

  “Two of them were so bad that you c6ould see the bones through the wounds.

  “The vet said she had terrible muscle wastage from not getting enough to eat.

  “We were able to identify the dogs from the tattoos on their ears and discovered that the bitch was actually an A1 racing dog which had won a number of races at Dundalk stadium.

  “It was very sad to see her end like this.

  “Some of the other dogs also had pressure sores although they were not in as bad a condition as the bitch.

  “The dogs were being kept in a shed in an isolated area and when we went in I thought there was a dead animal as the smell was so bad.

  “The c6onditions that the dogs were being kept were absolutely appalling.

  “There was excrement and urine everywhere and the whole place was soaking wet. It was disgusting. There was a river of effluent running down the middle of what would have been once an old milking shed.

  “The shed was divided into temporary compartments and the dogs had no bedding and were lying on bare concrete floors.” A Bord na gCon steward, Louth County veterinary Officer Garrett Shine and Louth local authority dog wardens and the gardai went to the scene after being alerted about the appalling conditions.

  Animal welfare authorities are set to take legal action against the dog owner.

  Fiona said the Bord na gCon steward was appalled at the condition the dogs were in and told her it was the worst he had ever seen.

She added: “Bord na gCon have now taken the dogs and are looking after them and they will be rehomed.”



Bodies of mutilated dogs found in river

Irish Times, 01/08/2008

Animal welfare workers were stunned by the extent of cruelty behind the deaths of two unwanted greyhounds. The badly mutilated bodies were recovered this week from a tributary of the river Foyle near St Johnston, Co Donegal.

  Experts reckoned they were about three years old when dumped with weights in the water. They had probably ended their racing lives either through injury or for some other reason and their owner was no longer prepared to give them a home. The ears, where racing greyhounds carry identification marks, were cut off one of the dogs, a male.

  There was part of a rope around the neck of the other, a female, indicating a weight had been attached before she was dropped in the river, probab8ly from a bridge over the Suille river near the Northern Ireland Border. The female’s head had been almost entirely eaten by rats.

  The bodies were spotted floating on Wednesday morning by a loc6al farmer near St Johnston.

ISPCA inspector Kevin McGinley removed the carcases from the river. He was still shocked when he spoke yesterday about the discovery. “It was mind-blowing that such wanton cruelty exists. It just reminds us of the need for people to have a change of attitude towards animal welfare.”

  Mr McGinley said it was not possible to say if the dogs were dead or alive when dumped, because of the decomposition.

  “This is as bad as it gets. People who are capable of doing something like this to animals could be just as capable of human abuse and that worries me.”



Horror of dog found slashed

News of the World, 23/04/2006

Vets hope DNA testing will help track down the owner of a mutilated greyhound.  ‘Aoife’, whose ears had been cruelly hacked off, was found dumped in Tramore, Co Waterford.  The ISPCA’s Andrew Quinn said that the animal is recovering from its ordeal.



My shock drugs claims – RTE star

Evening Herald, 19/04/2005

GAA commentator Michael O Muircheartaigh today described his “shock” at claims his greyhound tested positive for a banned substance.

  The RTE sports star described how he was “shocked about this and didn’t know anything about it.”

  Speaking thought his wife Helen, the renowned broadcaster who is laid up with laryngitis, said: “The trainer didn’t tell him about it and he only found out yesterday. He doesn’t know what to think.”


Nobody told me about doping – Michael

The legendary mic man has been unable to speak for the past two weeks due to the throat illness.

  The greyhound, Heart Rumble, recently tested positive for the drug nandrolone.

  The dog is looked after by Paul Hennessy, the country’s best known trainer and he was fined €1,169 and severely reprimanded by the National Greyhound   Racing Club in London last week at a disciplinary hearing.

  A source close to the family said Michael had been speaking to Paul a week ago and he said nothing about it then. Michael is “very annoyed” at this as people have been ringing up about the scandal.

