Animal Fighting

Judge orders cock fight duo to pay fines.

Irish Independent, 25/3/1998

Two men were ordered to pay ₤200 each to the ISPCA when they admitted attending a cockfight.  see more

Sick punters lay bets on cat fighting.

Sunday People, 11/06/2000.
Sick gamblers behind outrageous animal fights in Ireland have sunk to a new low - using CATS. At least one group of illegal dog fight organisers recently provided twisted punters with a bloody sideshow: cats being ripped to shreds by vicious dogs. A source who witnessed the sickening blood-bath in Co. Antrim said as many as a DOZEN terrified cats died horrible deaths after being released into pens with enraged Lurchers. The cats were thrown into large pens which had wire mesh over the top, so punters could watch, but the cats couldn't escape," said one punter. "It was wholesale slaughter. I would bet on dog fighting, but this was sick. Those cats didn't have a chance." According to the source, any cats not killed outright had their necks broken by 'pit attendants'.


Dog Fighting case adjourned

Irish Times, 8/10/2004

The case against 12 men charged with running an illegal dog fight was adjourned at Nass District Court yesterday. Solicitor Mr.Eoin O'Connor, who is representing some of the defendants, said he needed more time to get legal advice considering the number of clients and the amount of evidence involved. Judge Murrough Connellan adjourned the case to November 17th. The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st 2003, at Broclagh, Roberstown, Co.Kildare. The men have all been charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911. The defendants are: Mr.Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle Co.Meath, Mr.Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown Carlow, Mr.Troy Jordan, River Road, Allenwood Co.Kildare, Mr.James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co.Kildare, Mr.Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road Carlow, Mr.Paul Malone, Dunmore Lawn, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.Karl Bree, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin, Co.Dublin, Mr.John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templogue, Co.Dublin, Mr.Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, Co.Dublin, Mr.Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimagh, Co.Dublin Mr.Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham,Co.Dublin.

  

Fears of cock-fighting ring after birds found dumped

Irish Examiner, 02/08/2011

ANIMAL welfare groups are concerned there may be a cock-fighting ring operating in the Dundalk area after a number of injured cocks and other fighting birds were found dumped.  see more 



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC News, 10/12/2013

Cock-fighting is a practice that has been illegal for almost 200 years.  

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting. The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations. There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing. At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels. A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed. Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.

Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border. At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh. On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring. These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.  Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.



Sick punters lay bets on cat fighting

Sunday People, 11/06/2000

Sick gamblers behind outrageous animal fights in Ireland have sunk to a new low – using CATS. At least one group of illegal dog fight organisers recently provided twisted punters with a bloody sideshow: cats being ripped to shred by vicious dogs. A source who witnessed the sickening blood-bath in Co. Antrim said as many as a DOZEN terrified cats died horrible deaths after being released into pens with enraged Lurchers – a breed of dog more traditionally associated with racing and rabbit hunting. The events are taking place on both sides of the border.

  “The cats were thrown into large pens which had wire mesh over the top, so punters could watch, but the cats couldn’t escape,“ said one punter. “It was wholesale slaughter. I would bet on dog fighting, but this was sick. Those cats didn’t have a chance.”

  According to the source, any cats not killed outright had their necks broken by ‘pit attendants.’ He said fellow punters told him afterwards that some of the cats had tried to fight back.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

SAVAGE: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart tow blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.

And they spend five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brocklagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.  Five men were found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.


Offence

A jury in Naas district court found another man not guilty.  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondakin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all male jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.

  The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other by the neck,” Garda Steve Kinneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of € 12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Five men found guilty of ill-treating animals by attending dog fight

Irish Independent, 14/07/2005

Five men have been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight, in the first case of its kind in the state.  see more



History made as dog fight swoop lands handler in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.

  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in the history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Dreegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.



Man jailed for organising cruel and bloody dogfight

Irish Independent, 29/07/2005

A 35-year-old man has been jailed for 18 months for cruelty to animals during a dogfight in the first case of its kind in the State.

  Another four men were given suspended sentences and fined at Naas circuit court yesterday after being found guilty of cruelly ill-treating two animals in 2003.

  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, was jailed for 18 months by Judge Pat McCartan yesterday. It also emerged that he had previously been convicted and fined €6,475 for cruelty to six pitbull terriers found in neglect at his home.

