Cattle

Man gets jail on angel dust charges.
Irish Times, 22/10/1996.
A Beef farmer with 200 acres in Co. Tipperary has been sentenced to six months imprisonment for possessing angel dust and other illegal hormones on dates between September, 1993, and February, 1995. see more


Raid netted biggest ever seizure of animal drugs.
Irish Independent, 30/4/1997.

A 62-year-old Kildare man has been sentenced to eight months in jail and fined a total of £22,000 for importing and selling "Angel Dust" and other illegal substances. Newbridge District Court heard the raid which led to yesterday's prosecution netted the biggest seizure of prohibited substances in the history of the State.  see more


The Sun/The Mirror, 15/05/2001

(only main points)

Cornelius Keane, (37) Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co.Cork was jailed for three years at Cork Circuit case for injecting cattle with slurry to claim TB compensation. He took slurry from pits and injected into forty-nine cattle leaving them with lumps half the size of a football. Mr.Keane stood to gain £900 a month compensation for as long as his herd was confined to the farm. It was reported that Mr.Keane owned money to his bank and he stood to gain about £25.000 from the fraud.


Fraud, Fraud and More Fraud

Farmers Journal, 19/05/2001 (Letters)

The latest scandal to rock the farming community is the jailing of a young Cork farmer who is a former nominee for the Young Dairy Farmer of the Year Award. Cornelius Keane from Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co. Cork, was jailed for three years for unmercifully injecting his cattle slurry in order to defraud the state of ₤20,000 in bovine TB compensation. Keane (37) injected a lethal concoction of caustic soda and slurry into his 49-strong herd. According to Judge AG Murphy this act of cruelty merited a lifetime ban from farming and a severe prison sentence. The effect of the injections on the herd was graphically described in court by senior veterinary inspector John Murray. He told how he found cattle with swellings the size of Gaelic footballs on their necks. The swellings were oozing poisonous puss and causing severe pain to the animals.


Irish Examiner, Daily Mirror, 9/6/2001

(main points)

Joe Meaney, (54) of Cappamore, Crusheen, Clare was jailed for one year and fined £3,000 for removing Department of Agriculture ear tags from two cattle and attaching them to completely different animals. He then sold the animals to another farmer in September 1999, making about £200. Mr.Meaney, a millionaire farmer pleaded not guilty to the charges at Ennis District Court on the 8/06/01.


Farmer fined 11,427 Euro for using banned cattle drugs.

Irish Times, 16/10/2002
Abscesses on the carcasses of animals being processed in a meat export plant alerted the Department of Agriculture and Food to the use of banned hormone growth-promoters by a Meath farmer, Dunshaughlin Court heard yesterday.  see more

Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer's last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002.
A Judge issued his final warning to an elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O'Sullivan, 78, from Doonass, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O'Donnell told O'Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her farm wasn't depopulated within a fortnight. O'Sullivan's solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not willing to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. Judge O'Donnell released O'Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.


Evening Herald, 28/03/2003

Beef farmer, Joe Earley, Castle Manor, Drogheda Co.Louth was sentenced to two year’s imprisonment on six charges relating to use of illegal growth hormones and misuse of cattle identity tags. Det Garda Gerry Nohilly of Mullingar said Earley would use the hormones on other people’s cattle and offered a service where he would provide the cattle and the illegal hormones if they wished. Earley also put false identity tags on cattle so he could claim cash from the Department of Agriculture on them.


Irish Examiner, 05/05/2003

(Main parts of the article)

Patsy Costello, aged 63 of Anbally, Crummer, Tuam Co.Galway pleaded guilty to leaving the dead animal (a bull) lying above ground in a field for two weeks. Superintendent Martin Lee told Tuam Co.Galway District Court (3/05/03) the accused had two previous convictions for cruelty to animals and one for assault of a neighbour. Judge John Garavan imposed a fine of €400 and warned that the defendant was lucky not to be going to prison given his previous convictions.


Two brothers charged with animal cruelty

Irish Time, 25/9/2003

Mervyn Walsh, Ballyvadden, Gorey, Co Wexford appeared at Enniscorthy District Court yesterday having failed to appear on six previous occasions in relation to animal cruelty charges after returning from Kenya following the foot and mouth outbreak. Judge Donnchadh Obuachalla handed down the three month suspended prison sentence and ordered that the defendant is not a fit person to be in control of livestock including sheep. His brother William Walsh of the same address who was present in court having also returned from Kenya was fined €1,000 in relation to an animal cruelty charge. Supt Pat Delaney told the court the cruelty offences took place over two years ago after the defendants’ entire herd had been culled by the DOA. The brothers failed to bury a number of cattle carcases that were left lying on the land, he said.