  None of the other owners in the syndicate knew about the doping claims either, said the source

  The dog was competing in a race in Sunderland on December 4 last year and was subjec6ted to a urine test after competing. The dog’s urine tested positive for nandrolone and three other substances.

  Trainer Paul Hennessay, this evening confirmed that he had not informed Michael.

“You have to understand the dog had a medical problem and was treated under veterinary supervision. There was nothing illegal or prohibited about using the drug in this country,” said Mr Hennessy.



Two face charges over dog shipment

The Star, 22/07/2003

Two men are due to face charges in Spain for transporting greyhounds from Ireland to the continent under shockingly cruel conditions.

  The practice only came to light when animal welfare investigators followed one of the dog shipments on a 38 hour journey from Ireland to Spain.

  The father and son, aged 60 and 39 – from Britain – were apprehended after investigating offic6ers involved found 36 racing greyhounds squashed inside 20 tiny cages.

  The animals had been trapped inside a truck in temperatures reaching 10x4 degrees Fahrenheit.

  The animals were packed like battery hens in the back of a stinking truck in Ireland and transported, by road and sea, to Spain to begin their racing careers.

  When they were rescued, they were hot, thirsty and frightened and were panting for air due to anxiety.

  During the 38-hour trip by ferry and road from Roscoff in Ireland to Barcelona the pair stopped to give the dogs some water only once and didn’t give them food.



Two owners suspended in greyhound racing probe

Sunday World, 18/04/1999

A major probe into a scam in the country’s multi-million pound greyhound industry resulted in two owners being suspended from involvement in the sport.

  The investigation centred on claims that they had been giving incorrec6t details about the past performances of their animals before entering them for races.  News of the suspensions only emerged yesterday although they took place last year.

  It is understood that one of the banned owners is a native of Galway city.  Both he and the other banned owner became the focus of the inquiry after enjoying successes with their animals at the city’s greyhound track.

  It is known that bookies attending the track were deeply concerned for some time at the results of those races.

  A number complained that it was virtually impossible to make money at the Galway track. Some even declined to attend the weekly meeting.


Refused

A spokesman for Bord Na gCon refused to reveal the identity of the two dogs owners yesterday but confirmed they had been suspended.

  “They were suspended last September following an inquiry,” he said. “The disciplinary measure was taken by our control committee.

  “In reality it means that they have been suspended from participating in the greyhound industry.”

The spokesman added that the move followed irregularities in the recording of dogs’ time trials.

It was found that the performances recorded on the identity cards of their competing animals ware in many cases incorrect.



‘Sickening’ scenes as hare fed to dogs

Evening Herald, 27/03/2006

Gardai are investigating incidents of “sickening” cruelty in which live hares have been fed to greyhounds on a west Dublin housing estate.

  The incidents came to light after a member of the public saw group of youths taking two live hares from a sack and throwing them to a pack of dogs.  The hares were killed by the greyhounds and dismembered instantly.

  The attack took place on St Cuthbert’s Park, Deansrath, Clondalkin, on Saturday March 11.

  Gardai believe the youths were involved in the illegal practice of blooding the greyhounds who are then taken hunting for hares and rabbits most likely as part of their training for racing.

  Since the cruelty was uncovered garda patrols have been increased on the estate.

  The Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and South Dublin County Council’s dog wardens have also both become involved.  It has emerged that this incident was only one of a number of similar cases to have taken place.

  A spokesman for the DSPCA said his organisation had learned of a number of illegal blooding cases involving live hares in the area.  He said some of these had taken place on the street in the Deansrath housing estate.  The society has also received reports of attacks taking place in the grounds of a company in the Clondalkin area.



Cruelty to greyhounds

Irish Examiner, 24/10/2009

Thomas Daly with an address at Ballyhagen, Carbury, Co. Kildare was convicted of cruelty to two greyhounds at Kildare District Court.  

