Cases in 2001

Priest gives kennels a pounding.

Sunday People, 07/01/2001

A parish priest announced that the ISPCA was to be booted out of a dog shelter for neglecting dogs in its care.  see more


ISPCA gets dogs abuse over pound

Evening Herald, 8/2/2001

A Wicklow priest called for a public investigation into the operation of the counties dog pound. Fr. Campbell chairman of the Wicklow SPCA told a packed meeting in Ashford that the ISPCA needed to be taken apart from top to bottom. The meeting was held in the wake of an incident over Christmas when members of the WSPCA broke into the pound, which is run by the ISPCA and rescued two dogs. David Coulson told the angry meeting that the ISPCAs record in running dog pounds had been appalling. He claimed that unwanted dogs had been electrocuted since 1975 in Cork and that in Louth they had been shot until mid 1999 and that dogs from Leitrim had been sent to a rendering plant in Longford and eventually fed to pigs and chickens. However, since the BSE scare unwanted dogs now went to a rendering plant in Cavan, he said.


Farmer jailed for cruelty

Irish Independent, 08/02/2001

A 72 year old farmer convicted of animal cruelty opted to go to jail rather than pay a ₤5,000 donation to the ISPCA. Farmer Gerard Roche of Johnstown, Co. Wexford had appeared in Court on several occasions on a series of animal cruelty charges between December 1999 and March 2000. Roche had been given a six month suspended sentence by Judge Donnchadh O Buachall on condition that he paid the money. The judge told Roche that as he refused to pay the money he would make an order that he spend six months in jail.


Irish horse breeder in import ban

Sunday People, 24/04/2001

A Top Irish horse breeder and Grand National training legend has been left raging after being accused of illegally exporting bulls’ semen. Billy Rock who launched the career of top jockey Tony McCoy, faces charges of bringing the fluid into the Republic without a license. Rock and two other men will be fighting the charges in court but Billy has been suspended from the sperm import trade until the matter is settled. His business activities at his Co. Antrim farm are breeding horses and importing bulls’ semen for artificial insemination. The two other men charged are Robert Cameron from Mansfield Road, Mauchline, Ayrshire and James Ernest Campbell from ‘Lawnfield’, Tempo, Co. Fermanagh. A court hearing in regard to the allegations of three years ago has been suspended a number of times due to unavailability of witness due to the foot and mouth outbreak but it is finally due to go ahead in June.



The Sun/The Mirror, 15/05/2001 

(only main points)

Cornelius Keane, (37) Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co.Cork was jailed for three years at Cork Circuit case for injecting cattle with slurry to claim TB compensation. He took slurry from pits and injected into forty-nine cattle leaving them with lumps half the size of a football. Mr.Keane stood to gain £900 a month compensation for as long as his herd was confined to the farm. It was reported that Mr.Keane owned money to his bank and he stood to gain about £25.000 from the fraud. 



Fraud, Fraud and More Fraud

Farmers Journal, 19/05/2001 (Letters)

The latest scandal to rock the farming community is the jailing of a young Cork farmer who is a former nominee for the Young Dairy Farmer of the Year Award. Cornelius Keane from Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co. Cork, was jailed for three years for unmercifully injecting his cattle slurry in order to defraud the state of ₤20,000 in bovine TB compensation. Keane (37) injected a lethal concoction of caustic soda and slurry into his 49-strong herd. According to Judge AG Murphy this act of cruelty merited a lifetime ban from farming and a severe prison sentence. The effect of the injections on the herd was graphically described in court by senior veterinary inspector John Murray. He told how he found cattle with swellings the size of Gaelic footballs on their necks. The swellings were oozing poisonous puss and causing severe pain to the animals.



Two hunters fined £500 each for badger baiting.

Irish Examiner, 25/5/2001.
Two men, found guilty of badger baiting in April, were fined £1,000 in Roscrea District Court yesterday. Donnacha Doyle, 19, of Benamore, Roscrea, and Keith Murray, 21, of Golden Grove, Roscrea, who pleaded not guilty last month to hunting without permission, entering land to hunt, carrying a spade and firearm capable of hunting, hunting a protected animal, a badger, and interfering with a sett – were ordered to pay £500 each to separate animal charities. Two children accompanied the two men on the hunting exposition.