  Yesterday’s sentencing was welcomed by the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) who said that the practice "is not acceptable in this day and age."

  The trial had heard that a team of gardai and inspectors from the ISPCA had raided a Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody clinch in a corrugated steel pen. The two pitbull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. Such was the ferocity of the fight between the dogs that a ladder was needed to separate them.

  Yesterday, Judge McCartan said it was a “mean and nasty offence where the animals were used for a purpose never designed”. The five men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals.

  All had pleaded not guilty to the charges. It is the first time that such a case has been heard in the State.

  Each of the men faced a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years imprisonment. Judge McCartan said he was “fairly certain” that but for the intervention of the Gardai, one or both of the dogs would have died in tht fight.

  There was also significant organisation in putting together the event by building the ring that was found and putting down a carpet so the dogs would have a better grip, he said.

  While Jordan now faces jail, Richard Somerville from Navan Road, Cabra, Dublin was ordered to pay €3,000 to the ISPCA and his sentence would be suspended.

Karl Breen of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin, Dublin received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the ISCPCA, while Thomas Codd of Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght had to pay €500 to have his none-month sentence suspended.

  David Deegan of Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght received an 18-month sentence on condition of a €5,000 payment to the animal welfare body.



Police seize fighting dogs after ‘training camp’ raid

Irish Independent, 07/01/2006

Around 60 dogs were last night seized by animal welfare and police officers as they raided a suspected training camp for fighting dogs.

  Pit bull terriers were among the dogs recovered during the operation in Co Down, about a mile from a puppy farm which was raided on Thursday night in Katesbridge.

  The Ulster Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA) and police recovered around 100 dogs during Thursday’s raid.

  The puppies were rescued from appalling conditions during a six-hour overnight operation. The original raid was sparked when boxer dogs were spotted feeding from the carcass of a cow.

  It is understood equipment used to train fighting dogs was also discovered in yesterday’s operation.

  A USPCA spokesperson said yesterday’s find was significant. “There appears to be a lot more pit bull terriers around these days,” he said. “They have been used for dog fighting.

  “The operation is continuing and it is likely there could be more discoveries.”

Vets were called in to examine the puppies recovered from Thursday night’s operation on a farm building at Katesbridge.

  The puppies have been sent to various locations across Northern Ireland and also included Jack Russells and other dogs.


Tougher laws

The find has prompted politicians to demand tougher laws, including criminal convictions, for cases of animal cruelty.

  Meanwhile, Limerick Animal Welfare organisation has launched an urgent appeal for homes for more than a dozen Christmas puppies abandoned in just under a week.  At least 12 dogs have been found abandoned in various parts of the city and county since last Friday and foster homes or permanent homes are being urgently sought.

  One pup recovered two days ago is just 10 months old and was picked up after he was knocked down while wandering the streets.

  Anyone who can offer a home to one of the abandoned Christmas puppies can contact Limerick Animal Welfare at 087 6371044 or 061 336740.



Cock-up over a summons

Irish Independent, 09/05/2003

A District Court judge threw out a charge against a man allegedly involved in a cockfight last summer.

  The case was dismissed at Kells court yesterday after the man’s solicitor successfully argued that the townland on the summons was incorrect.  However, Judge John Brophy indicated he would have considered imposing a jail term on the man if he had been convicted.

  The judge made his ruling after viewing video footage from the Garda Air Support Unit helicopter after it had come upon a group of about 30 people in Diamor, Kells, Co Meath on June 23.

  Before the court was James Melia of Diamor, Crossakeel, Kells and he was charged with causing procuring or assisting in fighting or baiting of animals.  Gardai submitted that the footage from the helicopter and ordinance survey maps had identified the townland in question as Diamor.

  However, after a submission by the defendant’s counsel Judge Brophy ruled that the correct townland was in fact Thomastown.

  Despite the dismissal, Judge Brophy congratulated the gardai on bringing the case before the court.

  After the case, the Meath Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said it wanted those involved in such activities to know they would not get away with it.



Man who watched Co Kildare cock-fight fined £300

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched a cock-fight in a Co Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs.

  The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, which was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured.

  Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse.

  Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10.45 a.m. on July 6th, 1997.  Giving evidence yesterday, Garda Fahy said Dunne’s Nissan Primera car had been found parked near the location of the cock-fight at Grangemageny. Two bags with one cockerel inside each were discovered at the rear of the car, he said.

  Hugh Behan, who was convicted in February in relation to the same incident, said he had met and spoken with Dunne in the market at Athy. Dunne said there was “an exhibition” of birds taking place on that Sunday morning, and he agreed to go with him.

  After the Garda had arrived at the field, Behan said he had to be helped over a gate. But he insisted that he saw no cock-fighting take place and denied that Dunne had any cockerels in his car.

  Dunne told the court that he sat in a ditch after the Garda arrived at the field, and that he stayed there for four hours. He admitted being present at the incident, but denied cruelty charges.

  Judge Mary Martin fined Dunne £200 and ordered him to pay £100 towards veterinary expenses.  The case was adjourned to June 9th, to allow the fine to be paid.

  After the hearing the Irish Counc6il Against Bloodsports expressed deep disappointment at the fine and said laughter from the public gallery during the case suggested that the cock-fighting incident had not been taken seriously.

  “It was treated like a joke and trivialised. It is a sad day for those who campaign against cruelty to animals,” said a spokeswoman, Ms Aideen Yourell.



It’s victory for the News of the World

News of the World, 28/01/2001

The Irish News of the Wold dealt a huge blow against dog fighting this week when two evil Mr Bigs admitted they were involved in the barbaric ‘sport.’

  Tony Mullen, 43, and Jeremy Brown, 41, pleaded guilty to dog fighting charges after being faced with overwhelming evidence. It was gathered during our five-month investigation which began in Dublin and end in justice.

  The probe exposed fighting dog breeders from Finglas to Limerick and a trail which led all the way over the water to England. Our damning dossier has now helped bring five men involved in the sick practice to justice.

  Mullen, of Birmingham – a known fan of Irish-bred pitbulls – admitted two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to his pitbull terrier Cracker, which suffered appalling injuries last March. He also admitted watching an organised fight. Brown, of Chesterfield admitted using a purpose-built pen at his allotment for fighting.

  In our probe, our three-man Dublin based team worked closely with Britain’s RSPCA officials and police officers who raided the pen and found a broken dog’s tooth, and a bloodstained claw and skin.

  Mullen and Brown will be sentenced by Mansfield magistrates next month along with Ryan Nuttall, 21, of Newstead, Notts who earlier admitted eight counts of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and one each for attending and organising a dog fight. Another two men – Nigel Greensmith, 32, of Newstead, and Andrew Taylor, 29, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, Derbys, were fined a total of £550 and ordered to pay £300 costs after admitting watching a fight last April.

  As a result of these convictions, many Irish dogs will be spared the utter humiliation and devastating pain of such evil contests.

  They are the latest in a long line of victories for justice won by Irish News of the World investigators. We have a long tradition of exposing villains. We have helped bring about more than 100 prosecutions of child molesters arms dealers, c6redit card fraudsters and drug dealers.

  We will continue to hound you out. The Irish News of the World NEVER gives up.



11 to be tried for animal cruelty

Irish Times, 20/04/2005

The trial of 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare will begin at Naas Circuit Court in July.  The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare. The men have all been charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act, 1911.

  Yesterday Judge Patrick McCartan said the case was of priority and it should be the first heard in the next court session which begins on July 5th.

  “it’s the type of case, if left lingering in the list, it will never get out of the traps,” he said.

He immediately said he had not intended the use of such wards as a rumble of suppressed laughter spread around the court.  The Judge was informed the case would take approximately a week and would require a jury.

  Seven counsel are representing the men, some of whom requested further disclosure of specific documents.

  Judge McCartan was informed there would be 17 witnesses involved in the trial.  He suggested that all parties return to court in mid-June to ensure that all issues of disclosure had been revolved before the trial proceeded.

  The defendants are on bail on their own bond of €500 and are expected to plead not guilty to the charges.

  The accused are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.