  The court here that ISPCA chief inspector Conor Dowling found a greyhound bitch living in a filthy cattle trailer and a greyhound dog in a small mucky pen with no shelter or bedding.

  Judge Desmond Zaidan gave Daly a three-month custodial sentence on each count to run concurrently. The accused was fined €1, 1150 on each count and ordered to pay expense of



Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

I  nspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

  “It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

  The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

  “The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”



Family distraught after pet attacked and killed by pack of hunt hounds

Isabelle, a hypoallergenic family dog, died after being attacked by hounds that were part of a hunt organised by the ‘Bray Harriers’ club.

Journal.ie,  01/12/2013

A FAMILY IN Ashford, Co Wicklow say they’ve been left shocked after their pet dog was attacked by a pack of hunting hounds yesterday afternoon.

  It happened at around 4pm when a hunt by the Bray Harriers club was taking place in the area. The family pet, a hypoallergenic dog named ‘Isabelle’ died from her injuries.

  Club Secretary with Bray Harriers David Power confirmed that the incident happened, but said he had no further details and wasn’t at the scene himself.

  “The dogs came in in two packs, one on either side of the house,” Isabelle’s owner Kayleigh told TheJournal.ie.

  “They were totally out of control. They chased her until they caught her and basically savaged her.”

Kayleigh said that her brother and her father, who is in his 50s, tried to separate the animals, along with members of the hunting party.

  Once the hounds were called off, the wounded dog ran into a nearby field. She was brought back to the house by one of the hunters. A vet who was with the hunting party briefly tended to her, but she died from from her injuries inside the family home.

  “There were about four riders on horses I think. Another two horses without riders,” Kayleigh said.

  “It was chaos. They were basically trespassing on our property.

Kayleigh, who has started a Facebook campaign calling for stricter regulation of hunting, says residents weren’t informed by the club that the hunt would be taking place in the area this weekend.

  On the Bray Harriers website, a hunt listed for yesterday is still labelled this afternoon as ‘TBC’ and no location is given.

  “That’s the most shocking part. No-one was aware of it. That dogs like this can run uncontrolled on roads and on private property is just incredible.”

Kayleigh’s Facebook page calls for the “shocking and barbaric sport” to be more strictly regulated, and for tough new laws to be introduced to protect people and other animals.

  In the short-term, she said, the Bray Harriers and clubs like them should inform communities in areas where they plan to hold meetings.

  She said that two of the riders had spoken to the family in the aftermath of the incident, apologised, and offered compensation for what had happened.

  “What can you say though? It won’t bring Isabelle back.”

She said they told her they would be back in contact today, but as of this afternoon, the family hadn’t heard anything.

  According to its website, Bray Harriers have around 100 members who are “mostly from the south Dublin and north Wicklow areas” and they carry out hunts each Wednesday and Saturday from October until March.

  They also held a meet last Wednesday, while last weekend they were in the Roundwood area.



Irish Times, 10/01/2010

A greyhound control steward in Dundalk stadium has resigned following allegations that he allowed a “ringer” to win a race last June. Declan Haughey left his position at the end of last year after an internal investigation found irregularities in a race in which Mays Hurryonboy, a novice, won in a near course-record time of 28.4 seconds, 13 lengths clear of second place. As the two-year-old dog’s time was more than two seconds faster than in a trial three weeks earlier, it raised instant suspicions among spectators and bookmakers. Greyhound sources said a two-second improvement in three weeks was almost unprecedented. The case is the latest in a series of alleged cheating incidents and disputes to beset the Irish Greyhound Board (IGB), which will get almost €12m in state funding this year.



Leinster Leader, 28/10/2009

Twenty-year-old Thomas Daly, of Ticknevin, Carbury, pleaded guilty before the court to two charges of starving two greyhounds.



Mutilated coursing dogs found dumped on Limerick beach.