Cattle ring is smashed.

Sunday World, 05/10/2003

A huge cattle smuggling racket along the border has been smashed. The DOA has discovered that false ear tags are being used for animals being smuggled and offered for sale and that the racketterrs are also using identity cards which don’t belong to animals being sold into the Irish meat chain. A number of farmers and cattle dealers in the border counties of Monaghan, Cavan, Louth and Donegal are being quizzed in connection with the racket.


Farmers injected cattle with slurry to feign TB.

Irish Examiner, 2000

Two farmers injected slurry into cattle to provoke positive reactions to bovine TB tests in a bid to get the State to pay thousands of pounds in compensation. see more


Garda smelled cruelty from road

Irish Examiner, 19/12/2002
A rural garda literally smelled animal cruelty as he passed a farm in North Cork and on investigation he found 47 dead cattle and many more malnourished cows standing among the carcases.  see more


Farm probe garda tells of ordeal with animals

Irish Examiner, 04/01/2002
A garda investigating the suspected neglect of cattle on a farm in Cork had to arm himself with a pike as the animals approached him in the yard, a court was told yesterday.  see more


Guilty of neglecting animal

Kildare Nationalist, 19/05/2000

A farmer who cruelly ill-treated a cow was told to pay £120 to the vet who carried out an examination on behalf of the gardaí, Athy District Court heard last week.  see more


The Sun/The Mirror, 15/5/2001

 (main points)

Cornelius Keane, (37) Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co.Cork was jailed for three years at Cork Circuit case for injecting cattle with slurry to claim TB compensation. He took slurry from pits and injected into forty-nine cattle leaving them with lumps half the size of a football. Mr.Keane stood to gain £900 a month compensation for as long as his herd was confined to the farm. It was reported that Mr.Keane owned money to his bank and he stood to gain about £25.000 from the fraud.


Irish Examiner/Daily Mirror, 09/06/2001

 (main points)

Joe Meaney, (54) of Cappamore, Crusheen, Clare was jailed for one year and fined £3,000 for removing Department of Agriculture ear tags from two cattle and attaching them to completely different animals. He then sold the animals to another farmer in September 1999, making about £200. Mr.Meaney, a millionaire farmer pleaded not guilty to the charges at Ennis District Court on the 8/06/01.


Cattle trader jailed over illegal tags and growth hormones.

Irish Independent, 28/03/2003

A cattle dealer who put false tags on cattle in order to claim subsidies was jailed for two years yesterday. Dundalk Circuit Criminal Court heard of how Joe Early, Drogheda but originally from Meath had specially adapted vice grips to remove cattle tags and place them on other animals. He was making a profit of around 127e an animal and had been doing this for 2 to 3 years. He used a stolen stamp to certify animals were clear of TB or Brucellosis. He traded between 1500 and 2000 animals but not all would have been tampered with.


Farmers Convicted over TB deceit

Irish Times, 1/12/2000

Two Co. Cork farmers received suspended prison sentences and were fined yesterday when they appeared at Macroom District Court charged with injecting slurry into cattle, so as to alter the accuracy of TB testing.  see more


Farmer pleads guilty to cattle movement charges

Examiner, 17/11/2001 

The father of top jockey Norman Williamson was yesterday fined £1,000, ordered to pay £1,535 witness expenses and £500 costs after pleading guilty to charges relating to the illegal movement of cattle.  see more


Trial over as BSE fraud pair change their pleas to guilty

Examiner, 17/11/2001 

The BSE fraud trial ended dramatically yesterday when the West Cork father and son changed their pleas to "Guilty".  see more



Farmer arrested for animal cruelty as he attempted to flee State

Kilkenny Advertiser, 18/12/2009

A Kilkenny farmer was arrested as he attempted to leave the State after he was charged with cruelty to animals and with leaving nine dead animals rotting on his farm.

Simon O’Dwyer (63), of Garrue, Knockmoylan, Mullinavat, Co Kilkenny, was charged with four counts of cruelty to animals and with three counts of failing to dispose of animal carcasses.  He appeared before Kilkenny District Court this week.