Garda saw men flee dog fight

Evening Herald, 08/07/2005

A garda described how he came across a dog fight in progress when he raided a Kildare farm.  When gardai burst in, several men fled the scene.  Gardai and members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) had taken part in the raid on the buildings on private lands, Sgt Con O’Sullivan said.  When the door of the building at Brockagh in Robertstown was opened on the morning of October 31, 2003 three or four men had ran away towards open fields, he explained.

  The raid had come about after information that the dog figh1t was going on.  Three or four vehicles were parked outside the farm buildings, Sgt O’Sullivan told Naas Circuit Court.  The raid happened at 11am on a bank holiday Friday where gardai found two distressed dogs in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial, which is estimated to take another four days, will hear evidence from a number of gardai from Newbridge and Robertstown stations as well as members of the ISPCA.

  The nine accused men are: Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castle town, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Mapelwood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimmnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham.

  One of the charges, under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, is that the men cruelly ill-treated two animals while the other stated they assisted in the fighting of animals.

  After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two other accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.



Two men found not guilty in illegal dog fighting case

Irish Independent, 08/07/2005

Two men charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight in Co Kildare have been found not guilty because of an absence of evidence.  John Moody of Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue, and Anthony Burke of Corstwon, Oldcastle, Co Meath, were releas,07ed on the direction of Judge Patrick McCartan at Naas circuit court yesterday.  The two were on trial along with nine others. The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.  All of the men pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting.

  After lengthy legal argument yesterday, Judge McCartan told the jury that two of the accused had been released due to an absence of connecting evidence.

  Earlier Sgt Con O’Sullivan of Newbridge Garda Station said that when he entered a farm building at Brockagh he found two dogs fighting each other in a specially constructed ring.  When the door of the building was opened, three or four men ran away.

  During the raid, by members of the gardai and the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, two distressed dogs were found in a pen with cuts and lacerations.

  The trial of the other nine men is estimated to take another four days and will continue on Tuesday.



Rescued: Savaged animals found in a pen during raid on farmhouse

Evening Herald, 07/07/2005

Cash found in raid on ‘dog fight’

Two dogs who were pitted against each other to the death were saved by gardai after officers swooped on a farmhouse in the middle of an illegal dog fight, it is alleged.  The savaged animals were found in a pen in the farm house at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, a court heard.  The raid, which also involved members of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA), came on foot of confidential information received by the gardai.

  Eleven men were charged in connection with running an illegal dog fight at Naas Circuit Court.

  The alleged offences are said to have happened on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare. All pleaded not guilty to two charges in relation to dog fighting in the court.

  Counsel for the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) said some of the men on the farm were found with money on them when officers arrived at the scene.  He also said a number of other men may got away after they ran when the raid started.

  The 11 accused men are: Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath; Richard Bernard Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham, all in Dublin.




Charges against two dropped in illegal dogfight case in Kildare

Irish Times, 08/07/2005

The case against two of the 11 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight in Co Kildare was dropped yesterday.

  Judge Patrick McCartan told the jury he would be directing a not-guilty verdict in relation to Anthony Burke, Corstown, Oldcastle, Co Meath, and John Moody, Coolamber Crescent, Templeogue. He sad there was not enough evidence to connect them to the alleged dog fight.

  Most of the day was taken up with legal argument in the absence of the jury.

  The remaining defendants face charges on two counts of animal cruelty. They are Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow; Troy Jordan, River Road, Allenwood, Co Kildare; James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght; David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght; Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom road, Drimnagh and Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham. The alleged offences are said to have occurred on October 31st 2003, in a shed at Brockagh, Robertstwon, Co Kildare.

  The court was earlier told that when gardai arrived at the shed that morning shortly after 11am, several men ran from the building and were followed by the officers. On entering the shed, the gardai noticed that there were two dogs in a galvanised ring fighting each other. There were also several men in the shed.

  The case has been adjourned until July 12th.



Dogs in bloody fight to death

Savage: Ladder used to separate terriers after raid on remote farmhouse

Evening Herald, 14/07/2005

Gardai had to use the leg of a ladder to force apart two blood-soaked pit bull terriers who were pitted against each other to the death in a savage illegal dog fight, a court heard.  And they spent five minutes trying to break the grip the dog had on its rival after they raided a remote farmhouse at Brockagh, near Allenwood, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003.

  Five men were found guilty of cruelty ill-treating two animals during a dog fight in the first case of its kind in the state.