Irish Independent, 04/06/2009

Three mutilated greyhounds, believed to have been coursing dogs, were found dumped at a popular bathing spot in Limerick. The Limerick Leader has reported that the animals had their ears cut off so that the owners could not be identified. This is just the latest act of appalling barbarity against Irish greyhounds.


Growth in dog fighting rings sparks appeal for crackdown.

Irish Independent, 05/05/2009

Tamer dogs such as greyhounds are often used as "bait" during the training phase of a fighting-dog's career, giving the animal a taste for blood and some practice in fighting. Two abandoned, severely-injured greyhounds, found in the last week in the Clonmel area are thought to have been used as training material for fighting dogs. Gardai and the Tipperary SPCA are currently investigating the discoveries. "One dog was quite literally torn open," said Mark Hickey of the TSPCA. "It was still alive when we found it but had to be put down by the vet because the injury was so bad. It [the tear] started below the rib cage, and continued down into the dog's side and into the groin." Another greyhound/whippet, aged about five, found around the same time had up to 80 puncture wounds -- consistent with being repeatedly attacked by a fighting dog. "He was also brought to the vet but died of shock," said Hickey. The first dog, thought to have been between two and three years old, was originally a racing greyhound as it had an official tattoo, and the SPCA have asked Bord na gCon for help in tracing its owners.



Unwanted Greyhounds shot for 10 Euro.

Irish Sun, 21/05/2009  

An Irish greyhound executioner called Larry Earle has been exposed in the Irish Sun ... Earle of Camolin, County Wexford admitted killing greyhounds with a captive bolt gun for 10 euros a time. He said ‘a bolt gun that’s it, end of story them they’re sent to the rendering plant. He refused to say how many greyhounds he kills a year.


Bodies of mutilated dogs found in River.

Irish Times, 01/08/2008

Animal welfare workers were stunned by the extent of cruelty behind the deaths of two unwanted greyhounds.The badly mutilated bodies were recovered from the river Foyle near st Johnston Co .Donegal.They were about 3 years old when dumped with weights in the water.The ears were cut off one of the dogs.There was a rope around the neck of the female indicating a weight had been attached before she was dropped in the river.The bodies were found floating by a local farmer.


Dead dog dumping ground sparks probe.

Irish Examiner, 19/03/2008

THE ISPCA and the Irish Greyhound Board have launched investigations into the discovery of the carcasses of several dogs — including some greyhounds — in a remote west Cork woodland. The gruesome finds were made in recent weeks in the Coppeen region and have prompted fears that owners have been using the isolated area as a dumping ground for unwanted greyhounds.


Greyhounds tested positive at Brandywell, says ICC.

Derry Journal, 12/10/2007

Eight Northern Irish greyhound owners have been fined in the past year after their dogs tested positive for banned substances - including cocaine. Other substances found included amphetamine, also known as speed.



Racing dog had 'ecstasy in system'.

Irish Independent, 28/10/2007

It is understood to be the first time that an animal was found with benzylpiperazine (BZP) anywhere since the substance was added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances last year. It also comes just months after a new independent committee was set up to investigate doping in greyhound racing. BZP is legally sold in Ireland as an ecstasy substitute in dance clubs and various outlets, and is also available in health stores here as a slimming pill. In April of this year, a dog running at Lifford in Donegal was tested and BZP was found, and the new independent body overseeing the policing of greyhound racing has since fined the owner €250.

2007 "Tigresa" aka "Biddy the Lark" aka "Barcelona Super Girl". She started life as "Biddy the Lark" racing in Ireland then at some point she was exported to Spain ... presumably because she was no longer fast enough to race in Ireland. In Spain she ran at the Meridiana track near Barcelona (now closed) a total of 213 times and between 19th March and 26th December 2004 she ran a race every 2 or 3 days ... basically she was run into the ground. When the track closed her "owner" didn't want her anymore and she was lucky to be rescued by the Scooby refuge.



Mutilated greyhound heralds tighter controls.

