Cases in 2002

Irish Independent, 5/1/2002

David Reid, Caledon Co. Armagh was fined €1,000 at Monaghan District Court for failing to bury the carcasses of two dead sheep on lands in the Republic of Ireland. He pleaded guilty to the charges.


Man left dog to starve in garden

Irish Star, 26/4/2002

(Main parts of the article)

David Hendrick (40) of 9 Cherry Orchard Parade, Ballyfermot Dublin 10 was banned from keeping a pet for life after an emaciated dog was found almost starved to death at his home. He was also fined €150 after he pleaded guilty to charges of neglect in Dublin District Court (25/04/02). DSPCA Inspector Robert Kenny told the court he found the starving dog at Hendrick’s home on the 4th March 2002. The dog, two-year-old Rattweiller crossbred was in an “advanced stage of neglect” in the back garden of the defendant’s home. The dog has since recovered from his ordeal.


Farmer fined 11,427 Euro for using banned cattle drugs.

Irish Times, 16/10/2002
Abscesses on the carcasses of animals being processed in a meat export plant alerted the Department of Agriculture and Food to the use of banned hormone growth-promoters by a Meath farmer, Dunshaughlin Court heard yesterday.  see more

You sick animal

Sunday World, 2/12/2002
Brian McCann is the deviant publican behind a stomach-churning ‘squish’ video showing a woman callously stamping a helpless kitten to death with a stiletto heel.  see more


Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer's last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002.
A Judge issued his final warning to an elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O'Sullivan, 78, from Doonass, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O'Donnell told O'Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her farm wasn't depopulated within a fortnight. O'Sullivan's solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not willing to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. Judge O'Donnell released O'Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.


Garda smelled cruelty from road.

Irish Examiner, 19/12/2002
A rural garda literally smelled animal cruelty as he passed a farm in North Cork and on investigation he found 47 dead cattle and many more malnourished cows standing among the carcases.  see more


Jury retires without reaching verdict on vets accused of NI livestock scam

Irish Examiner, 14/2/2002

A jury debating the fate of two vets accused of helping to swindle the Ministry of Defence out of millions of pounds in a massive dead livestock scam, last night, retired without reaching a verdict.  see more


Farm probe garda tells of ordeal with animals

Irish Examiner, 4/1/2002
A garda investigating the suspected neglect of cattle on a farm in Cork had to arm himself with a pike as the animals approached him in the yard, a court was told yesterday.  see more


Gin trap smashes cat’s leg in pieces

The Nationalist, 16/12/2002

A cat lying in enormous distress, her front leg severed by a vicious and illegal gin trap was discovered in Killeshin, close to the local national school on Monday morning having dragged itself to a nearby house, its front leg still caught in the jaws of the illegal trap. The young female cat is currently recovering from her ordeal in Carlow Veterinary Clinic and is expected to recover despite the loss of her leg.



Farmer fined 11,427 Euro for using banned cattle drugs

Irish Times, 16/10/2002

Abscesses on the carcasses of animals being processed in a meat export plant alerted the Department of Agriculture and Food to the use of banned hormone growth-promoters by a Meath farmer, Dunshaughlin Court heard yesterday. The farmer, James McDernitt (54), Blackhills, Kilmoon, Ashbourne, Co. Meath, pleaded guilty yesterday to eight charges of possessing the hormone-treated animals and one of failing to keep a proper record of the movement of the animals between April and July 2000. McDermott, described as a substantial farmer by Mr. Patrick MacEntee SC, defending, was given a six-month suspended prison sentence, fined a total of 11,427 Euro plus 750 Euro in costs and ordered to keep the peace for 2 years. On the 3rd of April 2000 Mr. John Larkin from the Department of Agriculture noticed abscesses on the rib cages of animals belonging to the defendant which had been processes at the plant. Examination of the carcasses found needle marks 3-4 inches deep. It was established that one of the animals had been treated with anabolic steroids, a triple cocktail of banned drugs, including one which was new to the department. On April 10th, 2000, McDermott submitted 11 more cattle for slaughter and, when tested, six were found to be positive. Three months later, when animals from the defendant’s farm were being slaughtered under permit, the cocktail of drugs was found again in one of the animals. One of the drugs used in the cocktail was Stanozonol, which causes depression and damage to the immune system in humans. Mr. Flaherty told Judge John Brophy that McDermott was a substantial farmer, and sold 1,000 cattle a year and received 24,795 in EU subsidies last year.



Sell your cows or go to jail. Elderly farmer’s last chance.

Daily Mirror, 07/12/2002

A judge issued his final warning to elderly farmer convicted of cruelty to cattle on her farm. Marie O’Sullivan, 78, from Doonaas,, Clonlara, Co. Clare, was convicted last month of eight offences including three of cruelty to cattle on her 130-acre farm. Yesterday at Limerick District Court, Judge Tom O’Donnell told O’Sullivan she would be sent to jail if her harm wasn’t depopulated within a fortnight. O’Sullivan’s solicitor, Aneas McCarthy, told the court her client was adamant to keep some of the cattle on the farm despite a court order to get rid of them all. But the judge said he was not wiling to allow the extreme cruelty to continue on the farm. The court also heard from Mary Bourke, a Department of Agriculture vet, that 23 cattle from the farm had been slaughtered last Thursday and that 17 would be removed next week. The court also heard the department was giving O’Sullivan one last chance to sell the rest of the herd or they would be removed and slaughtered by Christmas under EU regulations. Judge O’Donnell released O’Sullivan on bail until December 18 and warned that if the situation is not resolved he will jail her for 18 months despite her ages and ill health.