The court heard Mr O’Dwyer had “abandoned” his farm and that seven dead horses and two dead cows were discovered by gardaí on his land on four dates between January and December 2009.  The court heard that Mr O’ Dwyer was arrested on Monday at Castleblayney, Co Monaghan, crossing into Northern Ireland in an attempt to leave the jurisdiction.  Mr O’Dwyer’s son, Simon (26), is also charged with two counts of cruelty and with one count of failing to dispose of a carcass but he failed to appear before the court and a bench warrant was issued for his arrest.

The father is also charged with failing to appear at Birr District Court in October 2009 on charges of theft from an equestrian supply shop in Birr, Co Offaly, in May 2008.

Garda Shane Elliffe, of Thomastown Garda station, said that when charged Mr O’Dwyer replied, “I wasn’t there, nobody told me they were dead. The place is for sale but there is nobody to buy it.”  Michael Lanigan, solicitor for Mr O’Dwyer, said the offences relate to “an abandonment of a farm”, and applied for legal aid.

Insp Brennan made an application for bail, however, this was refused on the basis of “the circumstances of his arrest” and on the basis of a warrant being issued for failing to appear at a previous court sitting.

Judge William Harnett remanded Mr O’Dwyer in custody to appear at Castlecomer District Court on December 21 next.



Cruelty probe

Dromore Leader, 26/1/2010

A FARM at Edentrillick Road, Dromore, is at the centre of a police and USPCA investigation into alleged animal cruelty.  see more



Neglectful farmer escapes jail over cruelty to cattle

Irish Independent, 1/06/2005

A farmer who has starved his cattle to death was told yesterday he would have to apply to the courts if he was ever to be allowed have livestock in his care again.

David Coffey of Newgrove, Kilrickle, Co Galway, escaped jail after admitting charges of animal cruelty and failing to properly register his herd. Coffey appeared at Loughrea Circuit Court yesterday, appealing at eight-month jail term handed down at Ballinasloe District Court.

Department of Agriculture vet Elizabeth O’Flynn told the court that, in conjunction with the ISPCA, she inspected Coffey’s herd on February 2 last year.

The 60 animals showed signs of starvation. They were bellowing for food and there was no evidence of feed or shelter. There were carcases on the land. Some cattle showed extreme weakness and one died shortly after the visit. Ms O’Flynn said Coffey admitted he had not had a vet out for 14 months.

Neither tags nor registration of animals were in place and Ms O’Flynn issued a regulatory notice compelling him to address the problems. He agreed to do so immediately.

On numerous subsequent visits Ms O’Flynn said there was little change. Some beasts had to be put down. Further notices were issued.

Defence counsel told Judge Raymond Groarke Coffey was very depressed, but his condition had only been properly diagnosed recently. Judge Groarke accepted Coffey was ill. He had heard many such cases in court but had never yet heard one where there was not a psychic reason.

The court heard Coffey had disposed of his cattle.

The judge said he would suspend sentence and proposed to prohibit Coffey from holding animals without applying to court to see if he was fit to do so. He adjourned sentence to finalise the prohibition wording.



Raid netted biggest ever seizure of animal drugs

Irish Independent, 30/04/1997

A 62-year-old Kildare man has been sentenced to eight months in jail and fined a total of £22,000 for importing and selling “Angel Dust” and other illegal substances. Newbridge District Court heard the raid which led to yesterday’s prosecution netted the biggest seizure of prohibited substances in the history of the State. Former businessman, Diarmuid O’keeffe, of Cutbush, The Curragh, pleaded guilty to a total of 22 charges involving the illegal import, sale and possession of Clenbuterol (Angel Dust), antibiotics and hormones in two separate locations in Kildare and Newbridge on a number of dates in September 1991. Senior Department of Agriculture officials told the court that the substances seized were used to increase the value of cattle but posed serious risks to human health. The raid netted 771 litres of Clenbuterol and 26 kilos of the same drug in powder form. There were also 500 bottles of hormone cocktails and 6,500 doses of hormone pellets. The quantity seized was enough to dose 20,000 animals. That figure didn’t include other substances found in the mixing plant. The value of the substances, which were the subject of the charges, was £230,000 on the black market. The value of the other substances seized, but not the subject of the charges, was £196,000.



