Cases in 1998

Man jailed for killing pet donkey.

Evening Herald, 11/3/1998

23 year old Alan Carmichael of Castleview, Streamstown, Malahide was jailed for two years today for the horrific killing of a 32 year old female donkey. The court heard yesterday how Carmichael had beaten the animal with a steel fencing post before driving the iron bar through the animals’ eye and head.



Judge orders cock fight duo to pay fines.

Irish Independent, 25/3/1998

Two men were ordered to pay ₤200 each to the ISPCA when they admitted attending a cockfight.  see more

Examiner, 8/10/1998

(main points)

Jack Gallagher (52), Cranford Court, Donnybrook, Dublin pleaded guilty at Dublin District Court 7/10/98 to mistreating a rabbit contrary to the Protection of Animal Act. Mr. Gallagher was found in a nightclub in Baggot Street, Dublin with a pet rabbit in a briefcase. The animal which had conjunctivitis at the time was taken away for treatment. Mr.Gallagher, an unemployed man, said he lived alone and had the rabbit for company. He never intended to harm or be cruel to any animal.



Farmer is fined for the reckless use of shotgun

Irish Examiner, 16/01/1998

A Galway man who blasted in a neighbour’s front door with a shotgun while attempting to shoot a god he believed was worrying his sheep was fined and had his gun confiscated at Athernry Court this week.

Indeed, the dog did not even belong to the owners of the house in which the door was blasted with the shotgun and local Gardai said it was amazing that nobody was injured in the midnight shooting.

Dermot Monaghan, Ivy Mount, Knochaunglass, Athenry, was convicted at the local court this week of reckless discharge of a firearm after he had tracked down a dog he had shot to a neighbour’s door and fired at it.

The Court was not informed as to how the dog fared or if it survived the ordeal but the blast did considerable damage to the door the dog was standing outside and the defendant was ordered to pay £400 compensation to the owner of the damaged house.

Giving evidence Garda Sgt Michael Corry said that at approximately 3.30 am on September 21 last he responded to a call and arrived at the home of James Ruane at Knockaunglass, Athenry.

He saw that the front door of his house was shattered and Mr Ruane handed him five pellets he had found inside. On investigation a large number of pellet marks were found.

He went to tell the Court that the defendant had visited the Ruane household the previous evening to complain about dogs worrying his sheep. At about midnight on the night of the incident the defendant shot and wounded a dog which he believed was worrying his sheep.

He tracked the wounded animal and discharged shots at it.

Emmet Fitzgerald solicitor (defending) said his client was recognised as an up-standing member of the community but he had been having ongoing problems with dogs worrying his sheep and he had lost some sheep because of this in the past. He said this did not excuse his recklessness with a firearm but explained why he felt he had to take action to protect his flock.

Judge Al O’Dea imposed a fine of £500 for the reckless discharge of a firearm and ordered the confiscation of the shotgun and ammunition. He also fined Mr. Monaghan £350 for causing damage to property and ordered to pay £400 in compensation for the damage caused. He was allowed two months to pay or two months in jail in default.

When the defence solicitor asked for a review on the gun confiscation order the Judge said it would be better to leave that matter in the hands of the Garda sergeant.



Farmer is fined for the reckless use of shotgun

Irish Examiner, 16/01/1998

A Galway man who blasted in a neighbour’s front door with a shotgun while attempting to shoot a god he believed was worrying his sheep was fined and had his gun confiscated at Athernry Court this week.

  Indeed, the dog did not even belong to the owners of the house in which the door was blasted with the shotgun and local Gardai said it was amazing that nobody was injured in the midnight shooting.

  Dermot Monaghan, Ivy Mount, Knochaunglass, Athenry, was convicted at the local court this week of reckless discharge of a firearm after he had tracked down a dog he had shot to a neighbour’s door and fired at it.

  The Court was not informed as to how the dog fared or if it survived the ordeal but the blast did considerable damage to the door the dog was standing outside and the defendant was ordered to pay £400 compensation to the owner of the damaged house.

  Giving evidence Garda Sgt Michael Corry said that at approximately 3.30 am on September 21 last he responded to a call and arrived at the home of James Ruane at Knockaunglass, Athenry.

  He saw that the front door of his house was shattered and Mr Ruane handed him five pellets he had found inside. On investigation a large number of pellet marks were found.