Sunday Times, 17/06/2007

Regulations dealing with the registration and sale of greyhounds have been introduced after the discovery of a mutilated animal in Waterford. Officers fro the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) rescued the greyhound, which they named Aoife, after a day-long chase around Tramore in April last year. The dog's ears had been cut off to prevent its owners being tracked using its unique ear tattoo. The owner, traced by the DNA sample, said he sold Aoife to another trainer. This second man has told the greyhound board and the gardai that he sold the dog to an unidentifiable traveller he met "on the road".



€6,000 bill for cramping dogs.

Irish Independent, 03/09/2006

A man who transported greyhounds from Ireland to England to race them has been ordered to pay £4,000 (€6,000) towards the cost of his prosecution after he appeared before an English court accused of carrying them in cramped cages. Bernard Martin McBride of Ardmayle Cashel, Co Tipperary, pleaded guilty when he appeared before magistrates in Bristol yesterday, to a transit offence in relation to 10 greyhounds. The court heard how the police pulled over a white Mercedes van in August last year and found it contained rows and rows of caged dogs, with further rows behind them. Animal welfare inspector Glyn Roberts, who was called to assist, found the dogs in small, stacked cages, some of which were just 32.28 inches high. One black and white greyhound had been transported in a collapsible travel cage which was lower in height than the peak of the dog's back bone - let alone his head carriage, she said.



Revealed; the dog-doping secret.

Unison.ie, 18/5/2006

Sports Minister critical of parties involved in doping controversy. Sports Minister John O'Donaghue has criticised parties involved in the Bord na gCon doping controversy for commenting publicly on the matter against his wishes. Former Chief executive Aidan Tynan has maintained his silence in recent days, however Bord na gCon Chairman Pascal Taggart issued a statement last night in which he claimed a report, commissioned following a dog-doping scandal backed his position. Mr. Taggart says the report shows that Aidan Tynan was fired for reasons other than his stance on the doping issue. The affair began when Mr Tynan wrote a letter to the Sports Minister in January complaining that the board was covering up evidence of doping in greyhound racing.


Greyhound abandoned with ears cut off.

Irish Examiner, 14/04/2006

DNA samples have been taken from a greyhound which had its ears cut off in a determined bid by animal welfare authorities in Waterford to track down those responsible for the savage act. Yesterday, Andrew Quinn, Waterford SPCA, had enlisted the help of Bord na gCon and the Irish Coursing Club in bringing to justice those who mutilated Aoife, the young female pedigree dog. With her ears cut off, the dog was abandoned. She was found wandering the streets of Tramore, Co Waterford hungry, thirsty and terrified.



Sickening scenes as hares fed to dogs

Evening Herald, 27/03/20006  

Gardai are investigating incidents where live hared are being fed to greyhounds in a West Dublin housing Estate.a member of the public saw youths taking hares from a sack and throwing them to a pack of dogs.the hares were killed and dismembered immediately.It took place at St Cuthberts Pk Deansrath, Clondalkin.Gardai believe this blooding is in training for racing, this incident was one of a number in the area.also in the grounds of a Clondalkin Company.



Dog part owned by Vinnie Jones fails drug test

Irish Times, 23/03/2006

BOAVISTA, Owned by Jones and Irishmen Pat Curtin and Dinny Gould.

The top coursing greyhound has tested positive for drugs following the Irish cup in limerick.the win at the Irish cup stretched his unbeaten record to 24 courses since Sept 2005.