Farmer fined 11,427 Euro for using banned cattle drugs

Irish Times, 16/10/2002

Abscesses on the carcasses of animals being processed in a meat export plant alerted the Department of Agriculture and Food to the use of banned hormone growth-promoters by a Meath farmer, Dunshaughlin Court heard yesterday. The farmer, James McDernitt (54), Blackhills, Kilmoon, Ashbourne, Co. Meath, pleaded guilty yesterday to eight charges of possessing the hormone-treated animals and one of failing to keep a proper record of the movement of the animals between April and July 2000. McDermott, described as a substantial farmer by Mr. Patrick MacEntee SC, defending, was given a six-month suspended prison sentence, fined a total of 11,427 Euro plus 750 Euro in costs and ordered to keep the peace for 2 years. On the 3rd of April 2000 Mr. John Larkin from the Department of Agriculture noticed abscesses on the rib cages of animals belonging to the defendant which had been processes at the plant. Examination of the carcasses found needle marks 3-4 inches deep. It was established that one of the animals had been treated with anabolic steroids, a triple cocktail of banned drugs, including one which was new to the department. On April 10th, 2000, McDermott submitted 11 more cattle for slaughter and, when tested, six were found to be positive. Three months later, when animals from the defendant’s farm were being slaughtered under permit, the cocktail of drugs was found again in one of the animals. One of the drugs used in the cocktail was Stanozonol, which causes depression and damage to the immune system in humans. Mr. Flaherty told Judge John Brophy that McDermott was a substantial farmer, and sold 1,000 cattle a year and received 24,795 in EU subsidies last year.



Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer’s last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002

A judge issued his final warning to elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O’Sullivan, 78, from Doonaas,, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O’Donnell told O’Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her harm wasn’t depopulated within a fortnight. O’Sullivan’s solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not wiling to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. The court also heard from Mary Bourke, a Department of Agriculture vet, that 23 cattle from the farm had been slaughtered last Thursday and that 17 would be removed next week. The court also heard the department was giving O’Sullivan one last chance to sell the rest of the herd or they would be removed and slaughtered by Christmas under EU regulations. Judge O’Donnell released O’Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.



Cattle trader jailed over illegal tags and growth hormones

Irish Independent, 28/03/2003

A cattle dealer who put false identity tags on cattle in order to claim subsidies was jailed for two years yesterday.  see more



Cruel farmer who injected cows with slurry in fraud attempt get three-year jail sentence

Irish Examiner, 15/05/2001

A farmer, who injected his cattle with slurry in an attempt to give them TB so he could claim a slaughter grant from the Department of Agriculture, was jailed for three years yesterday.  see more 



Cruelty to animals

Sun, 11/02/1999

An elderly west of Ireland woman was jailed in three months at Athenry District Court yesterday for cruelty to animals after the court heard that over 30 of her cattle have died from malnutrition since December.

Mary Ciles, Kiltrogue, Claregalway, Co. Galway was also banned from holding livestock for five years. The woman had also been convicted for cruelty to animals in 1993.



Women let cows die

Sun, 11/02/1999

A cruel woman farmer was jailed for three months yesterday after a court heard how she allowed 34 of her 56-strong herd of cows to die in just eight weeks.

Mary Giles, who is in her 60s, was also banned from keeping cattle for five years.

It was her second conviction for cruelty, the district court at Athenry, Co. Galway, was told.

She had been banned from keeping livestock following her previous appearance in 1993.

Giles, from Claregalway, Co Galway, denied neglecting the animals and claimed she provided them with 210 bales of hay every week.



Farmer pays the price - £21,000 fine for using angel dust

Irish Independent, 02/02/1999

A judge warned yesterday of the “most serious nature” of using illegal animal growth promoting substances when he fined a Co Tipperary beef farmer a total of £21,000.  see more



The Derry farm neglect that leaves horses to die like this.

Sunday People, 20/02/2000

see more


Smuggled cattle may be source of BSE

Sunday Independent, 14/01/2001

The Irish beef industry is bracing itself for another major scandal with the revelation that hundreds and possibly thousands of cattle, untested for Mad Cow Disease and with forged papers, have illegally entered the food chain in the Republic.  see more



Cattle left to rot on horror farm

Part-time farmer to be quizzed after 450 starving cows were found stuffed into shed

Sunday World, 15/11/1998

see more


Cattle cruelty king’s luxury mansion

Sunday World, 21/11/1999

Roly-poly part-time farmer Thomas Greene – exposed for cruelty to animals on his own farm – is building a fairy-tale mansion on top of a hill.  see more



500 cattle to be put down at horror farm

Sunday World, 14/02/1999

The cruel part-time farmer who left hundreds of stock to rot and die is set to have his herd of 500 cattle put down.

see more 


Roscommon AI man fined

Irish Farmers Journal, 04/12/2004

A Roscommon man has been fined €250 and ordered to pay €3,200 in costs and expenses after admitting to Roscommon District court for operating an unlicensed AI business with 300 farmer clients.