Offence

A jury in Naas circuit court found the five men guilty and another man not guilty.

  Troy Jordan, Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare; Richard Somerville, Dunard Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght, were all found guilty of the offence on October 31, 2003 at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.

  Richard Bernard, Dark Road, Castletown, Carlow, was found not guilty by the all make jury.

  Judge Patrick McCartan earlier directed the three men of the original group of nine accused – Michael Quinn, Slieve Bloom Road, Drimnagh; Joseph Blake, Loreto Avenue, Rathfarnham and James Ferris, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, be released as he was not satisfied there was sufficient evidence to continue.

  The remaining men were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911 with cruelly ill-treating two animals after an additional charge of assisting in the fighting of the animals was taken from the indictment by Judge McCartan. All had pleaded not guilty.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) inspectors had raided the Kildare farm and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a steel pen.The two pit bull terriers had lacerations to the face, ear, head, neck and forelimbs, the court had heard. A number of men were found by the pen while others ran out to nearby fields, some of whom were subsequently caught.

  Shocked officers found the dogs fighting in a steel den splattered with blood. “One of the dogs was holding the other day by the neck,” Garda Steve Kenneavy said.

  “It was a strong grip. I jumped into the ring and tried to get the dogs apart. I managed to get the leg of a ladder between them to release his jaw.”

Each of the men faces a maximum fine of €12,270 and/or two years’ imprisonment. The five convicted men remain on continuing bail until July 28 for sentencing.



Man faces dog fight charge

Irish Independent, 18/02/2005

A Dublin man charged in connection with an illegal dog fight at Robertstown, Co Kildare has been sent forward for trial to Naas Circuit Criminal Court on April 19.

Karl Breen, of Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin was remanded in custody with consent to bail on his own bond of €300 and an independent surety of €600.



Dogfight case is adjourned

Irish Times, 18/11/2004

The case against 12 men charged in connection with running an illegal dogfight was adjourned until December 16th at Naas District Court yesterday.  The defence requested the adjournment because it said it needed more time to consider the matter.  The alleged offec6es are said to have occurred on October 31st, 2003, at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare.



Fighting dog found in GAA star’s home

Evening Herald, 21/04/2006

Police and animal welfare officials are investigating a top GAA star after a pitbull fighting dog was discovered during a raid on his house.

Tyrone’s Ger Cavlan was caught in possession of the illegal terrier, dog fighting magazines, a detailed book of local fights, diet sheets and a treadmill.

The dog found has been linked to the infamous underground practice of dog fights by animal welfare charity the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA).

After the raid they said they were also extremely worried about the welfare of three more dogs they believe had been in the house.

While the footballer has denied the ownership of the items he could now be prosecuted for having them in his possession.

He could face not only a prison sentence – it is illegal to own pitbulls in Northern Ireland – but a hefty fine and a ban on keeling animals.

In a statement from his solicitor, Mr Cavlan said that while he does keep dogs he did not own the one discovered during the raid at his Dungannon home last Wednesday night.

The USPCA said that after inspection, a vet had found the male dog’s injuries to be consistent with the kind of wounds that would be inflicted during a dog fight.



History made as dog fight swoop lands handle in jail for 18 months

Evening Herald, 28/07/2005

A brutal dog owner made history today when he was jailed for cruelty to animals during a dog fight.  Troy Jordan, of Blackthorn Cottage, River Road, Allenwood South, Co Kildare, now faces 18 months behind bars.  He was handed down the sentence in Naas Circuit Court in the first case of its kind in thbe8 history of the State.

  Jordan, along with four others, had been found guilty of ill-treating two animals during a dog fight at the conclusion of a trial two weeks ago.

  The other four were: Richard Somerville, Dunary Drive, Navan Road, Cabra; Karl Breen, Nangor Crescent, Clondalkin; Thomas Codd, Cloonmore Crescent, Tallaght and David Deegan, Maplewood Park, Springfield, Tallaght.

  Breen received a nine-month suspended sentence on condition he pays €5,000 to the ISPCA; Deegan has to pay €3,000 and received an 18-month suspended sentence; Somerville received the same; while Codd received a nine-month sentence, suspended for two years, on condition he pays €500.