  He went to tell the Court that the defendant had visited the Ruane household the previous evening to complain about dogs worrying his sheep. At about midnight on the night of the incident the defendant shot and wounded a dog which he believed was worrying his sheep.

  He tracked the wounded animal and discharged shots at it.

  Emmet Fitzgerald solicitor (defending) said his client was recognised as an up-standing member of the community but he had been having ongoing problems with dogs worrying his sheep and he had lost some sheep because of this in the past. He said this did not excuse his recklessness with a firearm but explained why he felt he had to take action to protect his flock.

  Judge Al O’Dea imposed a fine of £500 for the reckless discharge of a firearm and ordered the confiscation of the shotgun and ammunition. He also fined Mr. Monaghan £350 for causing damage to property and ordered to pay £400 in compensation for the damage caused. He was allowed two months to pay or two months in jail in default.

  When the defence solicitor asked for a review on the gun confiscation order the Judge said it would be better to leave that matter in the hands of the Garda sergeant.



Cattle left to rot on horror farm

Part-time farmer to be quizzed after 450 starving cows were found stuffed into shed

Sunday World, 15/11/1998

see more


Five-year gun licence ban for badger hunters

Examiner, 30/01/1998

Two Co. Kildare men were banned from holding firearm licences for five years and fined £40 each when they failed to have District Court convictions over a badger hunting incident, overturned at Trim Circuit Court yesterday.

  Evidence had been given at an earlier hearing by wildlife ranger, john Moore, of seeing John Casey, Coolcarrigan, and Peter Maher, Grangeclare, Robertstown, approach a badger set in a field near Kinnegad, on January 25, 1996.

  The defendants were seen carrying spades and sticks.

  After hearing that one of the part had already given the ranger a false name, Judge Pat McCartan told them: “Badger-baiting was to be the entertainment that day. You knew exactly what you were about, it’s a pity the penalties I can impose are so meagre, as I’m tempted to send both of you to jail.

  “What particularly disturbs me is that badgers are a much maligned and beautiful animal, who will fight to the death to protect their homes.

  “Both of you were aware of this and were armed with spades and sticks because of it.

  “No Irishman, and certainly no countryman, should be involved in such a thing. I hope you are both suitably ashamed of your actions.

  “The message can go out loud and clear to all gun club members, that this type of incident won’t be tolerated. One of you is secretary of your local gun club and perhaps when they see you both lost your gun licence for five years, they’ll get the hint.”

Donations totalling £1,400 were paid by the men to various animal charities.



Activists seek sharper bite

Ireland, 06/12/1998

Anti-bloodsport groups are calling for jail sentences for wildlife crimes following the conviction of a man for interfering with a badger sett.  see more



Legal action threat over foal’s death

Irish Independent, 21/04/1998

A Dublin man claims his mare was badly neglected by a Cork horse pound, reports Aidan Kelly.

  A Dublin horseowner is planning to take legal action against a horse pound following the death of his newly born foal.

  A mare belonging to Ballymun man Robert Curran foaled while it was in the pound in Glenville, Cork – used by both Fingal County Council and Dublin Corporation.

  When Mr Curran went down to the pound to pay £375 for the release of his horse, he claimed the foal – two days old at the time – was lying on the ground “totally neglected.”

  Three days after giving the foal constant care, supervision and treatment, it died.

  “It was a collection of skin and bones,” Mr Curran said. “I have never seen anything like it. They totally neglected the mare and the foal and the conditions down there were a disaster.”

Swords based vet Conor O’Scanaill, who attended to the foal, said the death could have been prevented.

  “My report said that the whole situation could have been avoided if the foal had been looked after since birth,” said Mr O’Scanaill. The mare is gradually improving but it is very hard to reverse the health of a very sick three to four day old foal, even if it was in Sheikh Mohammed’s stables.”

Mr Curran feared the worst for his horse after he and other horseowners watched a secret video shot at the pound, which shoed dead and dying horses in filthy conditions. The video, also screened on news channels recently, featured Mr Curran’s mare.

  The two Northside men who shot the video – Gerald Fitzgerald and John Farrell – went to court over the cruel treatment of horses at the pound as “unsanitary, inhumane and unacceptable.”

  Dublin Corporation agreed to certain proposals, one of which was that the pound would not be used again until it is certified fit for the job.

  Frank Murray, head of the corporation’s environment and culture department – which also implements the Control of Horses Bill – said farm land in Kilkenny is now being utilised as a pound until Cork is deemed fit enough to use again. All horses have been moved there with the exception of one, he said.