Richard Kenny of Mount Talbot, Roscommon also received three separate fines of €250 each for possession of two fertility drugs and carrying out unauthorised trading in bovine semen.

The case arose following a raid on the defendant’s farm by the Department of Agriculture in October, 2002.



Farmer raided for angel dust fined £5,000

Irish Independent, 30/05/1997

A farmer convicted of possessing the illegal growth promoter Clembuterol – commonly known as angel dust – was fined a total of £5,000 yesterday.

  Eamon Heagney (32) of Tully House, Eyrecourt, Co Galway, was also convicted by Judge Mary Fahy of possessing a hormone implant gun, sheep sponges and other prohibited substances at Eyrecourt on October 23 1991.

  Athlone court heard Heagney was joint owner of a farm of 2,000 sheep and 100 cattle and ran a fattening operation with his brother Con.

  A team of Department of Agriculture veterinary officers who searched the farm on foot af [sic] a warrant discovered a box of Clembuterol hidden in a shed wall recess.

  The hormone implant gun and other items were found in other sheds.

  Defending barrister Brendan Grehan said a large sheep fattening operation was going on at the farm. Heagney had developed a lucrative contract with a Spanish importer for supply of meat involving a huge capital investment but the entire contract was wiped out as a result of “what happened.”

  Paying tribute to the media’s role in highlighting “cases of this nature,” the judge fined Heagney £1,000 on each of five summonses.

  A number of similar summonses against Con Heagney of the same address were adjourned to July 28 for a hearing date.



Cow with serious wounds put down

Irish Times, 27/10/2006

Gardai in Salthill are investigating an attack on a cow which was found with both ears cut off outside Spiddal, Co Galway. The animal had to be put down after it was found with serious head wounds in what appears to have been a makeshift grave. A passerby alerted the Galway Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The GSPCA and gardai are appealing for anyone with information to phone (091) 56361 or (091) 521333


Holy cow! It looks like a ritual killing

Irish Independent, 27/01/2005

The remains of another cow – the third in a month – have been found in a Kilkenny city laneway, heightening fears of a ritual killing of cattle campaign.

  Gardai reckon that a professional has been used to butcher the animals. The latest discovery contained parts of a bovine spinal cord, which is specified risk material and must be disposed of under licence.

  The Co Council has asked the gardai to investigate because of the threat to public health. It has also issued a public health warning in conjunction with the local Health Service and the Department of Agriculture.

  The public are being asked to be wary of any offers of meat from an unlicenced source.

  The latest discovery near the junction of Old Callan Road and Walkin Street was made last Thursday.

  The authorities are puzzled about where the cattle came from as each cow born in the country has an identity tag.




Cruel Farmer Wants Votes

Irish News of the World, 22/03/2009

A famer, sentenced to four months in jail for “utterly awful” cruelty to animals, is running for a county council seat.  Tyre dealer Richard Smith’s crimes were so extreme, the LSPCA asked he be given a lifetime ban from herding animals.  But Smith, 48, has now announced he will contest the Adare electoral area of Limerick in June’s local vote.

  In January, Smith, who owns Richie Tyres in Kilmallock Road, Limerick, was convicted of cruelty at his farm at Lemonfield, Crecora.  He admitted two counts of cruelty cows and not tending his herd on March 15 last year.

  The jail sentence is currently under appeal but Smith is not denying the seriousness of what happened.


Ashamed

He said: “It was a very dark period in my life and it is something I will be ashamed of for the rest of my life. I stand by my guilty plea and there is no question of me not holding my hands up to what happened.”

   Limerick District Court heard that one badly-injured cow had its back legs tied to a tractor and was dragged through a field and left to die.  Other animals were starving and rotting carcases were left lying in sheds and in the farm yard.

  Judge Tom O’Donnell, who handled the case, said deplorable pain and suffering had been inflicted on Smith’s herd.  He described the offences as “utterly awful” and said the pictures of he ill-treated animals were among the most upsetting he had ever come across.