  The five were charged under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1911, with cruelly ill-treating two animals. All had pleaded not guilty at the opening of the trial.

  The trial had previously heard that a team of gardai and ISPCA inspectors had raided a farm at Brockagh, Robertstown, Co Kildare, on October 31, 2003, and found two dogs in a bloody embrace in a corrugated steel pen.

  Jordan had a previous conviction for cruelty to six pit bull terriers which had been found in neglect at his home.



Man who watched Co. Kildare cock-fight fined £300.

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched cock-fight in a Co. Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs. The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, whic6h was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured. Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co. Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse. Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10:45am on July 6th, 1997.



Growth in dog fighting rings sparks appeal for crackdown.

Irish Independent, 05/05/2009

Tamer dogs such as greyhounds are often used as "bait" during the training phase of a fighting-dog's career, giving the animal a taste for blood and some practice in fighting. Two abandoned, severely-injured greyhounds, found in the last week in the Clonmel area are thought to have been used as training material for fighting dogs. Gardai and the Tipperary SPCA are currently investigating the discoveries. "One dog was quite literally torn open," said Mark Hickey of the TSPCA. "It was still alive when we found it but had to be put down by the vet because the injury was so bad. It [the tear] started below the rib cage, and continued down into the dog's side and into the groin." Another greyhound/whippet, aged about five, found around the same time had up to 80 puncture wounds -- consistent with being repeatedly attacked by a fighting dog. "He was also brought to the vet but died of shock," said Hickey. The first dog, thought to have been between two and three years old, was originally a racing greyhound as it had an official tattoo, and the SPCA have asked Bord na gCon for help in tracing its owners.



Father and sons plead guilty to dog fighting charges

NewsLetter, 14/01/2014

A father and two sons from east Belfast have pleaded guilty to charges linked to animal cruelty and animal fighting.

  Jeremiah Kirkwood (43) and his sons Christopher (23) and Wayne (20), who are all from Island Street, appeared in the dock of Belfast Crown Court on Tuesday.

  All three originally faced a total of 15 charges, but after pleading guilty to three charges each, the remaining counts were left on the books.

  Each of the three men admitted to causing unnecessary suffering to four terrier cross puppies on dates between November 1 and November 28, 2011.

  They also pleaded guilty to possession of items for use in connection with an animal fight, namely a CD7 battery pack, handheld lamps, a green dog harness and an animal trap. The father and two sons also admitted a charge of keeping or training animals for an animal fight on dates between July 10 and November 28, 2011.

  The final charge relates to four bull lurcher dogs.

  A co-accused, 19-year old Jamie Edward Morrow from McAllister Court in Belfast, originally faced three charges. Two of these were left on the books after he admitted a charge of keeping or training an animal for a fight, namely a whippet cross Staffordshire bull terrier, on November 27.

  After the guilty pleas were entered, Judge Donna McColgan ordered that pre-sentence reports be prepared for all four men. The Judge agreed to release them on continued bail but said: “this is no indication of the likely outcome of the case”, which will be heard before the same court on February 21.

  Also appearing in the dock of the same court was Catherine Kirkwood from Island Street in Belfast.

  Wife of Jeremiah and mother of Wayne and Christopher, the 43-year old originally faced a total of 15 charges linked to animal cruelty and animal fighting.

  A jury was sworn in to hear the case, but a prosecutor told the Judge and jury that the Crown would be offering no evidence against her.

  Judge McColgan directed the jury to find Catherine Kirkwood not guilty of all the charges against her and when they were discharged, Kirkwood was told she was free to go.



Cock-fighting investigation: Birds seized in County Fermanagh

BBC, 10/12/2013

A number of birds have been seized in County Fermanagh as part of an investigation into illegal cockfighting.

  The police operation into alleged animal cruelty took place at three locations.

  There were no arrests and police said enquiries are continuing.

  At one of the properties, roosters had been tied by the leg to blue plastic barrels.

  A vet said the birds were healthy and uninjured, although the combs on their heads had been removed.

  Removing the combs, or dubbing, is believed to be common practice in birds bred for fighting.


Cruelty

Earlier this year the BBC reported on a two-year USPCA investigation into illegal cock-fights, which take place regularly at venues on both sides of the Irish border.

