Cases in 2007

Dog’s leg amputated DIY style – ‘horrific cruelty’
Tipperary Star, 3/5/2007

A springer spaniel dog that was found wandering in a garden in Cashel last weekend with one of its front legs amputated "DIY style" is to be operated on today (Thursday) in an attempt to relieve its suffering.  see more



Carlow farmer disturbs livestock killers

Carlow First, 9/8/2007

 (John Cleary)

A Carlow farmer has been left short on his livestock count after he discovered an appalling case of cruelty to animals on his Castledermot farm last Sunday night. The farmer, Padraig Murphy, was awoken in the middle of the night when heard his sheep bleating in a nearby field.  And when he went out to investigate he discovered the body of one of his pedigree sheep slaughtered in the field and spotted three people running from the area. The livestock owner came across three suspects in the field but they turned and scampered when they saw the farmer approaching with his torch.  The dead sheep, a pedigree Suffolk bred ewe lamb said to be worth €500, was killed with a screwdriver using several blows to piece the creature's neck but it was dead.  The perpetrators had begun to skin the dead animal, although they were skinning her the wrong way, starting from the rear and working towards the head instead of the other way around.

 Carlow Gardai are investigating the incident as a matter of cruelty to animals and asking anyone with information to contact them in confidence on (059) 9131505.



Worst case of animal cruelty seen in Ireland

Irish Sun, 9/10/2007

(Fergus O' Shea)

A father and son have pleaded guilty to the worst case of animal cruelty ever seen in Ireland. A cop found starving horses with no grass or fodder next to the carcasses of four dead animals at a site rented by Simon O' Dwyer and his son, also called Simon.  Three horses had to be put down while the remaining 25 were taken into care by the Irish Horse Welfare Trust, a judge at Carrick-on-Suir District Court , Co. Tipperary heard.  Just a month later, 51 cattle and one live horse were found in shocking conditions along with the carcasses of four cattle and one horse at the O' Dwyer' Mullinbeg farm.  An investigation by Garda Sgt Stephen O' Sullivan resulted in the seizure of the cattle. Judge Terence Flynn called the animal cruelty the worst he had ever seen in his time working on the bench.  O' Dwyer Snr, 61 and 21-year-old O' Dwyer, Jnr of Knocktoper, Co. Kilkenny were given four-months suspended jail sentences. They were also fined €3,000 each and ordered to pay €38,000 to the Irish Horse Welfare Trust as a contribution to nursing their animals plus €2,000 for carcass disposal and €540 vet fees. 

A Trust spokesman said: "We are looking for kind and experienced homes for the horses."



Dog’s neck slashed in appalling act of cruelty

Attack: DSPCA seek owner

Evening Herald, 29/5/2007

This little black terrier was fortunate to be alive today after its neck was slashed in an appalling act of cruelty.   see more



Decision on Walderstown foxhunt cruelty investigation expected today
West Meath Independent, 1/12/2007

This afternoon (Wednesday), the body in charge of foxhunting in Ireland is expected to announce the findings of its investigation into claims that a fox was dug out of its den, tied up and fed alive to the hounds during a recent hunt in Walderstown.  An Irish Masters' of Foxhounds Association (IMFHA) sub-committee, which was set up to investigate the claims, was due to meet with members of the Westmeath Hunt yesterday evening, with a decision set to be announced today.

  The Westmeath Hunt organised the November 14 meet during which the incident is said to have taken place, but the organisation has strongly denied the claims. Caroline Preston of the Westmeath Hunt committee told this paper that while she did not take part in the meet in question, the Hunt has "vehemently denied" that the incident took place. "We are anxious to clear our name," said Ms Preston. 

  The Irish Council Against Blood Sports called for a Garda investigation into the claims, which were reported in the national press last week. Sergeant Noel Mulligan of Athlone Garda station said that, as of yesterday, the local gardai had received no report in relation to the incident.

  Landowner in Walderstown, Michael Murray, is reported to have been an eye witness to the hunt, but when contacted by this paper yesterday he said he had no comment to make in relation to the alleged events. The Walderstown allegations were originally discussed by the IMFHA at a meeting early last week.  The association's spokesperson, Brian Munn, said that a sub-committee was then established to investigate the claims and that in the last few days this group has spoken to a number of people "both formally and informally" as part of its enquiry.  "From our point of view we need to find out if something happened and, if it did, we need to make sure that it doesn't happen again," he commented.