  If elected as an Independent councillor Smith says he will mount a campaign for the introduction of a compulsory retirement age of 65 for politicians. He also wants bin collections to be taken over by the local authority.

  Mr Smith said: “I believe in public service for the people. My family has a long connection with politics and it is something I always wanted to do. I believe I can give something back to society without costing a fortune.


Valuable

“I am a people person and I believe that I have a valuable contribution to make to the process. I believe I can bring an open voice to the table and conviction on matters that I would be fairly passionate about. At the end of the day, I am a bread and butter person and things like maintaining roads and encouraging businesses within the Adare electoral area would be important to me.”



Farmer charged over cruel treatment of cattle

Evening Herald, 20/02/2004

A county Cavan farmer has appeared in court on charges of allegedly causing cruelty to a number of cattle at Redhills on May 13 last year.

  John Emmo, Earlsvale Road, Cavan, faced a charge of cruelly ill-treating 13 cattle and allowing dead livestock to remain unburied.

The case was adjourned to April 20 after the accused’s brother Shay Emmo gave an undertaking that he would assist in looking after animals on the farm in the future.



Cruelty rap farmers jailed

The Star, 20/10/2006

A farmer convicted of animal cruelty has been sentenced to 28 days’ jail – while the State confiscates the entire stock of his farm.

  Martin McAndrew of Cornhill, Pollatomas north Mayo had earlier been ordered to dispose of all of his cattle and sheep within six weeks. But when he appeared again before Belmullet District Court he agreed he still had 25 sheep and 25 cattle, as well as “four pet sheep.”

  An Agriculture Department inspector who visited the farm on October 2 said many of the animals were lame, emaciated and blind.

  Judge Mary Devins fined McAndrew €500 for “cruel ill-treatment of a cow” and €200 for littering and sentenced him to 28 days’ jail so officials could confiscate the remaining animals. Recognisance in the event of an appeal was fixed at €3,000.



Cattle ‘injected with slurry’

Irish Independent, 04/05/1999

A farmer who allegedly injected his cattle with slurry in an attempt to have them classed as TB reactors, is being investigated by the Department of Agriculture.

  It is understood the investigation was launched by officials after they became suspicious at the number of TB reactors turning up on the man’s farm in the Mid-Cork area earlier this year.

  Dept officials monitoring the farm, allegedly spotted the farmer injecting a cow from a bucket of slurry, in between two visits by a vet carrying out TB tests. A syringe and other items were seized and the animal impounded.

  Gardai were called in to preserve the scene. According to informed sources, injecting a cow with slurry would result in lumps similar to those which show up in an animal after TB tests.

  “This guy was very clever – he had shown up one or two reactors before this and was building up gradually,” said one source.

According to one source, poor cattle prices due to the winter fodder shortage made the prospec6to of £400 to £600 per animal from the Department in compensation payments an extremely attractive temptation.

A Dept spokesman confirmed a case was being prosecuted against a farmer for interfering with TB tests with a view to defrauding the Dept.



Farm couple face animal drugs charges

Irish Independent, 07/02/2002

A bottle containing an illegal cattle growth promoter was found in a famer’s wardrobe, a court heard yesterday.

  Department of Agriculture veterinary inspectors also discovered two bottles of illegal antibiotics stored in the farmer’s kitchen fridge at Ballindollaghan, Lissalway, Castlerea, Co Roscommon.

  James Brady (36) and his wife Mary are before Ballyhaunis District Court on summonses alleging they had possessions of animal remedies without a licence on July 25, 2000, contrary to the 1993 Animal Remedies Act. Both defendants deny the charges.

The bottles taken from the fridge were found to contain an antibiotic, oxytetracycline. The bottle taken from the wardrobe contained oestradiol benzoate and nortestosterone deconate, the court heard. The case continues today


Remanded on cattle tags conviction

Irish Independent, 08/02/2001

A Cork livestock worker yesterday pleaded guilty to possessing implements adapted for the removal of ear-tags from cattle originating in Northern Ireland.

  Liam Morgan (43) from 41 Richmond Court, Bandon, Co Cork, admitted in Cork Circuit Criminal Court to possessing the implements at Macroom Livestock Buyers premises on August 7, 1998.

Judge A G Murphy remanded the father-of-four in custody to appear again in two weeks for sentencing. The Court was told that the prosecution arose from a surveillance operation mounted by Gardai following receipt of information from Northern Ireland.