  Mr Murray said the Cork pound was in “excellent condition” when they inspected it last October but during the winter months it “cut up very badly” and it was brought to their attention. However, he denied that any horses were ill treated at the pound.

  “A lot of the horses are in very poor condition anyway when impounded and the vet has to put them down humanely,” Mr Murray said.

Mr Murray added staff at his department have been subjected to “a very high level of intimidation” from some horseowners since they commenced impounding horses under new legislation, although he said other horseowners have disassociated themselves from these.



Man who watched Co Kildare cock-fight fined £300

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched a cock-fight in a Co Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs.

  The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, which was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured.

  Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse.

  Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10.45 a.m. on July 6th, 1997.  Giving evidence yesterday, Garda Fahy said Dunne’s Nissan Primera car had been found parked near the location of the cock-fight at Grangemageny. Two bags with one cockerel inside each were discovered at the rear of the car, he said.

  Hugh Behan, who was convicted in February in relation to the same incident, said he had met and spoken with Dunne in the market at Athy. Dunne said there was “an exhibition” of birds taking place on that Sunday morning, and he agreed to go with him.

  After the Garda had arrived at the field, Behan said he had to be helped over a gate. But he insisted that he saw no cock-fighting take place and denied that Dunne had any cockerels in his car.

  Dunne told the court that he sat in a ditch after the Garda arrived at the field, and that he stayed there for four hours. He admitted being present at the incident, but denied cruelty charges.

  Judge Mary Martin fined Dunne £200 and ordered him to pay £100 towards veterinary expenses.  The case was adjourned to June 9th, to allow the fine to be paid.

  After the hearing the Irish Counc6il Against Bloodsports expressed deep disappointment at the fine and said laughter from the public gallery during the case suggested that the cock-fighting incident had not been taken seriously.

  “It was treated like a joke and trivialised. It is a sad day for those who campaign against cruelty to animals,” said a spokeswoman, Ms Aideen Yourell.



Owner fined £100 for cruelty to 17 dogs

Irish Times, 22/01/1998

A huntsman and dog-owner was yesterday fined £100 for cruelty to 17 foxhounds in what an animal welfare inspector described as “a most appalling case.”  Christopher O’Sullivan (40) from Shamrock Place, Ringaskiddy, Co Cork, pleaded guilty to cruelty to two dogs but denied he had been cruel to the rest.

  Animal welfare inspector Mr Ted O’Connor of the CSPCA said he found two dogs in a shed and wire compound in a field near O’Sullivan’s home on May 1st last.  One was heavy in pups and they were so bad it was difficult to recognise them as foxhounds.

  “The two dogs were in the most emaciated condition. One could clearly seek the skeletal fame of the dogs through their flesh…the dogs were tearing and scratching.

  “The floor of the compound was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish and old bones and they had no food or water,” Mr O’Connor told a spec6ial sitting of Carrigaline District Court.

Mr O’Connor said he found another 10 hounds in another wire compound attached to a ruined shed. These dogs were also tearing and scratching their bodies.

  “The whole floor area was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish and old bones. The smell…was overpowering. The dogs had no food and the only drink was a half-buc6ket of dirty green water.”

He found another hound in a small car trailer lying in a week’s faeces. There was no sign of food or water in the trailer, he said.

  “It was obvious these animals were suffering over a long period of time, left without food or water and kept in dirty compounds.”

He also found four hounds loose on a roadway. They looked reasonably healthy and this was probably because they weren’t confined to compounds and were able to scavenge for food.

  Garda Declan O’Connor said when he visited the compounds, he found the first two dogs in a wretched condition. “I have never seen a dog alive in such a condition.”

  O’Sullivan explained that he was secretary, huntsman, and kennelman of the Shamrock Harrier Club. He had been involved in the club since he was 10 years old. He had taken in a numb8er of dogs when some elderly members of the club retired or died. He had three dogs himself, but admitted he had overstocked.  The first two dogs had been missing for over six weeks and were dropping from hunger when he found them. He was unable to attend to them properly for a few days because of some shift work he had got with Irish Steel. The other dogs had a hard season and needed the summer to recover.  The dogs were kept in the shed only on three days a week when he fed them meat. He allowed them out into a field for the rest of the week. O’Sullivan claimed. He had given away most of the dogs to two other local harrier clubs and now kept only three himself.