  The Westmeath Hunt was suspended while the investigation was taking place.

  The alleged incident is outlawed under the code of conduct drawn up by the Irish Hunting Association and sanctioned by the Department of Agriculture and Food. It states that: "In no circumstances will a live fox which has been dug out be thrown to the hounds.


Farmer may go to jail over ‘large-scale’ animal cruelty

Irish Independent, 25/07/2007

A farmer faces the threat of prison after being convicted of what one animal welfare official described as the worst large-scale case of cruelty she ever encountered.

Kenneth Coombes appeared at Skibbereen District Court yesterday for a litany of cruelty offences on his west Cork farm.

  An unburied carcass was discovered on the front lawn of Coombes’ home outside Skibbereen; the entire property was infested by rats and rubbish was lying strewn throughout the farmyard; two dogs were found living in barrel; 19 ducks had lost most of their feathers and were fighting with rats for feed; horses were in an alarming condition while sheep and pigs were wandering local roadways.

  The court was told the rat infestation problem was so serious that the Health Service Executive’s environmental health section had to be consulted to prevent a potential public safety risk.


Scars

Yesterday, the Department of Agriculture was directed by the court to deal with the 12 pigs and 86 sheep that remain on the property while Coombes is remanded in custody for three days.

  Animal Care Society official Della Murray told the court that several dogs had scars on their neck from effectively being chained to the ground.  One dogs was so traumatised after being kept throughout its life in a cage that it now could not tolerate being in the open.  Another dog had a broken leg which, after being left untreated, had set in an incorrect position.

  “It was absolutely appalling. It is the worst case of cruelty on a large scale that I have ever seen,” she said.

Coombes, of the Carrig, Luttiga, Skibbereen, had pleaded guilty to six offences before Judge James McNulty last November. They included allowing a livestock carcass to remain unburied on the front lawn of a dwelling house on June 2 2006 allowing sheep and pigs to wander untended on the roads and ill-treating pigs through keeping them in a car trailer where there was insufficient room for them to lie down.

  The court had allowed him nine months to reduce live stock numbers on his farm and address the serious health and environment issues on the property.

  Defence solicitor Ray Hennessy said yesterday that substantial progress had been made over recent weeks with horses, sheep and pigs being disposed of. He said that his client was from a dysfunctional background and was socially isolated.

  However, Judge McNulty said Coombes had been allowed ample time to resolve the problems on his farm. He said the facts in the case were “grim” – and warned that a custodial sentence may now be warranted.

  The court heard Coombes had several previous convictions for cruelty to animals dating back 15 years. He also has a conviction for sex4ual assault.  Coombes was remanded in custody to appear for sentencing before Bantry District Court on Friday.



Stud farmer jailed for animal cruelty

Irish Times, 06/2007

A stud farmer has been sent to prison for animal cruelty after an ISPCA inspector found a horse in his care to have injuries, including pus oozing from his head and a foul smell coming from a wound 15cm long and 3cm deep across his nose.

  Eamon Salmon of Fort barrington Athy, Co Kildare, was convicted and sentenced to three months imprisonment over the incident on September 1st, 2006, when ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes, accompanied by gardai, inspected a premise at Ballylehane Lower, Ballylinan, and found a yearling in what he described as “considerable distress.”

  Mr Hughes told the court that the wound had been caused by a head collar and it was suggested in court that the collar appeared to be too tight and that there was flesh growing over the collar.

  “I was concerned for the welfare of the horse. He would not allow me to put a hand on him. It would obviously have been extremely sore to touch. He was tossing his head up and down. There was a lot pus and ooze coming through the head collar and a foul smell coming from the wound. There was not a doubt in my mind that the horse needed attention.”

Judge Eamonn O’Brien was told that it took the ISPCA inspector and gardai a number of hours to take the animal into their care, owing to the level of terror experienced by the horse.

  The horse was traced back to the ownership of Salmon as it was found on his land with other animals belonging to him.  Salmon was later visited by two ISPCA inspectors and evidence was given in court that during the meeting, he admitted ownership of the horse.  He was asked to surrender the animal to the ISPCA and signed an acceptance from doing so.