  At one site, about 60 people, some of them children, were gathered around a makeshift ring in County Monaghan about five miles from the border with Middletown in County Armagh.

  On another occasion, both birds seemed to survive. In an earlier encounter one of the birds was lifted, apparently lifeless, from the ring.

  These big events in the cock-fighting world are known as derbies.

  Police said they are working in partnership with other agencies to investigate suspected fighting offences leading to possible animal cruelty.

  Anyone with concerns or information in relation to animal cruelty for farmed animals has been asked to contact the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

  Offences for non-farmed animals for example, domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys should be reported to the animal welfare officer in local councils.

  Any suspected organised fighting offences should be reported to the police.



Dog used as fighting bait left savaged

Drogheda Independent, 05/01/2011

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn was believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of the worst cases the organisation had seen this year.

  They reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck. The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals. Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher had been named Lucky as he was lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

  DAR were also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there were many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.



Lurcher left with horrific injuries
ANIMAL USED AS BAIT FOR DOG FIGHTING

Drogheda Independent, 02/06/2010

A LURCHER with horrific injuries rescued near the Monasterboice Inn is believed to have been used as bait for dog fighting.

  A spokesperson for Drogheda Animal Rescue (DAR), who rescued the animal last week, following a call from a concerned member of the public, said this was one of hte worst cases the organisation has seen this year.

  They have reported the incident as an act of animal cruelty to the local branch of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA).

  When a DAR volunteer attended the scene last Wednesday, they found the large male Lurcher on the ground with a rope around his neck.

  The dog had horrific wounds on his legs and body, was suffering from shock and was barely moving.

  He was immediately taken to the local vet where he was treated for severe dehydration and a high temperature.

  His open wounds were badly infected and one of his front legs had sustained several fractures.

  'It is believed that this Lurcher was used as bait for dog fighting as his injuries are those of bite wounds and his leg fractures are not typical of a road traffic accident,' said the DAR spokesperson.

Lurchers are not fighting dogs and are very placid and docile animals.

  Despite his horrific injuries, he is a gentle and trusting soul.

  She described the Lurcher as a 'gentle giant' and said it was heartbreaking to see the condition in which he had been left.

  The Lurcher has been named Lucky as he is lucky to be alive, the spokesperson added.

  Drogheda Animal Rescue is urgently seeking donations to help pay for Lucky's veterinarian care and his long road to recovery.

  DAR are also advising dog owners to keep their dogs secure in their gardens and homes as there are have been many reports around the country where dogs are stolen solely for the purpose for use in dog fighting and most do not survive.

  For further information or to make a donation contact Drogheda Animal Rescue on 9832418 or visit their website at www.dar.ie.



Men plead guilty to training dogs for animal fightsThe PSNI said that the men were aged 43 and 19 years of age.

The Journal.ie, 14/01/2014

A TWO-YEAR investigation into dog fighting saw two men pleading guilty today to keeping animals for use in animal fighting.

  The PSNI welcomed the guilty plea by 43-year-old, Jerimiah Kirkwood, Chris Kirkwood (23) and Wayne Kirkwood (20) from East Belfast, in relation to keeping or training animals for use in connection with animal fights; ownership of items in connection with an animal fight; and also causing unnecessary suffering to four terrier cross pups in Belfast Crown Court.

  Jamie Morrow (19), also from East Belfast, pleaded guilty at Belfast Crown Court to keeping or training animals for use in connection with an animal fight.

  Detective Inspector Peter Mullan said of the guilty pleas: The corresponding police investigation has taken over two years and a significant amount of time and energy has been invested in bringing these individuals before the court.

  He thanked the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (USPCA), the Scottish SPCA, the Dublin Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and members of the local community for their support during the investigation.

  He added that police will continue to follow up all reports of animal cruelty linked to fighting offences. When the PSNI is made aware of a possible breach in the Wildlife (NI) Order 1985 or Welfare of Animals Act (NI) 2011 for fighting offences, an investigating officer is assigned to carry out inquiries.

  Anyone with information on offences regarding non-farmed animals – including domestic pets such as cats, dogs, horses and donkeys – should contact the animal welfare officer in local councils. Anyone in Northern Ireland who has a suspicion regarding organised fighting offences is asked to contact their nearest police station on 0845 600 8000.