Twisted teens in farm slaughter

Animals burned alive in latest sickening attack on a quiet rural town

Sunday World, 07/04/2002

Callous youths set fire to a barn containing live sheep and lambs in the latest of crimes that has placed a quiet rural town under permanent siege, according to locals.  see more



Man who hung dog is ‘lunatic’

Sunday World, 26/03//2002

A man has appeared before Gorey District Court for hanging his labrador dog.

  James Boland (47) of Ballinatray Lower, Courtown Harbour, also faces public order offences and criminal damage charges arising from incidents last December.  Superintendent Pat Flynn told Judge Donnchadh O’Buachalla that Boland causes no problems when he’s not drinking but is “like lunatic” when he is. The defendant’s solicitor, David Terrant, said he spoke to a vet who said the killing of the dog was not as cruel as it might appear, and that the dog would have died within 30 seconds.

Superintendent Flynn disagreed, stating there were more humane ways of killing the animal. The judge adjourned the case until November 27, saying it was a very serious.



Sick Puppies

Sunday World, 03/03/2002

Animal rights campaigners have accused travellers of holding sick dogs to ransom.

  A couple running a dog refuge revealed that members of the travelling community are demanding cash to hand over ill animals.  Clare-based Sybil Hinze said that the dog owners refuse to allow their pets be taken away for treatment until they get up to £50 in cash.

  Sybil and husband Nick have been running a shelter for abused animals in Broad ford for three years.


Campaign

They also warned that ill-treatment of pets is not just confined for a major public educ6ation campaign.

  “We have picked up dogs from travellers and sometimes you do have to pay them to get the animals,” she said.

  “Some people won’t just give you the dog and there is no legal power that we have to seize the dogs. We are not the police. There is no law against tying a dog up to a caravan and leaving it there. All we can do is ask them nicely but they usually want money. They buy and sell dogs anyway. They ask for £30 or £50 for dogs. It depends on what you are willing to pay. But it is not only a travellers’ issue. There are other people, mostly farmers who can be ignorant of how to treat animals. People just need to be educated.”

Animal lover Sybil, who has seven dogs in her own home, also said some owners can become aggressive when rescuers try and seize their dogs.

  “It is not only the travellers but they can be aggressive,” she explained. “They do not like being told that they are doing any wrong with the animals. To try to take a dog from them or ask them for it when they don’t want to give it can make some of them very aggressive. But it is a matter of realising that a dog sometimes needs to see a vet and get vaccinations. We have picked up animals that travellers have just left behind, tied to trees after they move on. They are homeless and starving and in a bad condition.”

Sybil and Nick called for an education campaign for animal owners after the horrific death of a pony during a backstreet harness race this week.

  The animal died in agony after being forced to gallop at speeds of 30 mph in the race which took place in Castlemaine, Co Kerry.

  The incident highlighted the lack of resources for tackling animal cruelty in Ireland and sparkled outrage among animal lovers around the country.



Farmer denies growth promoter use

RTE News, 05/07/2002

A Waterford farmer has denied using banned growth promoters on his pigs.

  The Department of Agriculture and the Food Safety Authority are investigating the alleged breach of a restriction order placed on the farm.  The Department says the breach has led to some of the restricted pig meat finding its way into shops with some of it already eaten by consumers.

  The farmer, Tom Galvin, has denied using Carbadox since it was banned by the Eurpean Commission in 1999 over concerns about its potential effects on humans. Carbadox helps prevent pigs getting scour.

  Mr Galvin was informed on 22 April by the Department that one of his pigs had tested positive in a factory last November for the banned substance.  Mr Galvin said that although he had received no condemnation certificate for the pig in question, the movement of pigs on or off his farm has been in force since April.

In recent days, Department officials have been investigating the alleged illegal movement of about 1,500 pigs off the farm. Over a third have been seized and destroyed so far.

  Mr Galvin claims, however, that the Department has not tested his pigs.

  The Department says that although the consumption of pig meat from these animals is unlikely to be a significant health risk, it does not wish to understate the safety concerns surrounding Carbodox.



Farm couple face animal drugs charges

Irish Independent, 07/02/2002

A bottle containing an illegal cattle growth promoter was found in a famer’s wardrobe, a court heard yesterday.

  Department of Agriculture veterinary inspectors also discovered two bottles of illegal antibiotics stored in the farmer’s kitchen fridge at Ballindollaghan, Lissalway, Castlerea, Co Roscommon.

  James Brady (36) and his wife Mary are before Ballyhaunis District Court on summonses alleging they had possessions of animal remedies without a licence on July 25, 2000, contrary to the 1993 Animal Remedies Act. Both defendants deny the charges.

The bottles taken from the fridge were found to contain an antibiotic, oxytetracycline. The bottle taken from the wardrobe contained oestradiol benzoate and nortestosterone deconate, the court heard. The case continues today