  Solicitor Mr Eugene Murphy said his client “had been striving manfully to keep an ageing club together.” He was a dog-lover for over 30 years and regretted very much what had happened.

Judge Joseph Mangan fined O’Sullivan £100 and ordered him to pay £80 expenses.



Huntsman fined £100 for cruelty to his hounds

Irish Independent, 22/01/1998

A huntsman who starved two dogs until they began tearing at each others bodies was fined £100 yesterday after pleading guilty to cruelty charges.

  Christopher O’Sullivan, Shamrock Place, Ringaskiddy, Co Cork, pleaded guilty at Carrigaline District Court yesterday to cruelty to two dogs on May 1, 1997. He denied cruelty charges to 15 other dogs.

  Animal welfare official, Ted O’Connor, told Judge Joseph Mangan that the harriers were found locked in a derelict shed surrounded by a wire compound.

  The animals were so hungry that they were repeatedly tearing at their own skin and that of their companion.

  “The whole floor area was covered with several inches of faeces as well as rubbish and old bones,” Mr O’Connor told the court.

O’Sullivan told the court that he was secretary and kennelsman of the Shamrock Harriers Club.  He insisted that the dogs were not deliberately mistreated – explaining that they were “knackered” – after the hunting season.

  Judge Mangan convicted O’Sullivan of cruelty to all 17 dogs and fined him £100.



Huntsman fined for cruelty to harriers

Irish Examiner, 22/01/1998

A huntsman and dog lover was yesterday convicted and fined £100 for cruelty to 17 harriers in what an animal welfare inspector described as “a most appalling case.”

  Father of seven, Mr. Christopher O’Sullivan, (40), from 2 Shamrock Place, Ringskiddy, Co Cork pleaded guilty to cruelty to two dogs denying he had been cruel to the rest.

  Animal welfare Inspector Ted O’Connor said he found two of the dogs in a shed and wire compound in a field near O’Sullivan’s home on May 1 last year.

  “The two dogs were in an almost emaciated condition. One could clearly see the skeletal frame of one of the dogs through their flesh…the dogs were tearing and scratching,” he commented.

  “The floor of the compound was covered with several inches of faeces, rubbish, and old bones, and they had no food or water,” Mr O’Connor described to a special sitting of Carrigaline District Court.

Mr O’Connor said he found another ten hounds in another wire compound attached to a ruined shed. These dogs were also tearing and scratching their bodies.

  “The whole flood area was covered with several inc6hes of faeces, rubbish and old bones. The smell was overpowering. The dogs had no food and the only drink there was a half bucket of dirty green water,” he said.

Mr O’Connor found another hound in a small car trailer, lying in a week’s accumulation faeces. There was no sign of food or water in the trailer,” he said.

  “It was obvious these animals were suffering over a long period of time, left without food or water and kept in dirty compounds,” he said.

He also found hounds loose on a roadway. They looked reasonably healthy and this was probably due to the fact that they weren’t confined to compounds and were able to scavenge for food.

  Garda Declan O’Connor told the court that when he visited the compounds he found the first two dogs in a wretched condition. “I have never seen a dog alive in such a condition” said Garda O’Connor.

  O’Sullivan explained that he was secretary, huntsman and kennelsman of the Shamrock harrier Club. He had been involved in the club since he was ten years old.  He had taken in a number of dogs when some elderly members of the club retired or died. He had three dogs himself but he had overstocked, he admitted.  The first two dogs had been missing for over six weeks and were dropping from hunger when he finally found them.  He stated that he was unable to attend to the dogs properly for a few days because of some shift work he had got with Irish Steel.

  “The other dogs were after a hard season – they were well knackered after the year – it would take the summer to get them into shape.”

The dogs were only kept in the shed on three days a week when he fed them meat. He allowed them out into a field for the rest of the week, O’Sullivan claimed.  He had given away most of the dogs to two other local harrier clubs and now kept only three himself. He now kept these at kennels at Ballyfeard, he said.

  O’Sullivan’s solicitor Eugene Murphy said his client “had been striving manfully to keep an ageing club together.” He was a dog lover for over 30 years and regretted very much what had happened.

Judge Joseph Mangan fined Mr. O’Sullivan £100 and ordered him to pay £80 expenses for the Animal Welfare Officer, Mr Ted O’Connor.



Fifth Dog Poisoned In Enfiled District

Meath Chronicle, 17/01/1998

The death of a three year-old Lewellyn setter dog on New Year’s Day brought the total number of dogs poisoned in the Connellstown/Kilcorney area of Entfield in a three to four-week period to five.

