Cattle cruelty king’s luxury mansion

Sunday World, 21/11/1999

Roly-poly part-time farmer Thomas Greene – exposed for cruelty to animals on his own farm – is building a fairy-tale mansion on top of a hill.

Roly-poly part-time farmer Thomas Greene – exposed for cruelty to animals on his own farm – is building a fairy-tale mansion on top of a hill.

  Rotund Greene – outed after a major Sunday World investigation – is erecting a superb residence just outside his home town in Co Leitrim.

  While work continues on the expensive new home, Greene continues to run his accountancy business from the main street in Mohill.

  The huge two-storey home overlooks the magnificent vista offered by the picturesque village in south Leitrim.

  Tommy won’t have to strain his neck to see up to 30 miles in each direction…if the clouds break.

  The almost completed house is fronted with elaborate Doric columns, giving it a distinctly Greek feel.

  To each side of the sprawling home, that can only be reached up a newly laid driveway from the road, he has built roman-style arches.

  Two steep chimney pots jut out from the roof of the mansion that contains at least five upstairs bedrooms.

  At ground level, a majestic entrance hall splits two spacious living rooms to the front.

  The building is the talk of the nearby village. One local said: “It’s a magnificent home he’s building. He can see for miles and miles from up there.”

  Last year we told how we found dozens of dead and rotting cattle on his muddied farm at Clooncolry near Dromod.

  We photographed an appalling vista of death and devastation that left even the most hardened investigators shocked to the core.


Starving

As well as dead carcasses strewn half-buried on the farm, the Sunday World discovered up to 450 starving cattle cramped into a shed fit for only half that number.

  The building was so stuffed, the animals were unable to lie down or move around on the 15-acre farm.

  Stinking manure was piled up between the legs of the cows and drinking facilities were poor. There was insufficient feed stuff for the huge number of young cattle.

  We also found the rotting and emaciated carcasses of 30 animals at the rear of the shed. They were submerged in a half-flooded specially dug pit.

  One investigator remarked at the time: “The stench was horrendous. The smell of disease was everywhere.”

  A spokesman for the ISPCA remarked: “It’s the worst situation I have witnessed in years.”

 Since the expose, the cattle have been removed from the farm.

  It’s not the first time Tommy has been in trouble for ill-treating animals. He was convicted in 1995 for failure to bury dead animals and for cruelly ill-treating cattle on his former farm in Strokestown, Co Roscommon.

  After pleading guilty he was fined £50 for each offence.