Irish Examiner, Daily Mirror, 09/06/2001

(main points)

Joe Meaney, (54) of Cappamore, Crusheen, Clare was jailed for one year and fined £3,000 for removing Department of Agriculture ear tags from two cattle and attaching them to completely different animals. He then sold the animals to another farmer in September 1999, making about £200. Mr.Meaney, a millionaire farmer pleaded not guilty to the charges at Ennis District Court on the 8/06/01.


Farmer guilty of brewing abhorrent animal cures

Irish Independent, 10/06/2001

A Farmer received a five month suspended sentence yesterday and had to donate €4,500 to the ISPCA after he was convicted of brewing illegal animal remedies – with ingredients like diesel oil – for sale or supply at his Cork home.  see more 

Dogs poisoned and dumped in car-park

The Nationalist, 01/10/2001
Two dogs were found poisoned at the entrance to the Brownshill Dolmen last week, even though their concerned owner was out searching desperately for them. Carlow ISPCA inspector Jean Bird is awaiting a full autopsy report on the bodies of the animals. However, preliminary results indicate that the dogs were poisoned. “There isn’t a question that they were hit by a car or anything,” explained Jean, who was called to the car park of the Brownshill Dolmen by members of the public appalled by the sight. “We’re still waiting the full lab result but a vet carried out preliminary tests which indicated they were poisoned. “We’ll now be fully investigating the matter. The owner of the dog is away on holiday and the dogs were being cared for by his father,” Jean explained. “The father works during the day so the dogs were kept on long chains in his back garden,” she added. It is understood that the dogs were lying, stretched out at the edge of a nearby car-park. There was no attempt made to bury the dogs and at this stage it is not known if the animals were dumped while alive or following their death. When contacted by The Nationalist the owner’s father explained how he had made several enquires as to the whereabouts of the dogs, who had broken from their chains at his home on Monday evening.



Sheep farmer ordered to pay £4,000 to ISPCA in cruelty case

The Nationalist, 30/03/2001

A county Carlow farmer had a two-month prison sentence suspended and was ordered to pay £4,000 to the ISPCA, after being convicted of cruelly ill-treating a number of animals on his farm.  see more



Irish Independent, 23/3/2001

James Cleary, Ahade, Kilbride, Co.Carlow pleaded guilty to charges of cruelty to animals, failure to inspect his animals and allowing his animals to wander on March 22, 1999. He was ordered to pay £4,000 to the ISPCA at Tullow, Co.Carlow District Court on the 22/03/01. He pleaded guilty to allowing up to 40 sheep to die on his farm due to neglect.



The Sun/The Mirror, 15/05/2001

 (main points)

Cornelius Keane, (37) Bawnbue, Drimoleague, Co.Cork was jailed for three years at Cork Circuit case for injecting cattle with slurry to claim TB compensation. He took slurry from pits and injected into forty-nine cattle leaving them with lumps half the size of a football. Mr.Keane stood to gain £900 a month compensation for as long as his herd was confined to the farm. It was reported that Mr.Keane owned money to his bank and he stood to gain about £25.000 from the fraud.



Farmer pleads guilty to cattle movement charges

Examiner, 17/11/2001 

The father of top jockey Norman Williamson was yesterday fined £1,000, ordered to pay £1,535 witness expenses and £500 costs after pleading guilty to charges relating to the illegal movement of cattle.  see more


Trial over as BSE fraud pair change their pleas to guilty

Examiner, 17/11/2001 

The BSE fraud trial ended dramatically yesterday when the West Cork father and son changed their pleas to "Guilty".  see more

                                


Livestock man wins bail appeal

Irish Independent, 15/05/2001

 A livestock dealer charged with illegally importing sheep shortly before the outbreak of foot-and-mouth and with revenue offences has been granted leave to apply for bail by the High Court.

  Wicklow-born John Walsh (50), with an address in Carlisle, Cumbria, has been held at Cloverhill prison in west Dublin since he was arrested last month by detectives from the Criminal Assets Bureau and the National Bureau of Criminal Investigation.

  At a previous hearing gardaÍ objected to bail because they believed hi would abscond.

  He has been charged with illegally importing 279 sheep.