Cattle fraud is broken up

News of the World, 26/03/2006

A cattle-smuggling scam that put the public at risk has been stamped out.

  Last week in a special court in Carrickmacross, Co Monaghan, a farmer who admitted moving livestock without having the animals stock without having the animals properly tested was fined €4,500 and ordered to pay €5,300 costs.

  The prosecution of William Cranston of Skerrymore, Drumacrib, Co Monaghan, was the last in a series of cases that arose from a countrywide crack down on rogue cattle dealers.

  A Department of Agriculture vet, Brian Flaherty said yesterday that racketeering in the livestock industry puts everyone at risk.

One of the most serious aspects is that brucellosis can be transferred from livestock to humans, he added.



Judge adjourns case where cattle left to ‘die and starve’  

Times, 28/04/2009

John Maguire, Clonee House, Ederney, Co. Fermanagh faced a number of charges in relation to failing to record the movements of his cattle on the holdings, having wrong tag numbers in breach of Bovine TB and Brucellosis in Cattle Orders, failing to collect the carcasses of six cattle which died in some manner other than by having been slaughtered.  

  The offences are alleged to have happened on dates in October 2006, and February and June 2007.  

  Having view photographic evidence of rotting carcasses, Judge McLaughlin expressed the view that animals were left to “die and basically starve”.

  The case was adjourned until May 6th.



Cattle export story

Irish Examiner, 04/11/2014  

Greed was behind a fraud by one of Ireland’s biggest cattle exporters which saw diseased cattle delivered to Morocco.

  Paperwork indicating that the animals were healthy had caused potential reputational damage to the industry, a sentencing judge said yesterday.

  Judge David Riordan warned he would impose a four-year jail sentence on David Hunter, aged 61, of Castlekeun, Mallow, Co Cork if a €50,000 fine was not paid by December 1, 2015, and a further €50,000 by December 1, 2016.

  The judge said the potential reputational damage to the industry was “very serious”.

  Defence barrister Donal O’Sullivan said he did not know if Hunter would be able to pay the fines which could put him out of business.

  A co-accused Joan Stafford, aged 47, of 18 Nano Nagle Place, Killavullen, Co Cork, worked for 20 years for the Hunter family and it was claimed she was “brow-beaten” into taking part.

  She was given a two-and-a-half-year suspended sentence and a 240-hour community service order on two charges.

  Sgt Shane Davern said the Moroccan authorities discovered diseased animals exported by Hunter that had been certified as healthy according to the documentation in August 2011.

  The sergeant said Hunter did co-operate with the subsequent investigation but he said there had been a dogged investigation by Department of Agriculture veterinary inspector Mary Cullinane.

  The sergeant said that when Ireland’s total live exports stood at 400,000 cattle per year, Hunter was exporting 10% of that amount — 40,000 animals.

  Sgt Davern said after 15 years without an Irish live cattle export to Morocco, serious efforts had been made by officers of the Departments of Agriculture and Foreign Affairs to establish the market.

  The Moroccan authorities were particularly concerned about keeping out two bovine diseases, namely IBR and BVD.

  A total of 120 cattle were exported to Morocco on June 30, 2011, by Hunter. Twelve of them tested positive in Morocco and had to be slaughtered.

  Judge Riordan noted: “Mr Hunter, with the assistance of Ms Stafford to a greater or lesser degree, sought to circumvent the conditions attached to the importation of live cattle to the Moroccan market.

  “In doing so they created a situation with the Moroccan authorities.

  “It is hugely regrettable that after the efforts made by the Irish authorities to open up this market, that the likes of Mr Hunter would put those markets in jeopardy. They do create a difficulty and affect the national economy. “These are crimes motivated primarily by greed. I see these offences as coming within the higher end of the scale in terms of deception.

  “An aggravating factor is putting in jeopardy the live export market.

  “Certification must have an integrity. The use of certificates in the manner described completely unwinds the system. It is hoped the Department of Agriculture has tightened up since 2011.”

  Sgt Davern said there were three kinds of fraud involved:

  Switching blood tests for healthy animals with those which had diseases; Presenting documentation to give the impression some diseased animals were being kept out; Changing a computerised form changing the word “positive” to “negative” in respect of animals for export.

  The sergeant said that the system had depended on an element of trust.

  Randall Hall BL said Ms Stafford lived in a council house and did not profit from what was done. He said she had felt brow-beaten into doing what she did.

  But Sgt Davern said that she had a hands-on involvement and played a very important part in the process.