In taking on charlie Bird, RTE and the government. The Greyhound Industry scandal took another bizarre twist yesterday when the controversial chairman of Bord na gCon Paschal Taggart moved to defend his role in the sacking of its CEO Aidan Tynan and the covering up of two positive drugs tests on Irish dogs. Mr Taggart held a colourful press conference at Shelbourne Park dog track in Dublin in which he launched a vicious attack on RTE reporter Charlie Bird, he alleged that Mr Tynan might not have been sacked but for the intervention of Sports Minister John O Donoghu, he claimed that Tim Dalton, a former secretary-general of the Dept of justice, was incapable of investigating the scandal. In future he said, he would propose that all positive dope tests on dogs be published. The scandal erupted just over two weeks ago after Mr Tynan wrote to Mr O Donoghue complaining that positive drug tests had been suppressed by Mr Taggart. It has since emerged that two dogs were discovered to have been dosed with the human performance enhancing drug EPO in 2005.



Horror of dog found slashed.

News of the World, 23/4/2006

Vets hope DNA testing will help track down the owner of a mutilated Greyhound.Aoife whose ears had been cruelly hacked off was found dumped in Tramore, Co. Waterford.The ISPCAs Andrew Quinn said the dog is recovering from her ordeal.


Blooding Greyhounds

Irish Independent, 17/04/2006

The current investigation by Gardai into the greyhound blooding incident in a Dublin park is a numbing reminder that the practice continues despite being highly illegal. Blooding has been flagged over the years by racing scene journalist, John Martin, who is on record as saying that “the bald truth is that greyhound racing would not continue to exist without blooding (and) it follows that, with a constant greyhound population of close on 30,000, blooding must be widespread”.


Mutilate greyhounds dumped in river.

Irish Independent, 07/09/2005

Dogs were dumped in a river in Co. Waterford with their throats cut and ears sliced off.

  Greyhound Rescue West of England Press Release – May 2005 : More Greyhounds Rescued with their Ears Amputated! Greyhound Rescue West of England (GRWE), have recently taken into their care, two greyhounds who have had their ears amputated. Greyhounds who are bred for racing are tattooed in their ears, and are registered in their owners details. Cutting off a dog’s ears was obviously meant to avoid the dog being traced back to the unscrupulous owner who had dumped Heather and left her to die. Greyhounds are bred in their thousands for racing, and many are abandoned every year when they are unwanted by their owners, if they are not fast enough for the track. GRWE rescues and finds homes for as many dogs as it can help, and places them into loving family homes. In 2004 the charity, which is run by volunteers, and receives no money from the racing industry, found homes for 500 dogs. Last week GRWE were contacted by another small rescue in Ireland, who had had a greyhound dumped on their door step, again with her ears amputated. Georgie the greyhound, was in a terrible state, her ears had been hacked off, and she was obviously in considerable pain.



Slaughtered greyhounds' ears hacked off to avoid identification.

Irish Mirror, 05/09/2005

Three greyhounds were found with their throats cut and ears hacked off. The mutilated bodies of the dogs were found floating in a river near Dungarvan, Co Waterford. Their horrific injuries had been inflicted in a bid to remove their identification tattoo and prevent identification. This sickening incident is the latest example of cruelty being investigated by Gardai. In April a greyhound was rescued after she had her ears sliced off and was left bleeding heavily in the north Kerry village of Ballydaff.



Greyhounds on Viagra.

Limerick Post, 11/12/2004

A SPOKESPERSON from Greyhound Action Ireland has claimed that "drugs like Viagra are constantly being sold at dog racing tracks in Ireland and greyhounds are suffering horrifically from the hell of withdrawal symptoms”. Some dogs are even given cocaine to boost their performances, she claims. Limerick is regarded as being one of the Meccas for greyhound racing and training in the country, with races three days a week at the greyhound racing track at the Markets Field. Prize money can range from 200 euro to over 35,000 euro in sweep stakes and the sport attracts a huge interest in the city. Talking to the Limerick Post, Bernie Wright said that "this drug is sold by pushers who have obtained it on prescription from MDs” and the practice is allowed to continue because "there is very little testing”. "Viagra, which is given to quicken the heart-rate of the dogs, is a major racket at Irish dog racing tracks. Dogs are suffering horrifically and routinely at the hands of trainers and owners. They should not be subjected to the hell of withdrawal symptoms from drugs such as EPO, a steroid that shows no traces or Largactyl, a sedative also used at dog tracks to slow dogs down. We in Greyhound Action appeal to anyone who has further information on drugs being used to contact us immediately. They can remain anonymous,” said Ms Wright. She also said that "cocaine is also given to dogs to improve their performance”. Ms Wright then referred to a recent article which appeared in a national newspaper, recounting how a greyhound trainer who tried to inject his dog with drugs, accidentally injected himself.