  It was established subsequently, through veterinary examination and x-ray, that the dogs were poisoned with a Gramoxone/Paraquat substance. Users of such products can only purchase them through authorised agents who are obliged to keep a register of such sales. Enquiries are being made through these channels.

  It is understood that the poison was administered through chicken meat, apparently thrown into one or more of the gardens in the area. Samples of the meat have been sent to a laboratory for further testing.

  According to a local resident, whose dog was one of those poisoned “there has not been any trouble caused by dogs in the area, nor have there been any complaints of such to the Gardai or to the residents. Searches in the fields surrounding the community have not indicated any evidence of poison laid down and enquiries among local farmers bear this out.”

I  t is hoped that the ongoing investigations of locals, together with those of Entfield Gardai, will track down the person(s) responsible, so as to prevent even more callous acts.



Gardai question trio over killing of donkey

Irish Independent, 03/06/1998

Three men have been questioned by gardai about the brutal slaying of a donkey in Malahide last weekend.  An iron bar taken from a fence was cruelly driven through the animal’s eye and forced through the skull into her brain.

  Two men, aged 23 and 21, voluntarily called to Malahide garda station on Monday night to say they had been present at the killing. They said they had been horrified by what had happened and could not sleep.  Later a third man, a 22-year-old, who gardai believe carried out the killing, was questioned.

  All three are from the Malahide area. Gardai believe they were walking home from a pub and decided to see if they could ride the donkey.  When the donkey resisted, the assault took place. The men, two of whom are students, were not detained but a file is to be forwarded to the DPP.

  Gardai are not seeking anyone else in relation t the killing.

Local people have been shocked by the killing of the donkey Salt.



Donkey slaying: three quizzed

Evening Herald, 02/06/1998

Three young men were today questioned by detectives investigating the sadistic killing of a donkey in Dublin.  The barbaric slaying of the donkey in Malahide, Co. Dublin, last weekend drew nationwide outrage.

  But gardai confirmed today that three young men in their early 20s made statements in connection with the killing.


Locals

Two arrived voluntarily at Malahide station and a third tuned up by arrangement, gardai said.  A garda spokesman said: “We are not looking for anyone else.”

All three are locals. A file is being prepared for the DPP.  An iron bar was rammed through an eye of Salt, a white 36-year-old pet donkey, and forced into her brain.



Donkey slaying: three quizzed

Evening Herald, 02/06/1998

Three young men were today questioned by detectives investigating the sadistic killing of a donkey in Dublin.  The barbaric slaying of the donkey in Malahide, Co. Dublin, last weekend drew nationwide outrage.

  But gardai confirmed today that three young men in their early 20s made statements in connection with the killing.


Locals

Two arrived voluntarily at Malahide station and a third tuned up by arrangement, gardai said.  A garda spokesman said: “We are not looking for anyone else.”

All three are locals. A file is being prepared for the DPP.  An iron bar was rammed through an eye of Salt, a white 36-year-old pet donkey, and forced into her brain.




Donkey charge man in court

Evening Herald, 06/10/1998

A Malahide man, charged with the horror killing of a pet donkey, is to go on trial in the Dublin Circuit Court.

  In Swords District Court today, Judge Sean Delap told Allen Carmichael (22), of Castleview, Streamstown, Malahide, that the Director of Public Prosecutions had elected for trial in the circuit court.

  Carmichael is charged with the unlawful killing of a donkey on May 30, 1998 at The Casino, Dublin Road, Malahide. He is also charged with damaging the pet donkey, property of John Gilbert Kirker and Patrick Barrett, the Donkey Sanctuary, Liscarroll, Mallow, Co Cork.

  Carmichael is also charged with cruelly ill-treating and beating the donkey.

  At a previous hearing, Carmichael pleaded not guilty to all four charges against him.

Judge Delap remanded the case to Swords District Court on November 17 next and ordered that a book of evidence be prepared for the defendant.



Thugs brutalise and kill seaside community pet in savage act

They slaughter donkeys, don’t they?...

Irish Independent, 01/06/1998

A much-loved pet donkey enjoyed by Malahide children for more than 20 years was savagely killed in a brutal and senseless attack over the weekend.