  After this was done, Mr Hughes said that the defendant “became extremely annoyed” and said: “’I know that’s all you wanted to do all along – get me into court. You can’t prove the yearling belongs to me. He has no chip’.” (He was referring to the micro-chips which allow animal ownership to be traced).

The defendant told the court that the horse was not his and that he had “sold it on”.

  When the judge asked who the owner was and whether that person could be brought to court, he replied: “No, he is six months dead.”

  Garda Inspector Jerry Coonan put it to Salmon that this was his horse but that it was a horse “of limited ability or a reject” and that it was being kept on these lands, away from his stud farm, so that people coming to the farm could not see it.

The judge described photographs of the horse submitted to the court as “appalling”.



Sicko Stubs Out Ciggies On Dog

News of the World, 29/07/2007

These are the horrific pictures taken after a dog was found covered in CIGARETTE burns inflicted by an evil sadist.  The covering, 14-month-old greyhound – given the name Aaron by the owners of animal welfare group PAWS – was found last week with 27 burns all over its face and body.  It was taken to the rescue kennel in Mullinnahone, Co Tipperary, after being spotted wandering nearyby.  And shelter owners Gina and Tom Molloy said the sickening cruelty has left the poor pup scarred for life.


Cruelty

Tom, 43, said: “The person responsible still hasn’t been caught – what kind of person would inflict such cruelty on an animal? We’ll keep him with us for a few months until he’s well enough to be placed with a responsible owner who will give him the love he needs.”

  Sadly, the horrific cruelty inflicted on Aaron is just one of hundreds of cases seen by the kennel each year.

  Tome said: “Unfortunately, this kind of abuse is not unusual. We are seeing an increasing number of cases each week. We’re full to bursting point at the moment – we’re even having to keep dogs in our own house. We get €25,000 a year Government funding, but rely on the generosity of the public to meet the €400,000 running costs.”

Donations to PAS can be made to AIP in NAAS, Co Kildare. Account 07680026, sort code 933236.



Capital hit by lamb rustling ‘epidemic’

Evening Herald, 12/04/2007

It’s like a throwback to medieval times, but believe it or not, the theft of lambs from fields in C^Ounty Dublin is reaching crisis levels.

  Spring lambs are now being robbed from pastures in a spate of thefts, before being fattened up and slaughtered for dinner.

  The DSPCA has today reported a number of recent cases in which three-week-old lambs have been swiped from the countryside and reared in the city.  The farm animals are taken to housing estates where they are left to graze in bac6k gardedns before being killed.

  The revelation comes after it also emerged swans were taken from Dublin’s canals and eaten.

  Thousands of lambs have been born in recent weeks during the annual lambing season and thieves are helping themselves to a free meal in a relatively new crime to hit Ireland.

  In Lucan, two lambs were rescued from a back garden when a concerned neighbour alerted the authorities.

  The fence between two houses was taken down periodically to allow the lambs more grass to nibble on and DSPCA inspectors had to call Gardai to assist in retrieving the creatures after the occupants of the house denied they were there.

  They were eventually discovered hidden in a hut in a case that mirrored another one last year where a sheep was found concealed in a house in Tallaght.  In this instance non-national children were sitting on the animal, which was hidden under blankets. The animal had to be put down as its back was broken.

  On Tuesday morning, one stunned private homeowner near Harold’s Cross opened her door to find a lamb curled up on her porch and it’s believed the creature may have been abandoned by some rustlers as it was too young.

  The DSPCA said that the past month has seen increasing cases of lamb robberies and claimed that non-nationals from Eastern Europe were involved.

  “We have been inundated with lambs who have been nicked,” said Jimmy Cahill of the DSPCA shelter in Rathfarnham.

And four lambs are now being hand-reared with bottles by a volunteer with the animal group.

  Mr Cahill added that the issue posed a huge problem for its struggling rescue organisation because it can’t return the lambs to farmers and it has to care for them instead. He also told how swans have been taken from canals around Dublin.

And Mr Cahill also claimed that some immigrants are throwing drift nets in the canals to catch fish.



Pheasant shooter handed €130 fine

Bray People, 19/01/2007

A man who shot a pheasant in his front garden, was fined €130 for killing a protected wild bird out of season by Judge Donnchadh O Buachalla at Wexford District Court.

  Colm Davis of Courtclough Upper, Blackwater admitted the offence which happened at his home on May 3 last year.