Farmer convicted of animal cruelty chooses jail instead of fine

Irish Examiner, 08/02/2001

A 72-year-old Wexford farmer, convicted of several serious cases of animal cruelty, opted to go to jail for six months rather than pay a £5,000 donation to the Wexford Branch of the ISPCA.

  “You gave me the option of paying or going to jail. I’m going to jail,” defiant farmer Gerard Roche, Johnstown, Duncormack, Co. Wexford, told Judge Donnachadh O Buachalla at Wexford District Court.

The judge told the defendant that he was imposing a six-month suspended sentence on him on condition that he paid the money over and asked him if he needed more time to get the cash together”. The defendant replied to the judge: “I don’t need any more time, I’m quite determined that I’m not paying.”

  Roche who represented himself in court was asked by Judge O Buachalla if he needed a solicitor.

  “I don’t need one,” replied Roche.

Judge O Buachalla told the defendant that in that event he would make an order that he complete six months imprisonment. Roche was then taken to Wexford Garda Station before being transferred to Mountjoy.

  Roche had appeared in court on several occasions in respect of a series of animal cruelty cases which occurred between December, 1999, and March, 2000. In November, the court heard that while Roche had sold his herd for £80,000, much of the money had been spent on paying farm debts.

  The remainder of the money was said to be needed to improve Roche’s appalling living conditions. The judge, however, noted that the defendant still had 200 acres of land, a portion of which, he could sell to make the donation.



Farmers ignored block on animal moves in virus scare

Irish Independent, 15/06/2001

Two Co Galway farmers ignored the animal movement permit regulations introduced at the height of the foot-and-mouth disease emergency.

  Pat Fleming (67) of Corofin, with his son John, was moving about 50 sheep to an out-farm about two miles away on April 26 last when he ran into a Garda checkpoint.

  At Hearford District Court yesterday Judge John Garavan noted the date of the offence was at the height of the emergency and nobody should have taken such a chance. He imposed a £500 fine.

  Martin Joe Flaherty of Knockdoe, Loughgeorge, was taking a 13-year-old pony to tease a mare he wanted to get into foal when he was stopped on April 30 last.

  Sergent Clarke told the court that Mr Flaherty insisted that he had a valid permit to move the pony, but when he checked the records, it emerged that no such permit had been issued. The judge imposed a £1,000 fine.



Cruel farmer who injected cows with slurry in fraud attempt get three-year jail sentence

Irish Examiner, 15/05/2001

A farmer, who injected his cattle with slurry in an attempt to give them TB so he could claim a slaughter grant from the Department of Agriculture, was jailed for three years yesterday.  see more



Smuggled cattle may be source of BSE

Sunday Independent, 14/01/2001

The Irish beef industry is bracing itself for another major scandal with the revelation that hundreds and possibly thousands of cattle, untested for Mad Cow Disease and with forged papers, have illegally entered the food chain in the Republic.  see more



Two hunters fined £500 each for badger baiting

Irish Examiner, 25/05/2001

Two men, found guilty of badger baiting in April, were fined £1,000 in Roscrea District Court yesterday.

  Donnach Doyle, 19, of Benamore, Roscrea, and Keith Murray, 21, of Golden Grove, Roscrea, who pleaded not guilty last month to hunting without permission, entering land to hunt, carrying a spade and firearm capable of hunting, hunting a protected animal, a badger, and interfering with a sett – were ordered to pay £500 each to separate animal charities.

  Keith Murray, an apprentice fitter, was further charged with failing to allow the authorised person to use a shotgun on March 5, 2000, at Kilmartin, Borris-in-Ossory.

  Two children accompanied the two men on the hunting exposition.

  District Judge Mary Martin ordered Mr. Doyle to pay £500 to Badger Watch Ireland and Mr. Murray to pay £500 to the local ISPCA.

  Imposing penalties, Judge Martin adjourned matters in relation to conviction until July 26.

  The case arose following an investigation by conservation ranger James Green. On March 5, 2000, he went to Kilmartin, Borris-in-Ossory, acting on confidential information he received concerning the taking of badgers from the area.

  At about 2.30pm on the day in question, Mr Greene came across a Land Rover, attached to which was a dog box containing two terriers. While he checked the dogs and the tyres on the Land Rover for debris and clay, he heard dogs barking. He moved towards the source of the noise and saw four people walking away from a badger’s sett. One of them was carrying a spade and other was carrying a shotgun.