  An iron bar taken from a fence was cruelly and callously driven through an eye of the 36-year-old animal and forced through the skull into her brain.  She had been beaten about the head with bar before the final assault took place.  The donkey was one of a pair – one white and one brown – known as “Salt and Pepper” which could be seen from the road.  She belonged to Dr John Kirker and his wife Elizabeth who live in a thatched residence on the Dublin Road, Malahide, close to the village.

  One or more intruders went into the meadow where the donkeys were kept and carried out the assault either late Friday night or early Saturday morning.  Salt was found with Pepper standing over her at 8am on Saturday morning by a workman. She was last seen alive the previous evening about 9pm by Mrs Kirker.

  A thorough investigation into the death is being carried out by Malahide gardai.

  The couple said yesterday they were horrified by what had happened.

  Pepper was yesterday taken to a donkey sanctuary in Liscarroll, Mallow, Co Cork for protection as the Kirkers became worried about his safety after the attack.  A normally quiet donkey, Pepper continually went back to the place where the killing occurred and brayed and roared until he was moved to the sanctuary.

  The Kirkers bought Salt from travellers in 1976 and she had been an object of affection and curiosity for children in Malahide ever since.  So many families used to come and feed the donkeys with apples and carrots that the Kirkers last year had put up a “no feeding” sign because they were becoming overweight.  Tourists used to stop to photograph the donkeys in front of the Kirkers thatched residence – one of the oldest homes in Malahide.

  “It’s deplorable what has happened. These donkeys were a symbol of goodwill and happiness and gave pleasure to generations of children,” said Dr Kirker, a semiretired neurologist.

  “Seeing the animal destroyed in this way can be seen as depriving so many people of pleasant memories they have had,” he said.

  “If someone can be capable of doing that you worry that they must be capable of carrying out more violence and no-one wants to see more violence c carried out. Ex4treme force would have been used to drive in the object because it was not sharp.”

Clem Ryan, chief welfare officer with the Donkey Sanctuary in Mallow, said: “This is the worst attack on a donkey I have ever heard of. It was a crazy thing to carry out.”

The sanctuary has taken in 1,500 donkeys in ten years. It currently has 450 donkeys being cared for by families around the country and 300 at Mallow.



Gardai question trio over killing of donkey

Irish Independent, 03/06/1998

Three men have been questioned by gardai about the brutal slaying of a donkey in Makahide last weekend.  An iron bar taken from a fence was cruelly driven through the animal’s eye and forced through the skull into her brain.

  Two men, aged 23 and 21, voluntarily called to Malahide garda station on Monday night to say they had been present at the killing. They said they had been horrified by what had happened and could not sleep.  Later a third man, a 22-year-old, who gardai believe carried out the killing, was questioned.  All three are from the Malahide area. Gardai believe they were walking home from a pub and decided to see if they could ride the donkey.

  When the donkey resisted, the assault took place. The men, two of whom are students, were not detained but a file is to be forwarded to the DPP.  Gardai are not seeking anyone else in relation to the killing.

Local people have been shocked by the killing of the donkey Salt.



Man who watched Co. Kildare cock-fight fined £300.

Irish Times, 25/03/1998

A man who watched cock-fight in a Co. Kildare field has been ordered by a court to pay £300 in fines and costs. The conviction of William Dunne at Athy District Court yesterday followed the conviction of seven other men on charges arising out of the cock-fight, whic6h was watched by as many as 100 people. Twelve cockerels were seized by the Garda, including one dead bird and two others which were injured. Dunne, of Riverstown, Killucan, Co. Westmeath, who pleaded not guilty to animal cruelty charges, pulled his sweater over his head and shouted at photographers as he left the courthouse. Garda Kevin Fahy and Garda Andrew Cullen, of Carlow Garda station, discovered the cock-fight taking place at 10:45am on July 6th, 1997.



Torture ordeal of a little dog

Sunday World, 08/11/1998

Evil thugs horribly tortured a family pet and left it to die in the street.

  The Jack Russell terrier was snatched by teenage boys and taken to a field in Tallaght, Dublin where he was hit on the head with an iron bar.

  They put a noose around his neck and spun him around in the air by his throat.

  They also rammed an iron bar up the dog’s back passage and stabbed it.

  Finola McCoy. A veterinary surgeon in Tallght, said the innards of the animal, named ‘Jack’ , had prolapsed and spun outside its back passage.

  “I have seen nothing as sick as this,” she said.

The attack happened on Monday when three teenage boys, aged between 15 and 17, grabb8ed the dog in front of two young children, aged five and three, who were playing in front of a house where the doy was lying.