Cockerel

Judge orders cock fight duo to pay fines.

Irish Independent, 25/3/1998

Two men were ordered to pay ₤200 each to the ISPCA when they admitted attending a cockfight.  see more


Fears of cock-fighting ring after birds found dumped

Irish Examiner, 02/08/2011

ANIMAL welfare groups are concerned there may be a cock-fighting ring operating in the Dundalk area after a number of injured cocks and other fighting birds were found dumped.  see more



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-25323551), 10/12/2013

Cock-fighting is a practice that has been illegal for almost 200 years.

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting. The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations. There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing. At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels. A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed. Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.

Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border. At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh. On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring. These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.  Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.



Cock-up over a summons

Irish Independent, 09/05/2003

A District Court judge threw out a charge against a man allegedly involved in a cockfight last summer.

  The case was dismissed at Kells court yesterday after the man’s solicitor successfully argued that the townland on the summons was incorrect.  However, Judge John Brophy indicated he would have considered imposing a jail term on the man if he had been convicted.

  The judge made his ruling after viewing video footage from the Garda Air Support Unit helicopter after it had come upon a group of about 30 people in Diamor, Kells, Co Meath on June 23.

  Before the court was James Melia of Diamor, Crossakeel, Kells and he was charged with causing procuring or assisting in fighting or baiting of animals.  Gardai submitted that the footage from the helicopter and ordinance survey maps had identified the townland in question as Diamor.

  However, after a submission by the defendant’s counsel Judge Brophy ruled that the correct townland was in fact Thomastown.

  Despite the dismissal, Judge Brophy congratulated the gardai on bringing the case before the court.

After the case, the Meath Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said it wanted those involved in such activities to know they would not get away with it.



Man who watched Co Kildare cock-fight fined £300

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched a cock-fight in a Co Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs.

  The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, which was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured.

  Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse.

  Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10.45 a.m. on July 6th, 1997.  Giving evidence yesterday, Garda Fahy said Dunne’s Nissan Primera car had been found parked near the location of the cock-fight at Grangemageny. Two bags with one cockerel inside each were discovered at the rear of the car, he said.

  Hugh Behan, who was convicted in February in relation to the same incident, said he had met and spoken with Dunne in the market at Athy. Dunne said there was “an exhibition” of birds taking place on that Sunday morning, and he agreed to go with him.

  After the Garda had arrived at the field, Behan said he had to be helped over a gate. But he insisted that he saw no cock-fighting take place and denied that Dunne had any cockerels in his car.

  Dunne told the court that he sat in a ditch after the Garda arrived at the field, and that he stayed there for four hours. He admitted being present at the incident, but denied cruelty charges.

  Judge Mary Martin fined Dunne £200 and ordered him to pay £100 towards veterinary expenses.  The case was adjourned to June 9th, to allow the fine to be paid.

  After the hearing the Irish Council Against Bloodsports expressed deep disappointment at the fine and said laughter from the public gallery during the case suggested that the cock-fighting incident had not been taken seriously.

  “It was treated like a joke and trivialised. It is a sad day for those who campaign against cruelty to animals,” said a spokeswoman, Ms Aideen Yourell.




Man who watched Co. Kildare cock-fight fined £300.

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched cock-fight in a Co. Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs. The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, whic6h was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured. Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co. Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse. Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10:45am on July 6th, 1997.



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC, 10/12/2013

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting.

  The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations.

  There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing.

  At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels.

  A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed.

  Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.


Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border.

  At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh.

  On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring.

  These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.

  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.

Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.