  Mr Greene said the badger’s sett had been dug up, but stones prevented any entry.

  However, at the sitting of the April court, defence solicitor Paddy Cadell put it to Mr Greene that the Kilmartin area was a very popular area for hunting rabbits.

  Donnacha Doyle told the court they had been out rabbit hunting. Doyle said a dog with them disappeared down a hole and when it did not return after 20 minutes Keith Murray got a stick from the ditch and rooted in the hole.

  A 14-year-old witness who accompanied the defendants told the court, in April, that the group had been hunting rabbits and that they had never been out badger-baiting. The second young witness said they had been hunting rabbits with the men.

  After yesterday’s case, Badger Watch Ireland and the Association of Hunt Saboteurs called on the Government to set up a wildlife crime unit to tackle illegal blood sports. Both groups said the establishment of the unit would represent a major step forward in the fight to end illegal wildlife crime.



Animal gang with guns

We conclude that they acted either from stupidity, laziness, or a perversion they enjoyed as ‘sport’

Irish Examiner, 24/03/2001

see more


It’s victory for the News of the World

News of the World, 28/01/2001

The Irish News of the Wold dealt a huge blow against dog fighting this week when two evil Mr Bigs admitted they were involved in the barbaric ‘sport.’

  Tony Mullen, 43, and Jeremy Brown, 41, pleaded guilty to dog fighting charges after being faced with overwhelming evidence. It was gathered during our five-month investigation which began in Dublin and end in justice.

  The probe exposed fighting dog breeders from Finglas to Limerick and a trail which led all the way over the water to England. Our damning dossier has now helped bring five men involved in the sick practice to justice.

  Mullen, of Birmingham – a known fan of Irish-bred pitbulls – admitted two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to his pitbull terrier Cracker, which suffered appalling injuries last March. He also admitted watching an organised fight. Brown, of Chesterfield admitted using a purpose-built pen at his allotment for fighting.

  In our probe, our three-man Dublin based team worked closely with Britain’s RSPCA officials and police officers who raided the pen and found a broken dog’s tooth, and a bloodstained claw and skin.

  Mullen and Brown will be sentenced by Mansfield magistrates next month along with Ryan Nuttall, 21, of Newstead, Notts who earlier admitted eight counts of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and one each for attending and organising a dog fight. Another two men – Nigel Greensmith, 32, of Newstead, and Andrew Taylor, 29, of Sutton-in-Ashfield, Derbys, were fined a total of £550 and ordered to pay £300 costs after admitting watching a fight last April.

  As a result of these convictions, many Irish dogs will be spared the utter humiliation and devastating pain of such evil contests.

  They are the latest in a long line of victories for justice won by Irish News of the World investigators. We have a long tradition of exposing villains. We have helped bring about more than 100 prosecutions of child molesters arms dealers, c6redit card fraudsters and drug dealers.

  We will continue to hound you out. The Irish News of the World NEVER gives up.



Remanded on cattle tags conviction

Irish Independent, 08/02/2001

A Cork livestock worker yesterday pleaded guilty to possessing implements adapted for the removal of ear-tags from cattle originating in Northern Ireland.

  Liam Morgan (43) from 41 Richmond Court, Bandon, Co Cork, admitted in Cork Circuit Criminal Court to possessing the implements at Macroom Livestock Buyers premises on August 7, 1998.

Judge A G Murphy remanded the father-of-four in custody to appear again in two weeks for sentencing. The Court was told that the prosecution arose from a surveillance operation mounted by Gardai following receipt of information from Northern Ireland.



Remanded on cattle tags conviction

Irish Independent, 08/02/2001

A Cork livestock worker yesterday pleaded guilty to possessing implements adapted for the removal of ear-tags from cattle originating in Northern Ireland.

  Liam Morgan (43) from 41 Richmond Court, Bandon, Co Cork, admitted in Cork Circuit Criminal Court to possessing the implements at Macroom Livestock Buyers premises on August 7, 1998.

Judge A G Murphy remanded the father-of-four in custody to appear again in two weeks for sentencing. The Court was told that the prosecution arose from a surveillance operation mounted by Gardai following receipt of information from Northern Ireland.