Cat was convulsed in agony on footpath
The Nationalist, 1/2/2006
The horrific scene of a cat convulsed in agony on a Graiguecullen footpath suffering a malicious death horrified passers-by this week.

The horrific scene of a cat convulsed in agony on a Graiguecullen footpath suffering a malicious death horrified passers-by this week. The distressing scene occurred last Wednesday morning as residents made their way to local schools and places of work near the Croppy Grave, Graiguecullen. A black cat was observed lying on the footpath convulsing, its leg twisted underneath its body. Initially, those who stopped to aid the helpless animal thought it had been struck by a car. However, a veterinary examination revealed a far more sinister cause of death and confirmed that the cat was poisoned. Despite the best efforts of all involved, the animal was put down. “The vet said he thought the cat had been poisoned, which could have explained the cat’s convulsive state and perhaps the reason for its being caught up in the middle of the road and subsequently run over. “He also stated that the owner was contacted and that another pet owner had brought their cat in with the same symptoms,” explained a woman who witnessed the distressing scene. “It’s hard to believe that people could be poisoning cats,” she added. Since then, the authorities have become aware of at least two other cats that have fallen victim to poison in the Graiguecullen area. ISPCA Inspector Jean Bird was aware of the incident and added her belief that the substance administered to the cats is once again alphachloralose or ‘sleepy crow’, which, just two weeks ago, caused birds to literally drop from the sky in the town’s main streets. “Someone has certainly laid alphachloralose in the area. It is unlikely that it is from the same batch that affected the birds from two weeks ago so clearly, someone has laid it fresh... probably in powder form if cats are eating it,” Ms Bird stated. “Certainly I know of another cat in Graiguecullen who was in a garden and appeared to be affected but we were unable to catch it. “I do know there has been a problem with a large number of cats in the area... so it appears that someone has cruelly taken it on themselves to do something,” Ms Bird added. Alphachloralose is a rodenticide and bird poison, which has both stimulatory and depressive effects on the central nervous system. In cats it causes abnormal behaviour, aggression, changing habits, inability to stand, seizures or coma.