  Both accused pleaded guilty at Cork Circuit Criminal Court to various charges.

  Hunter admitted presenting cattle for export with false declarations on April 7 and June 30, 2011.

  Ms Stafford pleaded guilty to a charge in 2011 in which nine animal tag numbers on a list were falsified to show they corresponded to disease free animals, and furthermore, on June 30, 2011, she used a list containing three altered cattle tag numbers.



Financial problems leads to animal cruelty

Advertiser.ie, 25/02/2011

Five animals, including a calf, died and were scavenged on a Mullingar farm when their 25-year-old owner’s financial pressures became too much for him.

  Marc Finnegan of Readypenny, Dundalk, County Louth, was given a six month suspended sentence for leaving a carcass unburied on rented land at Joristown, Mullingar last year.

  Animal cruelty charges were taken into consideration at Mullingar District Court, with Judge Eamon O’Brien describing photographs of the scene as horrific and appalling.

  The court heard Finnegan, who had been farming for six years with his father, had borrowed heavily at the height of the boom to develop his herd and an agricultural contracting business.

  When clients didn’t pay him, he spiralled into “dire financial circumstances”, solicitor Chynel Phelan explained, and this led him to stop making rational decisions.

  Garda Enda Brown described a large number of underfed, malnourished animals when he visited the 180 acre farm on January 18 last.

  A heifer and cow had to be put down by Department of Agriculture veterinary inspector Jonathan Cooney, including a limousin cow which had been left in a ditch for a number of days with no food or water.

  Carcasses, some of which were extensively scavenged, had been left for days with one partially under plastic and one submerged in a small stream.

  A limousine calf left unburied for more than a week had been scavenged to the point where there was nothing left to remove, the inspector said.

  He became aware of the farm when its owners complained that Finnegan had overstayed his lease there.

  At the time Finnegan had up to 106 animals there, which in good condition would have been worth up to €90,000, the inspector said.

  He had reduced his total herd from 300 to less than 50 and the inspector said it was the department’s objective that Finnegan end his involvement in farming.

  Ms Phelan said her client’s local vet described him as an honest and genuine farmer who overstretched himself by putting so much effort into building up his herd.

  Finnegan suffers with anxiety, she said and knowledge of what he had done did not sit easily with him.

  It happened at a time when weather was particularly bad and roads between the farm and his home almost 80 miles away were often impassable. 

  He is utterly embarrassed and ashamed and very remorseful, she said and pointed out that Finnegan faces further summonses relating to the death of some of the animals which were later removed from the farm.

  Judge O’Brien expressed his surprise that Finnegan had no herdsman locally to mind the animals for him and suspended the six month sentence for two years.



Wild heifer shot dead at Kilmallock mart

Independent.ie, 13/08/2014

A LIMERICK mart was forced to shoot a heifer that became completely unmanageable during its weekly sale at Kilmallock last week.

  Mart manager, PJ Buckley made the decision to shoot the Limousin heifer in the interests of public health and safety.

  Over 1,000 animals were going under the hammer at Kilmallock on the day and over 200 buyers were present at the time of the incident which happened just after lunchtime at Monday's sale last week.

  The last time such drastic action was required at Kilmallock was over 12 years ago, according to mart spokesman, Denis Buckley.

  The heifer, which was one of a draft sent to the mart by a local farmer, became unruly in her pen and broke out into the coral area which adjoins the mart.

  Several attempts by mart staff to coax the unruly animal back into her pen were unsuccessful and soon it became obvious that drastic action would have to be considered.

  "The animal could have crossed an area which was used by staff and people attending the mart and as you know humans and animals do not match in this type of situation," explained Mr Kirby.

  "There have been too many farm accidents this year and the mart was not going to be responsible for another agri-related accident. It all became a question of being safe rather than sorry," he added.

When it became obvious that the animal could not be restrained the mart called in a competent local rifleman, and he dispatched the heifer into a ditch adjoining the pens with a single shot.

  Buyers and sellers attending the mart were unaware of what was going on outside and business at the weekly sale was unaffected by the incident.

  Similar Limousin heifers currently command an average price of €1,100 and the mart management subsequently came to an agreement with the vendor farmer on compensation for the shot heifer.

  The remaining animals in the farmer's draft were successfully sold later at the mart.

"This is a very rare incident. The animal was not kicking 
or bawling but became completely unmanageable," said Mr Kirby.