Bord na gCon says it knows owners of shot greyhounds

Irish Times, 12/04/2014

The Irish Greyhound Board has confirmed it has identified the owners of a number of greyhounds, whose decomposing carcasses were found dumped in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, west Limerick, over the Easter weekend. It is believed the dogs were shot in the head and then discarded in contravention of the recently introduced Greyhound Welfare Bill.

  Bord na gCon said it was “working with gardaí to bring the offenders to justice” and “condemned” such actions. It added that identification markings on some of the dogs “were still intact” and “the owners of same has already been identified and will now be questioned”.

Newcastle West gardaí are investigating and are due to question the owners identified.




Man fined €800 after greyhounds found dead

Irish Examiner, 26/04/2013

A man handed over two greyhounds to a third party who shot them in the head, after they showed no promise of chasing hares, a court heard yesterday.

  Avoiding paying a vet €80 to have each dog humanely put down by injection, John Corkery gave the animals to a man who shot them.

  The two dogs were found, along with four other greyhounds rotting in a disused quarry at Ballyagran, Co Limerick, on Apr 10, 2012.

  Corkery, aged 53, a well-known greyhound trainer, had been rearing the dogs for coursing competitions and track racing events.

  The owners of the remaining four dead dogs found are unknown.

  Inspector Eamon O’Neill told Newcastle West District Court the case was “the first of its kind” to be brought before court after legislation, under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act was introduced in Nov 2011.

  Corkery, of Love Lane, Charleville, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to one count of forging his son’s name as the registered owner of a greyhound Rathluirc Sham.

  He also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of the transfer of ownership of Kildangan Dawn.

  Judge Mary Larkin noted that, despite his guilty pleas, Corkery would not identity the person who shot the two dogs.

  Solicitor Denis Linehan said: “From the outset, he put his hands up to this.”

  Inspector O’Neill agreed, without the pleas of guilt, it would have been “difficult” for gardaí to secure a prosecution.

“It is the inhumane manner in which the dogs were put down that gives the gravest offence,” Judge Larkin said. She fined Mr Corkery €300 for the forgery charge and €500 for the failing to notify transfer of ownership offence.

The Irish Greyhound Board last night said it welcomed the “successful prosecution”.

“The IGB have worked with the gardaí in bringing about this successful prosecution to ensure the full facts of the case were investigated. It is hoped that today’s prosecution will act as a deterrent and ensure that all owners and trainers

will be compliant with the act in the future,” it said.

IGB welfare manager Barry Coleman added: “The IGB condemns all acts of neglect towards greyhounds and encourages, at all times, responsible ownership practices. This first ever prosecution under the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, which   the IGB helped develop, sets a strong precedent for the future and should further reinforce our tough stance against any potential transgressors.”



Cork man fined for forging son's name

Irish Examiner, 25/04/2013

A Cork man has been fined €800 after pleading guilty to charges in connection with the shooting of greyhounds last year.

  In what was the first case of its type in the country, John Corkery pleaded guilty to forging his son's name as the registered owner of a greyhound.

  The 53-year old from Love Lane, Charleville, also pleaded guilty to failing to notify the Irish Coursing Board of a transfer of ownership in relation to a greyhound.

  The dogs were two of four found shot in the head in a disused quarry in Co Limerick in April last year.

  Mr Corkery told Gardaí he handed over the two dogs to a third party to dispose of after they showed no promise in chasing hares.