  A garda witness told the court that the defendant was upstairs at home when he saw a pheasant in his front garden.  He had a firearm and took out the gun and shot the bird.  He was unaware of the fact that it was outside of the shooting season and the pheasant was a protected wild bird.

  The defendant told the court that he apologised sincerely and said he didn’t know he was doing wrong.

The garda told the court that the defendant had two firearms licences and both of them were revoked following the incident.



Worst case of animal cruelty seen in Ireland

Irish Sun, 09/10/2007

A father and son have pleaded guilty to the worst case of animal cruelty ever seen in Ireland. A cop found starving horses with no grass or fodder next to the carcasses of four dead animals at a site rented by Simon O' Dwyer and his son, also called Simon.  

  Three horses had to be put down while the remaining 25 were taken into care by the Irish Horse Welfare Trust, a judge at Carrick-on-Suir District Court , Co. Tipperary heard.  

  Just a month later, 51 cattle and one live horse were found in shocking conditions along with the carcasses of four cattle and one horse at the O' Dwyer' Mullinbeg farm.  

 An investigation by Garda Sgt Stephen O' Sullivan resulted in the seizure of the cattle. Judge Terence Flynn called the animal cruelty the worse he had ever seen in his time working on the bench.  

  O' Dwyer Snr, 61 and 21-year-old O' Dwyer, Jnr of Knocktoper, Co. Kilkenny were given four-months suspended jail sentences. They were also fined €3,000 each and ordered to pay €38,000 to the Irish Horse Welfare Trust as a contribution to nursing their animals plus €2,000 for carcass disposal and €540 vet fees.  

  A Trust spokesman said: "We are looking for kind and experienced homes for the horses."



Man fined for horse cruelty

Irish Daily Star, 17/10/2007

A farmer who neglected an old horse on his land was convicted yesterday. Donal Seeley (34) of Ballymurray Co. Roscommon pleaded guilty at Roscommon District Court to animal cruelty.

    The court heard ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes found the animal in excruciating pain on land at Ballyleague, Lanesborough, in November 2006 and it was so sick it had to be put down.

 Solicitor Kevin Kilrain said Seeley was simply busy and did not visit the land in question that often. He said the horse was old and worn and was worth nothing.  

  Judge Jeffrey Brown said that was no excuse. The judge imposed a find of €1,000 and ordered Seely to pay costs of €690. After the case ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes said it was one of the worst cases he'd ever seen.



Greyhounds tested positive at Brandywell, says ICC.

Derry Journal, 12/10/2007

Eight Northern Irish greyhound owners have been fined in the past year after their dogs tested positive for banned substances - including cocaine. Other substances found included amphetamine, also known as speed.



Racing dog had 'ecstasy in system'.

Irish Independent, 28/10/2007

It is understood to be the first time that an animal was found with benzylpiperazine (BZP) anywhere since the substance was added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances last year. It also comes just months after a new independent committee was set up to investigate doping in greyhound racing. BZP is legally sold in Ireland as an ecstasy substitute in dance clubs and various outlets, and is also available in health stores here as a slimming pill. In April of this year, a dog running at Lifford in Donegal was tested and BZP was found, and the new independent body overseeing the policing of greyhound racing has since fined the owner €250.

2007 "Tigresa" aka "Biddy the Lark" aka "Barcelona Super Girl". She started life as "Biddy the Lark" racing in Ireland then at some point she was exported to Spain ... presumably because she was no longer fast enough to race in Ireland. In Spain she ran at the Meridiana track near Barcelona (now closed) a total of 213 times and between 19th March and 26th December 2004 she ran a race every 2 or 3 days ... basically she was run into the ground. When the track closed her "owner" didn't want her anymore and she was lucky to be rescued by the Scooby refuge.



Mutilated greyhound heralds tighter controls.

Sunday Times, 17/06/2007

Regulations dealing with the registration and sale of greyhounds have been introduced after the discovery of a mutilated animal in Waterford. Officers fro the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) rescued the greyhound, which they named Aoife, after a day-long chase around Tramore in April last year. The dog's ears had been cut off to prevent its owners being tracked using its unique ear tattoo. The owner, traced by the DNA sample, said he sold Aoife to another trainer. This second man has told the greyhound board and the gardai that he sold the dog to an unidentifiable traveller he met "on the road".